Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ENERGY TECH
New metrology technique measures electric fields
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 28, 2017


Photo of the first fiber-coupled vapor-cell for electrical field measurements. The fiber-coupled sensor head (i.e., the vapor cell) can be moved off the optical table for ease of operation, which is useful in field-strength measurements, and for near-field and sub-wavelength imaging applications.

In the last decades, mobile phones and other wireless devices have become central features of life around the globe. These devices radiate varied amounts of electromagnetic energy and thus project electric fields into the surrounding space. It is crucial to the design and deployment of these devices that they have accurate and traceable measurements for electric fields and radiated power. Until recently, however, it was not possible to build self-calibrating probes that could generate independent and absolute measurements of these electric field values.

"Existing electric field probes rely on a calibration process that poses something of a chicken-and-egg dilemma," said Christopher L. Holloway, a scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. "To calibrate a probe, we have to use a known field. But to have a known field, we must use a calibrated probe."

To address this problem, Holloway and his colleagues have developed a new method to measure electric fields and a new probe to carry out such measurements. They share their work this week in the Journal of Applied Physics, from AIP Publishing.

"The foundation for our methodology is a well-studied technique called 'Electromagnetically Induced Transparency' (EIT). EIT involves a medium that normally absorbs light, and uses a system of two lasers tuned to the transition between states of the atoms in the medium to make the medium transparent," Holloway said.

"One of our key innovations involves exciting alkali atoms in a medium to a Rydberg, or high-energy, state. Under those circumstances, a radio frequency electric field can be used to excite the atoms to the next atomic transition state, causing the EIT signal to split into two," said Holloway.

"The splitting of the EIT signal spectrum is easily measured and is directly proportional to the applied radio frequency electric field amplitude."

The net result is that the strength of an electric field can be calculated by measuring frequency with a high degree of accuracy and by using Planck's constant, which will soon be recognized as a defined unit by the International System of Units (SI).

As a corollary, this measurement technique has a direct SI traceability path, an important feature for international metrology organizations. It would also be considered self-calibrating because it is based on atomic resonances.

Beyond these methodological improvements, the new technique promises to dramatically expand the scope of electric fields that can be measured.

"Currently, there is no way to perform calibrated measurements of electric fields with frequencies that exceed 110 GHz," Holloway said. "This new technique solves this problem and may allow for the calibrated measurement of electric fields with frequencies as large as one terahertz. This expanded bandwidth will be relevant for future generations of wireless mobile telecommunication systems."

"Another important benefit is that it allows for very small spatial resolution when imaging microwaves. In principle, it should allow for imaging of microwave field distributions with a resolution on the order of optical wavelengths, many orders of magnitude smaller than microwave wavelengths. This could be particularly helpful for the measurement of electric fields in biomedical realms," Holloway said.

Holloway and his colleagues have designed a probe consisting of a fiber-coupled vapor cell that can be used to measure electric fields with this new technique. Going forward, they intend to work with other collaborators on miniaturizing the technology.

The article, "Electric field metrology for SI traceability: Systematic measurement uncertainties in electromagnetically induced transparency in atomic vapor," is authored by Christopher L. Holloway, Matt T. Simons, Joshua A. Gordon, Andrew Dienstfrey, David A. Anderson and Georg A. Raithel. The article will appear in the Journal of Applied Physics June 20, 2017 [DOI: 10.1063/1.4984201].

ENERGY TECH
Making hydrogen fuel from humid air
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 16, 2017
One of the biggest hurdles to the widespread use of hydrogen fuel is making hydrogen efficiently and cleanly. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Nano a new way to do just that. They incorporated a photocatalyst in a moisture-absorbing, semiconducting paint that can produce hydrogen from water in the air when exposed to sunlight. The development could enable hydrogen fuel production in alm ... read more

Related Links
American Institute of Physics
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

ENERGY TECH
NASA Statement on National Space Council

Silicon-on-Seine: world's biggest tech incubator opens in Paris

India, Portugal Shake Hands on Space Cooperation

Return to the blue

ENERGY TECH
Ariane 5 launch proves reliability and flies new fairing

Aerojet Rocketdyne advocates solar electric propulsion as central element of deep space exploration

Modified Proton-M carrier rocket to be first launched in 2019

N. Korea conducts rocket engine test: report

ENERGY TECH
Mars Rover Opportunity continuing science campaign at Perseverance Valley

The Niagara Falls of Mars once flowed with lava

Russian Devices for ExoMars Mission to Be Ready in Fall 2017

No One Under 20 Has Experienced a Day Without NASA at Mars

ENERGY TECH
China heavy-lift carrier rocket launch fails: state media

Yuanwang-3 completes ship check mission, ready for Chang'e-5 lunar probe launch

China prepares to launch second heavy-lift carrier rocket

China to launch Long March-5 Y2 in early July

ENERGY TECH
Second launch doubles number of Iridium NEXT satellites in orbit to 20

HTS Capacity Lease Revenues to Reach More Than $6 Billion by 2025

OneWeb inaugurates production line Assembly, Integration, and Test of OneWeb satellites

SES Restores Capacity from AMC-9 Satellite

ENERGY TECH
The sharpest laser in the world

Johns Hopkins scientists develop super-strong metal for next tech frontier

One billion suns: World's brightest laser sparks new behavior in light

Stanford engineers design a robotic gripper for cleaning up space debris

ENERGY TECH
Extreme Atmosphere Stripping May Limit Exoplanets' Habitability

NASA diligently tracks microbes inside the International Space Station

Complex Organic Molecules Found On "Space Hamburger"

NASA keeps a close eye on tiny stowaways

ENERGY TECH
Mid-infrared images from the Subaru telescope extend Juno spacecraft discoveries

Earth-based Views of Jupiter to Enhance Juno Flyby

NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10

Topsy-Turvy Motion Creates Light-Switch Effect at Uranus




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement