Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















ROCKET SCIENCE
NASA Completes Critical Design Review for Space Launch System
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 23, 2015


Artist concept of the Block I configuration of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). The SLS Program has completed its critical design review, and the program has concluded that the core stage of the rocket will remain orange along with the Launch Vehicle Stage Adapter, which is the natural color of the insulation that will cover those elements. Image courtesy NASA. For a larger version of this image please go here.

For the first time in almost 40 years, a NASA human-rated rocket has completed all steps needed to clear a critical design review (CDR). The agency's Space Launch System (SLS) is the first vehicle designed to meet the challenges of the journey to Mars and the first exploration class rocket since the Saturn V.

SLS will be the most powerful rocket ever built and, with the agency's Orion spacecraft, will launch America into a new era of exploration to destinations beyond Earth's orbit. The CDR provided a final look at the design and development of the integrated launch vehicle before full-scale fabrication begins.

"We've nailed down the design of SLS, we've successfully completed the first round of testing of the rocket's engines and boosters, and all the major components for the first flight are now in production," said Bill Hill, deputy associate administrator of NASA's Exploration Systems Development Division. "There have been challenges, and there will be more ahead, but this review gives us confidence that we are on the right track for the first flight of SLS and using it to extend permanent human presence into deep space."

The CDR examined the first of three configurations planned for the rocket, referred to as SLS Block 1. The Block I configuration will have a minimum 70-metric-ton (77-ton) lift capability and be powered by twin boosters and four RS-25 engines.

The next planned upgrade of SLS, Block 1B, would use a more powerful exploration upper stage for more ambitious missions with a 105-metric-ton (115-ton) lift capacity. Block 2 will add a pair of advanced solid or liquid propellant boosters to provide a 130-metric-ton (143-ton) lift capacity. In each configuration, SLS will continue to use the same core stage and four RS-25 engines.

The SLS Program completed the review in July, in conjunction with a separate review by the Standing Review Board, which is composed of seasoned experts from NASA and industry who are independent of the program. Throughout the course of 11 weeks, 13 teams - made up of senior engineers and aerospace experts across the agency and industry - reviewed more than 1,000 SLS documents and more than 150 GB of data as part of the comprehensive assessment process at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, where SLS is managed for the agency.

The Standing Review Board reviewed and assessed the program's readiness and confirmed the technical effort is on track to complete system development and meet performance requirements on budget and on schedule.

The program briefed the results of the review in October to the Agency Program Management Council, led by NASA Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot, as the final step in the CDR process.

This review is the last of four reviews that examine concepts and designs. The next step for the program is design certification, which will take place in 2017 after manufacturing, integration and testing is complete. The design certification will compare the actual final product to the rocket's design. The final review, the flight readiness review, will take place just prior to the 2018 flight readiness date.

"This is a major step in the design and readiness of SLS," said John Honeycutt, SLS program manager. "Our team has worked extremely hard, and we are moving forward with building this rocket. We are qualifying hardware, building structural test articles, and making real progress."

Critical design reviews for the individual SLS elements of the core stage, boosters and engines were completed successfully as part of this milestone. Also as part of the CDR, the program concluded the core stage of the rocket and Launch Vehicle Stage Adapter will remain orange, the natural color of the insulation that will cover those elements, instead of painted white. The core stage, towering more than 200 feet tall and with a diameter of 27.6 feet, will carry cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen fuel for the rocket's four RS-25 engines.

The integrated spacecraft and payloads are nearing completion on their CDR. Flight hardware currently is in production for every element. NASA is preparing for a second qualification test for the SLS boosters, and structural test articles for the core and upper stages of the rocket are either completed or currently in production. NASA also recently completed the first developmental test series on the RS-25 engines.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Space Launch System
Rocket Science News at Space-Travel.Com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ROCKET SCIENCE
The Mysteries of Astronautics
Bethesda MD (SPX) Oct 20, 2015
Astronautics is the discipline of designing, building, and operating space vehicles. This field of endeavor addresses the design of space missions, spacecraft and in-orbit operations. Related technological areas include rocket engines, launch vehicles, orbital mechanics, satellite dynamics and control, space navigation and numerous others. An astronautics education provides the foundation ... read more


ROCKET SCIENCE
Watch worn by US astronaut on Moon sells for $1.6 mn

Europe-Russia Lunar mission will make them friends again

Mound near lunar south pole formed by unique volcanic process

Lunar Pox

ROCKET SCIENCE
Landing site recommended for ExoMars 2018

You too can learn to farm on Mars

The Martian Astrobiologist

Opportunity parked for solar panels to charge up for winter

ROCKET SCIENCE
The Study of Science through Popular Movies

Reentry data will help improve prediction models

Hold on to your hoverboard: 'Back to the Future' is now

Journaling: Astronauts chronicle missions

ROCKET SCIENCE
The Last Tiangong

China aims to go deeper into space

Latest Mars film bespeaks potential of China-U.S. space cooperation

Exhibition on "father of Chinese rocketry" opens in U.S.

ROCKET SCIENCE
RSC Energia patented inflatable space module for ISS

Clearing the Space Fog on ISS

International Space Agencies Meet to Advance Space Exploration

Meet the International Docking Adapter

ROCKET SCIENCE
Ariane 5 is delivered for Arianespace's sixth heavy-lift mission of 2015

ORBCOMM Announces Launch Window For Second OG2 Mission

10th Anniversary of the Final Titan

China puts new communication satellite into orbit for HK company

ROCKET SCIENCE
NASA's K2 Finds Dead Star Vaporizing a Mini 'Planet'

Cosmic 'Death Star' is destroying a planet

Most earth-like worlds have yet to be born, according to theoretical study

Airbus DS ready to start testing exoplanet tracker CHEOPS

ROCKET SCIENCE
Nanoscale diamond 'racetrack' becomes breakthrough Raman laser

Deutsche Telekom, Huawei in cloud link to rival Amazon

Ukraine to receive U.S. radars by mid-November

Metal defects can be eliminated by cyclic loading




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement