Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



CARBON WORLDS
Graphene makes rubber more rubbery
by Staff Writers
Manchester UK (SPX) May 25, 2016


Strain testing on graphene and rubber samples to show how much more stretchy it is than normal rubber. Watch a video on the research here.

In an article published in Carbon, Dr Aravind Vijayaraghavan and Dr Maria Iliut from Manchester have shown that adding a very small amount of graphene, the world's thinnest and strongest material, to rubber films can increase both their strength and the elasticity by up to 50%. Thin rubber films are ubiquitous in daily life, used in everything from gloves to condoms.

In their experiments, the scientists tested two kinds of rubbery materials - natural rubber, comprised of a material called polyisoprene, and a man-made rubber called polyurethane. To these, they added graphene of different kinds, amounts and size.

In most cases, it they observed that the resulting composite material could be stretched to a greater degree and with greater force before it broke. Indeed, adding just one tenth of one percent of graphene was all it took to make the rubber 50% stronger.

Dr Vijayaraghavan, who leads the Nano-functional Materials Group, explains "A composite is a material which contains two parts, a matrix which is soft and light and a filler which is strong. Taken together, you get something which is both light and strong. This is the principle behind carbon fibre composites used in sports cars, or Kevlar composites used in body armour.

"In this case, we have made a composite of rubber, which is soft and stretchy but fragile, with graphene and the resulting material is both stronger and stretcher"

Dr Maria Iliut, a research associate in Dr Vijayaraghavan's group, describes how this material is produced: "We use a form of graphene called graphene oxide, which unlike graphene is stable as a dispersion in water. The rubber materials are also in a form that is stable in water, allowing us to combine them before forming thin films with a process called dip moulding."

"The important thing here is that because these films are so thin, we need a strengthening filler which is also very thin. Fortunately, graphene is both the thinnest and strongest material we know of."

The project emerged from a call by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to develop a more desirable condom. According to Dr Vijayaraghavan, this composite material has tremendous implications in daily life.

He adds "Our thinking was that if we could make the rubber used in condoms stronger and stretchier, then you could use that to make even thinner condoms which would feel better without breaking.

"Similar arguments can be made for using this material to make better gloves, sportswear, medical devices and so on. We are seeing considerable industrial interest in this area and we hope more companies will want to get involved in the commercial opportunities this research could create."


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of Manchester
Carbon Worlds - where graphite, diamond, amorphous, fullerenes meet






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
CARBON WORLDS
Unveiling the electron's motion in a carbon nanocoil
Toyohashi, Japan (SPX) May 19, 2016
Carbon nanocoils (CNCs) are an exotic class of low-dimensional nanocarbons whose helical shape may make them suitable for applications such as microwave absorbers and various mechanical components such as springs. Typical thicknesses and coil diameters of CNCs fall within the ranges of 100-400 nm and 400-1000 nm, respectively, and their full lengths are much larger, on the order of several tens ... read more


CARBON WORLDS
NASA research gives new insights into how the Moon got inked

First rocket made ready for launch at Vostochny spaceport

Supernova iron found on the moon

Russia to shift all Lunar launches to Vostochny Cosmodrome

CARBON WORLDS
Ancient tsunami evidence on Mars reveals life potential

Hubble Takes Mars Portrait Near Close Approach

Mars - Closest, Biggest and Brightest in a Decade

Mars Rover Scientist Hopes to Find More Evidence of Liquid Water on the Red Planet

CARBON WORLDS
Space travel now in a parachute soon available

Airbus Defence and Space starts Orion service module assembly

Interns Make Archived NASA Planetary Science Data More Accessible

Out of this world: 'Moon and Mars veggies' grow in Dutch greenhouse

CARBON WORLDS
China, U.S. hold first dialogue on outer space safety

Long March-7 rocket delivered to launch site

China's space technology extraordinary, impressive says Euro Space Center director

China can meet Chile's satellite needs: ambassador

CARBON WORLDS
Alexander Gerst to be Space Station commander

ISS completes 100,000th orbit of Earth: mission control

Canadian astronaut to join ISS in 2018

NASA, Space Station partners announce future mission crew members

CARBON WORLDS
Fregat is fueled in Arianespace's FCube facility for Soyuz Flight VS15

Pre-launch processing is underway with Indonesia's BRIsat for the next Arianespace heavy-lift flight

Russia Spent $1.3Bln on Vostochny Cosmodrome So Far

New Antares Rocket Rolls Out at NASA Wallops

CARBON WORLDS
Kepler-223 System Offers Clues to Planetary Migration

Star Has Four Mini-Neptunes Orbiting in Lock Step

Exoplanets' Orbits Point to Planetary Migration

Synchronized planets reveal clues to planet formation

CARBON WORLDS
How the giant magnetoelectric effect occurs in bismuth ferrite

Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties

Combining nanotextures with Leidenfrost effect for water repellency

Dynamic dazzle distorts speed




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement