Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















TIME AND SPACE
Existence of a new quasiparticle demonstrated
by Staff Writers
Vienna, Austria (SPX) Mar 01, 2017


This is an artist's impression of the angulon quasiparticle formed from a methane molecule in superfluid helium. Image courtesy IST Austria.

How do molecules rotate in a solvent? Answering this question is a complicated task since the molecular rotation is perturbed by a very large number of surrounding atoms. For a long time, large-scale computer simulations have been the main approach to model molecule-solvent interactions. However, they are extremely time consuming and sometimes completely infeasible.

Now, Mikhail Lemeshko from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) has proven that angulons - a certain type of quasiparticle he proposed two years ago - do in fact form when a molecule is immersed in superfluid helium. This offers a quick and simple description for rotation of molecules in solvents.

In physics, the concept of quasiparticles is used as a technique to simplify the description of many-particle systems. Namely, instead of modeling strong interactions between trillions of individual particles, one identifies building blocks of the system that are interacting with one another only weakly.

These building blocks are called quasiparticles and might consist of groups of particles. For example, to describe air bubbles rising up in water from first principles, one would need to solve an enormous set of equations describing the position and momentum of each water molecule.

On the other hand, one could notice that the bubbles themselves can be treated as individual particles - or quasiparticles - which drastically simplifies the description of the system. As another example, consider a running horse engulfed in a cloud of dust.

One can think of it as a quasiparticle consisting of the horse itself and the dust cloud moving along with it. Understanding what is going on in terms of such a 'quasi-horse' is substantially easier compared to treating every dust grain, as well as the horse, separately in a complicated simulation.

The latter example is similar to what Mikhail Lemeshko did in his study. Instead of treating the rotating molecule and all the atoms of the surrounding material separately, he used angulons to look at the problem from a different perspective. Angulon quasiparticles, which form when a rotating object interacts with a surrounding environment, were predicted theoretically two years ago by Lemeshko and Schmidt.

Until now, however, they were considered only theoretically and their actual existence was still to be demonstrated. Lemeshko's study, which was published this week in Physical Review Letters, is based on experimental data collected by several laboratories over the last two decades.

All the experiments had one thing in common: molecules of different types were observed to rotate inside tiny droplets of superfluid helium. As Lemeshko has shown, independent of which molecule was studied, be it heavy or light species, methane, water, carbon dioxide or ammonia, the outcome of the angulon theory was always in good agreement with the measurements. This indicates that the angulon quasiparticles indeed form inside helium droplets.

"In our first study we proposed angulons as a possibility for describing rotation of molecules in solvents. Now we have provided strong evidence that angulons actually exist," says Lemeshko. This substantially simplifies existing many-particle theories and could lead to applications in molecular physics, theoretical chemistry, and even biology.

A first application of the angulon theory was already found by Enderalp Yakaboylu, a postdoc in Lemeshko's group. The authors predicted that even a medium that is non-polarizable can shield an immersed impurity from an external electromagnetic field. This effect, which seems to contradict intuition, is called "anomalous screening" and is caused by an exchange of angular momentum on quantum level.

The discovery, which the authors also publish in Physical Review Letters, was made possible by describing the charged particle and the interacting surroundings as angulon quasiparticle. Future measurements will show if the prediction can be proven experimentally.

Research paper

TIME AND SPACE
First trace of differences between matter and 'ordinary' antimatter
Cracow, Poland (SPX) Feb 24, 2017
The world around us is mainly constructed of baryons, particles composed of three quarks. Why are there no antibaryons, since just after the Big Bang, matter and antimatter came into being in exactly the same amounts? A lot points to the fact that after many decades of research, physicists are closer to the answer to this question. In the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment the first ... read more

Related Links
Institute of Science and Technology Austria
Understanding Time and Space

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

TIME AND SPACE
How bright is the future of space food

Marshall shakes, packs, ships and tracks NASA payloads

Guardsmen to test space capsule recovery systems

NASA and SpaceX gives ASU a competitive edge in technological innovation

TIME AND SPACE
SpaceX says it will fly civilians to the moon next year

Flight Hardware for NASA's Space Launch System on Its Way to Cape

Spacex To Send Privately Crewed Dragon Spacecraft Beyond The Moon Next Year

Sounding Rocket Flies in Alaska to Study Auroras

TIME AND SPACE
Martian Winds Carve Mountains, Move Dust, Raise Dust

Science checkout continues for ExoMars orbiter

More Earth-like than moon-like

NASA Explores Opportunity for Smaller Experiments to 'Hitch a Ride' to Mars

TIME AND SPACE
China to launch first high-throughput communications satellite in April

Chinese cargo spacecraft set for liftoff in April

China looks to Mars, Jupiter exploration

China's first cargo spacecraft to leave factory

TIME AND SPACE
Kacific places order with Boeing for a high throughput satellite

ESA affirms Open Access policy for images, videos and data

Iridium Announces Target Date for Second Launch of Iridium NEXT

Italy, Russia working closely on Mars exploration, Earth monitoring satellites

TIME AND SPACE
When Rocket Science Meets X-ray Science

York Space partners with Metropolitan State for Denver satellite facility

New 'tougher-than-metal' fiber-reinforced hydrogels

Raytheon gets contract for Silent Knight radar systems

TIME AND SPACE
Volcanic hydrogen spurs chances of finding exoplanet life

Evidence of Star Wars-like Planetary System

The missing link in how planets form

Does Pluto Have The Ingredients For Life?

TIME AND SPACE
Juno to remain in current orbit at Jupiter

Europa Flyby Mission Moves into Design Phase

NASA receives science report on Europa lander concept

New Horizons Refines Course for Next Flyby




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement