Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




TECH SPACE
Lockheed completesc assembly of next-gen weather satellite for NOAA
by Staff Writers
Denver CO (SPX) Jun 05, 2015


Lockheed Martin engineers and technicians test the deployment of the large GOES-R satellite solar array before the spacecraft undergoes environmental testing. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Lockheed Martin has completed assembly of NOAA's GOES-R weather satellite and is now beginning critical testing of the spacecraft. The first of four next-generation geostationary weather satellites, GOES-R will provide a major improvement in quality, quantity and timeliness of weather data collected over the current Geostationary Operation Environmental Satellite (GOES) system that monitors weather over North America.

The GOES-R satellite is now undergoing environmental testing to simulate the conditions of launch and the extreme environment the satellite will experience in space.

The first stop for the satellite and its six instruments is a 65 foot-tall thermal vacuum chamber at Lockheed Martin's facility near Denver. Over the next two months, the satellite will be powered-on, tested in a vacuum and exposed to extreme cold and heat. The satellite will also undergo a variety of additional tests including reverberant acoustic, separation and deployment shock, vibration, and electromagnetic interference and compatibility testing.

"NOAA's GOES satellites are our nation's weather sentinels and are vital to our severe storm prediction and warnings," said Tim Gasparrini, vice president and GOES-R Series program manager at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. "Now that the first GOES-R Series satellite is complete and environmental testing is underway, we're one step closer to providing a necessary upgraded capability to NOAA and our nation."

GOES-R is scheduled to launch in March 2016 on an Atlas V from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

GOES-R will provide higher-resolution images of weather patterns and severe storms five times faster than today, which will contribute to more accurate and reliable weather forecasts and severe weather outlooks.

GOES-R's data will support short-term weather forecasts and severe storm watches and warnings, maritime forecasts, seasonal predictions, drought outlooks and space weather predictions. Additionally, GOES-R products will improve hurricane tracking and intensity forecasts, and increase thunderstorm and tornado warning lead time.

In addition to the four GOES-R Series satellites, Lockheed Martin also designed and built the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) instruments that will fly aboard each spacecraft.

The NOAA Satellite and Information Service funds, manages, and will operate the GOES-R Series satellites. NASA oversees the acquisition and development of the GOES-R spacecraft and instruments for NOAA. The program is co-located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Lockheed Martin
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
MUOS-3 communications satellite completes in-orbit testing
Sunnyvale, Calif. (UPI) Jun 3, 2015
The U.S. Navy has accepted the third Mobile User Objective System satellite from Lockheed Martin following in-orbit testing. The satellite, launched last January, enhances secure mobile military communications by providing seamless connections globally with new smartphone-like capabilities, including simultaneous voice, video and mission data transmission on a high-speed Internet Protoc ... read more


TECH SPACE
Crashing comets may explain mysterious lunar swirls

Google Lunar X-Prize meets Yoda

China, Russia plan joint landing on the Moon

NASA's LRO Moves Closer to the Lunar Surface

TECH SPACE
Building a Smarter Rover

Mars Missions to Pause Commanding in June, Due to Sun

United Arab Emirates Hopes to Reach Mars by2021

NASA Begins Testing Next Mars Lander Insight

TECH SPACE
NASA 'flying saucer' launch set for Friday

Destination Mars? NASA's Flying Saucer May be the Ticket

US Lawmakers Pass Bill for Space Mining in the Future

New Heads for Indian Space Agency's Spaceport, Key Units

TECH SPACE
China Plans First Ever Landing On The Lunar Far Side

China ranked 4th among world space powers

3D printer making Chinese space suit parts

Xinhua Insight: How China joins space club?

TECH SPACE
Space Station remodelling

NASA Delays Approval on International Space Station Projects

Space age mice are thin-skinned

NASA Begins Major Reconfiguration of International Space Station

TECH SPACE
Angara to launch first manned rocket from Vostochny in 2023

Airbus developing reusable space rocket launcher

Recent Proton loss to push up launch costs warns manufacturer

Air Force Certifies SpaceX for National Security Space Missions

TECH SPACE
Astronomers Discover a Young Solar System Around a Nearby Star

Circular orbits identified for small exoplanets

Weather forecasts for planets beyond our solar system

Astrophysicists offer proof that famous image shows forming planets

TECH SPACE
Lockheed completesc assembly of next-gen weather satellite for NOAA

How natural channel proteins move in artificial membranes

Researchers simulate behavior of 'active matter'

An inexpensive rival to graphene aerogels




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.