Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















TECH SPACE
Scientists create tiny laser using silver nanoparticles
by Brooks Hays
Espoo, Finland (UPI) Jan 3, 2017


disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only

Scientists in Finland have paved the way for a new breed of ultrafast nanoscale lasers. Researchers at Aalto University have created a laser that works at such minuscule scales, the light can bounce back and forth just a few hundred times.

The plasmic laser generates visible light waves using dark lattice modes, a first.

Most lasers rely on mirrors to generate the feedback signal necessary for laser light. The nano laser uses radiative coupling between silver nanoparticles, instead. The laser-generating nanoparticles are arranged in a periodic array, each particle -- measuring just 100 nanometers across -- acts as a tiny antenna.

The input energy necessary to trigger laser light is provided by organic fluorescent molecules. Because the laser light wavelengths and the spacing between nanoparticles match, the array radiates in unison.

Tiny lasers can be tremendously useful in science, but they can also be extremely difficult to work with. In this case, laser light created at such small scales can be too short-lived to be useful.

Researchers skirted the problem by using what are called "dark modes."

"A dark mode can be intuitively understood by considering regular antennas: A single antenna, when driven by a current, radiates strongly, whereas two antennas -- if driven by opposite currents and positioned very close to each other -- radiate very little," researcher Paivi Torm said in a news release. "A dark mode in a nanoparticle array induces similar opposite-phase currents in each nanoparticle, but now with visible light frequencies."

Researchers also found a unique way to let light escape the confines of the tiny array.

"By utilizing the small size of the array, we found an escape route for the light," explained Ph.D. student Heikki Rekola. "Towards the edges of the array, the nanoparticles start to behave more and more like regular antennas that radiate to the outer world."

Researchers detailed their new laser in the journal Nature Communications.


Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

.


Related Links
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
TECH SPACE
The hidden inferno inside your laser pointer
Tucson AZ (SPX) Jan 03, 2017
If you thought that a kid's room, a Norwegian Nobel Laureate and a laser pointer had nothing in common, two UA physicists are about to enlighten you. It's hard to believe, but after having unraveled many of the laws that make the universe tick, physicists still haven't reached an agreement on whether something as seemingly simple as "hot" or "cold" can be measured in a system under certain circu ... read more


TECH SPACE
Tech show looks beyond 'smart,' to new 'realities'

'Passengers' and the real-life science of deep space travel

NASA Readies for Major Orion Milestones in 2017

India achieves advances multiple space systems in 2016

TECH SPACE
Preparing to Plug Into NASA SLS Fuel Tank

New round of wind tunnel tests underway for bigger SLS version

United Launch Alliance launches EchoStar XIX satellite

Ultra-Cold Storage - Liquid Hydrogen may be Fuel of the Future

TECH SPACE
Small Troughs Growing on Mars May Become 'Spiders'

All eyes on Trump over Mars

Opportunity performs several drives to ancient gully

Full go-ahead for building ExoMars 2020

TECH SPACE
Chinese missile giant seeks 20% of a satellite market

China-made satellites in high demand

Space exploration plans unveiled

China launches 4th data relay satellite

TECH SPACE
Airbus DS and Energia eye new medium-class satellite platform

OneWeb announces key funding form SoftBank Group and other investors

Space as a Driver for Socio-Economic Sustainable Development

SoftBank delivers first $1 bn of Trump pledge, to space firm

TECH SPACE
Scientists create tiny laser using silver nanoparticles

Divide and conquer pattern searching

Scientists hope to make concrete tougher by studying its defects

The hidden inferno inside your laser pointer

TECH SPACE
The blob can learn and teach

Searching a sea of 'noise' to find exoplanets - using only data as a guide

Microlensing Study Suggests Most Common Outer Planets Likely Neptune-mass

Exciting new creatures discovered on ocean floor

TECH SPACE
Exploring Pluto and the Wild Back Yonder

Juno Captures Jupiter 'Pearl'

Juno Mission Prepares for December 11 Jupiter Flyby

Research Offers Clues About the Timing of Jupiter's Formation




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement