Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .

Subscribe free to our newsletters via your

Tech titans pledge $1 bn for artificial intelligence research
by Staff Writers
San Francisco (AFP) Dec 12, 2015

Several big-name Silicon Valley figures have pledged $1 billion to support a non-profit firm that on Friday said it would focus on the "positive human impact" of artificial intelligence.

Backers of the OpenAI research group include Tesla and SpaceX entrepreneur Elon Musk, Y Combinator's Sam Altman, LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman, and PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel.

"It's hard to fathom how much human-level AI could benefit society, and it's equally hard to imagine how much it could damage society if built or used incorrectly," read the inaugural message posted on the OpenAI website.

"Our goal is to advance digital intelligence in the way that is most likely to benefit humanity as a whole, unconstrained by a need to generate financial return," the statement read.

The OpenAI funders "have committed $1 billion, although we expect to only spend a tiny fraction of this in the next few years."

Artificial intelligence is a red-hot field of research and investment for many tech companies and entrepreneurs.

However leading scientists and tech investors, including Musk, have publicly expressed concern over the risks that artificial intelligence could pose to humanity if mismanaged, such as the potential emergence of "Terminator"-type killer robots.

"We believe AI should be an extension of individual human wills and, in the spirit of liberty, as broadly and evenly distributed as is possible safely," read the statement, co-signed by the group's research director Ilya Sutskever.

"The outcome of this venture is uncertain and the work is difficult, but we believe the goal and the structure are right."

Because of the "surprising history" of artificial intelligence, "it's hard to predict when human-level AI might come within reach.

"When it does, it'll be important to have a leading research institution which can prioritize a good outcome for all over its own self-interest."






Related Links
All about the robots on Earth and beyond!

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
Robot adds new twist to NIST antenna measurements and calibrations
Boulder CO (SPX) Dec 09, 2015
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been pioneering antenna measurement methods for decades, but a new robot may be the ultimate innovation, extending measurements to higher frequencies while characterizing antennas faster and more easily than previous NIST facilities. The robot - actually a robotic arm of the type used in manufacturing - will be used to rapidly a ... read more

XPRIZE verifies moon express launch contract, kicking off new space race

Gaia's sensors scan a lunar transit

SwRI scientists explain why moon rocks contain fewer volatiles than Earth's

All-female Russian crew starts Moon mission test

Opportunity on west rim of Endeavour Crater within Marathon Valley

NASA's Curiosity rover reaches Martian sand dunes

Curiosity reaches sand dunes

Mars Mission Team Addressing Vacuum Leak on Key Science Instrument

Australia seeks 'ideas boom' with tax breaks, visa boosts

A Year After Maiden Voyage, Orion Progress Continues

NASA's Work to Understand Climate: A Global Perspective

Orion's power system to be put to the test

China launches new communication satellite

China's indigenous SatNav performing well after tests

China launches Yaogan-29 remote sensing satellite

China's scientific satellites to enter uncharted territory

Three astronauts land back on Earth from space station

Orbital cargo ship arrives at space station

Exp 45 set to return from space station

Getting Into the Flow on the ISS

GSDO review marks progress for KSC's modernization

SpaceX to launch rocket Dec 19, six months after blast

45th Space Wing supports NASA's Orbital ATK CRS-4 launch

Orbital cargo ship blasts off toward space station

Student helps discover new planet, calculates frequency of Jupiter-like planets

What kinds of stars form rocky planets

Half of Kepler's giant exoplanet candidates are false positives

Exiled exoplanet likely kicked out of star's neighborhood

Seeking a new generation of light-based sensing systems

'Al dente' fibers could make bulletproof vests stronger and 'greener'

New understanding of how shape and form develop in nature

On-the-go ultrahigh vacuum storage systems

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.