Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




CARBON WORLDS
Creating a Graphene-Metal Sandwich to Improve Electronics
by Sean Nealon for UCR News
Riverside CA (SPX) Mar 19, 2014


Pradyumna Goli, left, and Alexander Balandin in Balandin's Nano-Device Laboratory.

Researchers have discovered that creating a graphene-copper-graphene "sandwich" strongly enhances the heat conducting properties of copper, a discovery that could further help in the downscaling of electronics.

The work was led by Alexander A. Balandin, a professor of electrical engineering at the Bourns College of Engineering at the University of California, Riverside and Konstantin S. Novoselov, a professor of physics at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom. Balandin and Novoselov are corresponding authors for the paper just published in the journal Nano Letters. In 2010, Novoselov shared the Nobel Prize in Physics with Andre Geim for their discovery of graphene.

In the experiments, the researchers found that adding a layer of graphene, a one-atom thick material with highly desirable electrical, thermal and mechanical properties, on each side of a copper film increased heat conducting properties up to 24 percent.

"This enhancement of copper's ability to conduct heat could become important in the development of hybrid copper - graphene interconnects for electronic chips that continue to get smaller and smaller," said Balandin, who in 2013 was awarded the MRS Medal from the Materials Research Society for discovery of unusual heat conduction properties of graphene.

Whether the heat conducting properties of copper would improve by layering it with graphene is an important question because copper is the material used for semiconductor interconnects in modern computer chips. Copper replaced aluminum because of its better electrical conductivity.

Downscaling the size of transistors and interconnects and increasing the number of transistors on computer chips has put an enormous strain on copper's interconnect performance, to the point where there is little room for further improvement. For that reason there is a strong motivation to develop hybrid interconnect structures that can better conduct electrical current and heat.

In the experiments conducted by Balandin and the other researchers, they were surprised that the improvement of thermal properties of graphene coated copper films was significant despite the fact that graphene's thickness is only one atom. The puzzle was solved after they realized the improvement is the result of changes in copper's nano- and microstructure, not from graphene's action as an additional heat conducting channel.

After examining the grain sizes in copper before and after adding graphene, the researcher found that chemical vapor deposition of graphene conducted at high temperature stimulates grain size growth in copper films. The larger grain sizes in copper coated with graphene results in better heat conduction.

Additionally, the researchers found that the heat conduction improvement by adding graphene was more pronounced in thinner copper films. This is significant because the enhancement should further improve as future copper interconnects scale down to the nanometers-range, which is 1/1000thof the micrometer range.

In the future, Balandin and the team would like to investigate how heat conduction properties change in nanometer-thick copper films coated with graphene. They also plan to develop a more accurate theoretical model to explain how thermal conductivity scales with the grain sizes.

In addition to Balandin and Novoselov, co-authors of the Nano Letters paper, "Thermal Properties of Graphene-Copper-Graphene Heterogeneous Films," were: Pradyumna Goli, a post-doctoral student in Balandin's lab and Hao Ning, Xuesong Li and Ching Yu Lu, all of whom work for Bluestone Global Tech in Wappingers Falls, NY.

The work at UC Riverside on this project was supported by the National Science Foundation and by STARnet Center for Function Accelerated nanoMaterial Engineering (FAME), a Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) program sponsored by Microelectronics Advanced Research Corporation (MARCO) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

.


Related Links
STARnet Center for Function Accelerated nanoMaterial Engineering
Carbon Worlds - where graphite, diamond, amorphous, fullerenes meet






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CARBON WORLDS
Colored diamonds are a superconductor's best friend
Berkeley CA (SPX) Mar 13, 2014
Flawed but colorful diamonds are among the most sensitive detectors of magnetic fields known today, allowing physicists to explore the minuscule magnetic fields in metals, exotic materials and even human tissue. University of California, Berkeley, physicist Dmitry Budker and his colleagues at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and UCLA have now shown that these diamond sensors ca ... read more


CARBON WORLDS
China's Jade Rabbit lunar rover rouses from latest slumber

Study on lunar crater counting shows crowdsourcing effective, accurate tool

Spacesuits And Moon Notes Among The Stars At Bonhams NYC Auction

Russia to launch three lunar rovers from 2016 to 2019

CARBON WORLDS
The Exploration of Murray Ridge Continues

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Resumes Full Duty

NASA Orbiter Safe After Unplanned Computer Swap

Mars name-a-crater scheme runs into trouble

CARBON WORLDS
ORBITEC and Wisconsin Await Countdown for "VEGGIE" to Space on SpaceX 3

Jack Kinzler, savior of Skylab, dies at 94

Orion Makes Testing, Integration Strides Ahead of First Launch to Space

London makes new push to rival Silicon Valley

CARBON WORLDS
Tiangong's New Mission

"Space Odyssey": China's aspiration in future space exploration

China to launch first "space shuttle bus" this year

China expects to launch cargo ship into space around 2016

CARBON WORLDS
Russian Progress Spacecraft Boosts ISS Orbit

Japanese astronaut becomes ISS commander

Station Crew Preps for Return to Earth, Repairs Recycling System

NASA says US-Russia space ties 'normal'

CARBON WORLDS
Proton-M with two Russian communication satellites on board blasts off from Baikonur

ASTRA 5B delivered for integration on Ariane 5 launcher

Proton-M carrier rocket with two satellites abroad installed on Baikonur launch pad

Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services Announces Industry-Unique "Refund Or Reflight" Program

CARBON WORLDS
UK joins the planet hunt with Europe's PLATO mission

X-ray laser FLASH spies deep into giant gas planets

Crashing Comets Explain Surprise Gas Clump Around Young Star

Every red dwarf star has at least one planet

CARBON WORLDS
Heat-Based Technique Offers New Way to Measure Microscopic Particles

A brake for spinning molecules

In the lab, scientists coax E. coli to resist radiation damage

Reducing debris threat from satellite batteries




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.