Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ICE WORLD
Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar
by Staff Writers
Edinburgh UK (SPX) Nov 29, 2017


Detailed radar maps of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica will improve forecasts of ice melt from this key contributor to sea levels.

New high-resolution maps of the complex landscape beneath a major West Antarctic glacier will be valuable for forecasting global sea level rise, researchers say.

Radar surveys of the land beneath Pine Island Glacier, obtained by snowmobile, have revealed a surprisingly diverse, mountainous landscape under the ice.

The findings are significant as Pine Island Glacier is the fastest melting glacier in Antarctica and currently accounts for up to 10 per cent of global sea level rise.

Ice melting into the ocean in the region is expected to increase as the climate warms and the West Antarctic ice sheet continues to thin.

The survey of the glacier, the most detailed to date, was carried out during the Antarctic summer of 2013 - 2014 by a team working round the clock. Snow vehicles equipped with radar sensors surveyed about 1500 sq km of ice, taking readings every few hundred metres.

The findings represent significant progress in the data available to inform forecasts of ice loss. Previous computer models used less comprehensive data from aerial radar surveys, which did not account for a range of ice bed shapes and the effects these could have on glacier friction.

The study shows that the diverse nature of the terrain beneath the glacier is the biggest factor affecting the flow of the ice across the landscape.

Scientists will incorporate the new findings into computer models used to project the glacier's future.

The study, published in Nature Communications, was led by the University of Edinburgh in collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey, the Universities of Swansea, Exeter and Aberdeen, and partners in the US and New Zealand. It was funded under the Natural Environment Research Council's iSTAR programme.

Dr Robert Bingham, of the University of Edinburgh's School of GeoSciences, who led the research, said: "Detailed understanding of this diverse landscape, and how that will impact on ice melt from Antarctica's fastest disappearing important glacier, will give us valuable clues as to how warming in this region will impact on global sea level."

Damon Davies, of the University of Edinburgh's School of GeoSciences, who took part in the research, said: "Pine Island Glacier is a key contributor to sea level rise, so this major step forward in understanding its dynamics will help improve our predictions of ice melt into the ocean."

Professor David Vaughan from British Antarctic Survey, who co-led the study, said: "These maps have revealed new features under Pine Island Glacier that we never thought were there. The bed turns out to be much rougher than we thought. There are mountains and deep scour marks which are clearly going to be influencing the flow and behaviour of the ice. In order to really understand how the glacier is going to respond to future change, we need to understand its interaction with the bed and these high resolution maps let us begin to do this."

ICE WORLD
Salt pond in Antarctica is fed from below
Seattle WA (SPX) Nov 21, 2017
At the base of the Transantarctic Mountains lies a geological oddity. Don Juan Pond is one of the saltiest bodies of water on the planet, filled with a dense, syrupy brine rich in calcium chloride that can remain liquid to minus 50 degrees Celsius, far below the freezing point of water. But the source of water and salt to this unusual pond remains a mystery - even as hints emerge that water in a ... read more

Related Links
University of Edinburgh
Beyond the Ice Age


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

ICE WORLD
Does the Outer Space Treaty at 50 need a rethink

NASA to send critical science, instruments to Space Station

Can a magnetic sail slow down an interstellar probe

SSL Selected to Conduct Power and Propulsion Study for NASA's Deep Space Gateway Concept

ICE WORLD
Flat-Earther's self-launch plan hits a snag

SSTL ships CARBONITE-2 and Telesat's LEO-1 for PSLV launch

Aerojet Rocketdyne supports ULA Delta II launch of JPSS-1

Old Rivals India, China Nurture New Rivalry in Satellite Launch Business

ICE WORLD
Gadgets for Mars

Ice shapes the landslide landscape on Mars

Winds Blow Dust off the Solar Panels Improving Energy Levels

Previous evidence of water on Mars now identified as grainflows

ICE WORLD
Nation 'leads world' in remote sensing technology

China plans for nuclear-powered interplanetary capacity by 2040

China plans first sea based launch by 2018

China's reusable spacecraft to be launched in 2020

ICE WORLD
Need to double number of operational satellites: ISRO chief

Space Launch plans UK industry tour

Astronaut meets volcano

European Space Week starts in Estonia

ICE WORLD
New way to write magnetic info could pave the way for hardware neural networks

Device could reduce the carbon footprint of ethylene production

Researchers inadvertently boost surface area of nickel nanoparticles for catalysis

X-rays reveal the biting truth about parrotfish teeth

ICE WORLD
Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula reveals a cryptic methane-fueled ecosystem in flooded caves

Researchers prolong life by curbing common enzyme

First known interstellar visitor is an 'oddball'

Lava or Not, Exoplanet 55 Cancri e Likely to have Atmosphere

ICE WORLD
Pluto's hydrocarbon haze keeps dwarf planet colder than expected

Jupiter's Stunning Southern Hemisphere

Watching Jupiter's multiple pulsating X-ray Aurora

Help Nickname New Horizons' Next Flyby Target




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement