Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



IRON AND ICE
Close Approach of Asteroid 2012 TC4 Poses no Danger to Earth
by Tomasz Nowakowski for Astro Watch
Los Angeles CA (SPX) Oct 16, 2017


Calculations revealed by JPL in July 2017 indicated that 2012 TC4 could pass as close as 4,200 miles (6,800 kilometers). These results were based on only seven days of tracking of this asteroid after it was discovered. However, new observations of this space rock conducted at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) by Olivier Hainaut, Detlef Koschny and Marco Micheli of the European Space Agency (ESA) in July and August 2017, show different estimates.

The house-sized asteroid 2012 TC4 is slated to give Earth a close shave on Thursday, October 12, swooshing by our planet at approximately 5:41 UTC (1:41 a.m. EDT) at a distance of about 31,000 miles (50,000 kilometers). Although there were some worries that this rocky object could hit the Earth, latest observations confirm that it poses no danger to our home planet at all.

"The actual miss distance is pinned down to around 50,000 kilometers, which makes it about a once in two years occurrence, a bit noteworthy, but not really a very big deal. There is no hazard in its upcoming pass or anytime in the near future," Alan Harris, a former Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) researcher told Astrowatch.net.

Asteroid 2012 TC4 was discovered on Oct. 4, 2012 by the Pan-STARRS observatory in Hawaii. Week later, it gave Earth a close shave when it passed the planet at the distance of 0.247 LD (lunar distance), or 58,900 miles (94,800 kilometers).

Observations reveal that 2012 TC4 is an elongated and rapidly rotating object and has been known to make many close approaches to Earth in the past. The space rock orbits the sun approximately every 1.67 years at a distance of about 1.4 AU. Astronomers estimate that 2012 TC4 has a diameter between 26 to 85 feet (8 to 26 meters).

Calculations revealed by JPL in July 2017 indicated that 2012 TC4 could pass as close as 4,200 miles (6,800 kilometers). These results were based on only seven days of tracking of this asteroid after it was discovered. However, new observations of this space rock conducted at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) by Olivier Hainaut, Detlef Koschny and Marco Micheli of the European Space Agency (ESA) in July and August 2017, show different estimates.

"The new calculations indicate that TC4 will fly safely past our planet on Oct. 12, at a distance of about 43,500 kilometers (27,000 miles) above the surface, or about one-eighth of the distance to the Moon," JPL informed.

Therefore, new data provided by the latest observational campaign exclude the possibility of 2012 TC4 hitting our planet. Harris underlines that even if this asteroid crashed into Earth it would not cause any major damage.

"It is small enough (about the size of the Chelyabinsk meteor) that even if it impacted it would be unlikely to cause any major damage. Recall that the Chelyabinsk meteor only caused substantial damage and injuries because it chanced to hit over a populated area. Over most of the Earth's area, it would have been completely harmless," Harris said.

The meteor that exploded over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk in February 2013, injuring 1,500 people and damaging over 7,000 buildings, was about 66 feet (20 meters) wide.

The upcoming close approach of 2012 TC4 will offer a great opportunity for astronomers worldwide to observe an asteroid from a relatively close distance. The asteroid's fly-by will be also monitored by the International Asteroid Warning Network as part of an exercise of the recovery, characterization and reporting of a potentially hazardous object approaching Earth.

"The October pass will bring the asteroid up to magnitude 14, so extensive physical studies will be possible, but only briefly. It probably is a fast rotator (period under an hour) so full rotational coverage likely can be obtained in a single night," Harris told Astrowatch.net.

IRON AND ICE
A geochemist from MSU has assessed the oxidative environment inside asteroids
Moscow, Russia (SPX) Oct 06, 2017
A postgraduate of the Faculty of Geology at Moscow State University working as a part of an international team has assessed the oxidative environment and its changes inside asteroids from the core to the surface. This gives the authors of the study a better understanding of how the planets were formed. The paper was published in Meteoritics and Planetary Science. Asteroids were formed by a ... read more

Related Links
Astro Watch
Asteroid and Comet Mission News, Science and Technology


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

IRON AND ICE
NASA May Extend BEAM's Time on the International Space Station

US spacewalkers install 'new eyes' at space station

USNO Astronomers Measure New Distances To Nearby Stars

OECD calls for tourism to be more sustainable

IRON AND ICE
SpaceX launches, lands recycled rocket

ASPIRE Successfully Launches from NASA Wallops

Russia May Adjust Space Program to Construct Super-Heavy Carrier Rocket

Angola's First Satellite to Be Launched From Baikonur Spaceport Dec. 7

IRON AND ICE
Opportunity Feeling the Chemistry

Russian Space Research Institute Announces July 2020 Date for Mission to Mars

ASU examines Mars' moon Phobos in a different light

Another Chance to Put Your Name on Mars

IRON AND ICE
China launches three satellites

Mars probe to carry 13 types of payload on 2020 mission

UN official commends China's role in space cooperation

China's cargo spacecraft separates from Tiangong-2 space lab

IRON AND ICE
Turkey, Russia to Enhance Cooperation in the Field of Space Technologies

Lockheed Martin Completes First Flexible Solar Array for LM 2100 Satellite

SpaceX launches 10 satellites for Iridium mobile network

GomSpace and Luxembourg to develop space activities in the Grand Duchy

IRON AND ICE
Thales demos capability of ballistic missile tracking radar

Microlasers get a performance boost from a bit of gold

Students, researchers turn algae into renewable flip-flops

New test opens path for better 2-D catalysts

IRON AND ICE
Biomarker Found In Space Complicates Search For Life On Exoplanets

Are Self-Replicating Starships Practical

New telescope attachment allows ground-based observations of new worlds

The Super-Earth that Came Home for Dinner

IRON AND ICE
Helicopter test for Jupiter icy moons radar

Solving the Mystery of Pluto's Giant Blades of Ice

Global Aerospace Corporation to present Pluto lander concept to NASA

Pluto features given first official names




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement