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CHIP TECH
High-precision control of printed electronics
by Staff Writers
Linkoping, Sweden (SPX) Jul 07, 2017


This is a high precision control of printed electronics. Credit Thor Balkhed

Printed electronic transistor circuits and displays, in which the colour of individual pixels can be changed, are two of many applications of ground-breaking research at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linkoping University. New groundbreaking results on these topics have been published in the prestigious scientific journal Science Advances.

The researchers in organic electronics have a favourite material to work with: the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS, which conducts both electrons and ions. Displays and transistors manufactured from this polymer have many advantages, which include that they are simple and cheap to manufacture, and the material itself is non-hazardous. It has, however, been difficult to create devices that switch rapidly at a specific voltage, known as the "threshold voltage". This gives that it has, so far, been difficult to control the current state of the transistors or the color state of the displays in a precise manner.

"The lack of any threshold in the redox-switching characteristics of PEDOT:PSS hampers bistability and rectification, characteristics that would allow for passive matrix addressing in display or memory functionality" says Simone Fabiano, senior lecturer at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, LOE, who is the principal author of the article in Science Advances, together with Negar Sani from the research institute RISE Acreo.

More than five years ago a wild idea arose at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics: could you solve this problem by combining electrochemistry with ferroelectricity? Ferroelectric materials consist of dipoles. One end of a dipole has a positive charge and the other a negative charge, and these "ferroelectric" dipoles rotate when they are exposed to an electric field beyond a specific threshold.

Head of the laboratory Professor Magnus Berggren couldn't let this idea rest, and when he was awarded a research grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation in December 2012 to use freely, this was one of the high-risk projects he chose to invest in.

"We called the research then breakneck research, and here is a result. Our demonstration proves that truly leading research typically take a long time and require considerable patience. Simone Fabiano has done tremendous work here, and refused to give up when others have doubted," says Magnus Berggren.

After many years of tenacious experiments, Simone Fabiano and his colleagues at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics have managed to apply a thin layer of a ferroelectric material onto one electrode in organic electrochemical devices and circuits.

"The thickness of the layer determines the voltage at which the circuit switches or the display changes colour. Transistors are no longer required in the displays: we can control them pixel-by-pixel simply through a thin ferroelectric layer on the electrode," says Simone Fabiano.

The LOE research group shows in the article that "ferroelectrochemistry", the combination of ferroelectricity and electrochemistry, can be used in displays in the field of printed electronics and in organic transistors. The scientists envisage, however, many other areas of application.

"Ferroelectrochemical components can easily be integrated into memory matrices and into bioelectronic applications, just to give a couple of examples," says Simone Fabiano.

The technology is now protected by patents.

"The field of ferroelectrochemistry doesn't actually exist, but we have achieved success using this combination," Magnus Berggren concludes.

Research Report: "Ferroelectric polarization induces electronic nonlinearity in ion-doped conducting polymers"

CHIP TECH
Molecular electronics scientists shatter 'impossible' record
Orlando FL (SPX) Jul 07, 2017
An international research team that includes University of Central Florida Professor Enrique del Barco, Damien Thompson of the University of Limerick and Christian A. Nijhuis of the National University of Singapore has cracked an important limitation that for nearly 20 years has prevented the practical use of molecular diodes. Electrical circuits are the basic building blocks of modern ele ... read more

Related Links
Linkoping University
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com

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