Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















ICE WORLD
Climate change adds to pressures on endangered African penguins
By Kerry SHERIDAN
Miami (AFP) Feb 9, 2017


Climate change and overfishing have left already endangered young penguins in Africa confused about where to find food, and they are dying in high numbers as a result, researchers said Thursday.

The report in the journal Current Biology describes a dire predicament for African penguins, whose young population is projected to be down 50 percent in some of the most affected areas of coastal Namibia and South Africa.

"Our results show that juvenile African penguins are stuck foraging for food in the wrong places due to fishing and climate change," said lead author Richard Sherley of the University of Exeter and University of Cape Town.

The problem happens when the young penguins leave their colonies for the first time and travel long distances, searching the ocean for signs that an area has plenty of fish and the smaller creatures they feed on, called plankton.

These signs include areas of low sea temperatures and high chlorophyll-a, which indicates plankton is near, and likely also the sardines and anchovies that feed on it.

"These were once reliable cues for prey-rich waters, but climate change and industrial fishing have depleted forage fish stocks in this system," said Sherley.

"These signs can now lead them to places where these fish, the penguins' main prey, are scarce."

Researchers used satellites to track newly fledged African penguins from eight sites across their breeding range.

They found that many penguins were getting trapped in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME), an area that stretches from southern Angola to Cape Point in South Africa's Western Cape.

The region has suffered from decades of overfishing and environmental changes, reducing the number of fish.

"The penguins still move to where the plankton are abundant, but the fish are no longer there," Sherley said.

Young penguins that wind up there often starve to death.

"Their breeding numbers are about 50 percent lower than they would be if they found their way to other waters, where the human impact has been less severe," said the study.

Scientists are considering the possibility of transporting young penguins to areas where food is more abundant.

African penguins are considered endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), with about 50,000 penguins remaining in Namibia and South Africa.

Food shortage is considered the main reason for their endangered status.

African penguins are "undergoing a very rapid population decline, probably as a result of commercial fisheries and shifts in prey populations," said the IUCN.

"This trend currently shows no sign of reversing, and immediate conservation action is required to prevent further declines."


Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Beyond the Ice Age






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ICE WORLD
The making of Antarctica
Montreal, Canada (SPX) Feb 01, 2017
One of the big mysteries in the scientific world is how the ice sheets of Antarctica formed so rapidly about 34 million years ago, at the boundary between the Eocene and Oligocene epochs. The first explanation is based on global climate change: Scientists have shown that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels declined steadily since the beginning of the Cenozoic Era, 66 million years ago. Once CO2 dr ... read more


ICE WORLD
The Outer Space Treaty has been remarkably successful - but is it fit for the modern age?

Full Braking at Alpha Centauri

New Era of Space Travel: Private Station May Replace ISS by Late 2020

Progress MS-03 cargo spacecraft to reenter January 31

ICE WORLD
ISRO tests C25 Cryogenic Upper Stage of GSLV MkIII

Russia to call tender for 2nd Phase of Vostochny Spaceport construction in Fall

NASA sounding rocket launches into Alaskan night

Russia to check space flight engines over faulty parts

ICE WORLD
Swirling spirals at the north pole of Mars

Similar-Looking Ridges on Mars Have Diverse Origins

Commercial Crew's Role in Path to Mars

Meteorite reveals 2 billion years of volcanic activity on Mars

ICE WORLD
China looks to Mars, Jupiter exploration

China's first cargo spacecraft to leave factory

China launches commercial rocket mission Kuaizhou-1A

China Space Plan to Develop "Strength and Size"

ICE WORLD
Iridium Adds Eighth Launch with SpaceX for Satellite Rideshare

Space, Ukrainian-style: Through Crisis to Revival

ESA Planetary Science Archive gets a new look

Iridium-1 NEXT Launched on a Falcon 9

ICE WORLD
New material that contracts when heated holds great industrial potential

Flipping the switch on ammonia production

Understanding breakups

Aavid Thermacore Europe's technology will keep solar satellite cool

ICE WORLD
Dedicated Planet Imager Opens Its Eyes to Other Worlds

New planet imager delivers first science at Keck

First footage of a living stylodactylid shrimp filter-feeding at depth of 4826m

SF State astronomer searches for signs of life on Wolf 1061 exoplanet

ICE WORLD
New Horizons Refines Course for Next Flyby

It's Never 'Groundhog Day' at Jupiter

Public to Choose Jupiter Picture Sites for NASA Juno

Experiment resolves mystery about wind flows on Jupiter




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement