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UK Space Agency backs Orbit Fab's innovative refueling interface, GRASP
With the success of our RAFTI refueling ports, this partnership with the UK Space Agency cements our vision for a sustainable, bustling space economy. The UK's strength in talent, coupled with its progressive space ecosystem, makes it the perfect location to reshape the frontiers of space servicing technology.
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UK Space Agency backs Orbit Fab's innovative refueling interface, GRASP
by Sophie Jenkins
London, UK (SPX) Nov 27, 2023

Orbit Fab, a frontrunner in on-orbit refueling services, has announced a pivotal partnership with the UK Space Agency to develop the GRASP (Grasping and Resupply Active Solution for Propellants) active refueling interface in the UK. This strategic collaboration aims to establish the necessary components for in-space refueling, a transformative concept set to redefine space mission operations.

The partnership leverages Orbit Fab's proven success in the UK, focusing on their innovative, cost-effective refueling architecture. This technology is vital for enhancing space sustainability, particularly in extending the mission life of existing national programme missions, including the UK ADR. The development of these technologies is not only a boost for current missions but also a significant stride towards more environmentally friendly space operations.

Manny Shar, Orbit Fab's UK Managing Director, emphasized the importance of this collaboration: "Spacecraft sustainability has always been one of the grand challenges in the space industry. With the success of our RAFTI refueling ports, this partnership with the UK Space Agency cements our vision for a sustainable, bustling space economy. The UK's strength in talent, coupled with its progressive space ecosystem, makes it the perfect location to reshape the frontiers of space servicing technology."

This initiative draws on the expertise of leading industrial and academic organizations, including MDA and City University, showcasing the collective brilliance and expertise of all involved. The combined efforts are expected to position the UK as a global leader in the development of in-space servicing technology.

Orbit Fab's capabilities in space refueling have been supported by Paul Bate, CEO of the UK Space Agency, who recently stated, "Orbit Fab's capabilities are instrumental for in-space sustainability and mobility. Their refueling expertise is world-leading, and this collaboration with the UK Space Agency further reinforces the crucial role they are playing in helping to catalyze investment in the UK."

The company's expansion in the UK is not only technological but also involves significant team growth, with plans to further enhance research, development, and production capacities to meet the growing demand for in-space fuel delivery.

Daniel Faber, Orbit Fab Founding CEO, shared his vision for the future: "We're not just envisioning the future; we're actively building it. Our commitment remains unyielding - to fuel every facet of the space economy, making satellites reusable and missions more sustainable. As rockets became reusable over the past decade, Orbit Fab's ambition has been to ensure that satellites follow suit. This partnership with the UK Space Agency is a significant leap in that direction."

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