Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
3-D printing techniques help surgeons carve new ears
by Staff Writers
Seattle WA (SPX) Oct 06, 2015


In the study, experienced surgeons preferred carving the UW's models (in white) over a more expensive material made of dental impression material (in blue). Image courtesy University of Washington. For a larger version of this image please go here.

When surgical residents need to practice a complicated procedure to fashion a new ear for children without one, they typically get a bar of soap, carrot or an apple. To treat children with a missing or under-developed ear, experienced surgeons harvest pieces of rib cartilage from the child and carve them into the framework of a new ear. They take only as much of that precious cartilage as they need.

That leaves medical residents without an authentic material to practice on, as vegetables are a pale substitute. Some use pig or adult cadaver ribs, but children's ribs are a different size and consistency.

Now, a collaboration between a University of Washington otolaryngology resident and bioengineering student has used 3-D printing to create a low-cost pediatric rib cartilage model that more closely resembles the feel of real cartilage and allows for realistic surgical practice. The innovation could open the door for aspiring surgeons to become proficient in the sought-after but challenging procedure.

Their results are described in an abstract presented this week at the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery conference in Dallas.

"It's a huge advantage over what we're using today," said lead author Angelique Berens, a UW School of Medicine otolaryngology - head and neck surgery resident. "You literally take a bar of Lever 2000 while the attending is operating and you carve ear cartilage. It does teach you how to get the shape right, but the properties are not super accurate - you can't bend it, and sewing it is not very lifelike."

As part of the study, three experienced surgeons practiced carving, bending and suturing the UW team's silicone models, which were produced from a 3-D printed mold modeled from a CT scan of an 8-year-old patient. They compared their firmness, feel and suturing quality to real rib cartilage, as well as a more expensive material made out of dental impression material.

All three surgeons preferred the UW models, and all recommended introducing them as a training tool for surgeons and surgeons-in-training.

Kathleen Sie, a UW Medicine professor of otolaryngology - head and neck surgery and director of the Childhood Communication Center at Seattle Children's, said the lack of adequate training models makes it difficult for people to become comfortable performing the delicate and technical procedure, which is called auricular reconstruction.

There's typically a six- to 12-month waiting list for children to have the procedure done at Seattle Children's, she said.

"It's a surgery that more people could do, but this is often the single biggest roadblock," Sie said. "They're hesitant to start because they've never carved an ear before. As many potatoes and apples as I've carved, it's still not the same."

Another advantage is that because the UW models are printed from a CT scan, they mimic an individual's unique anatomy. That offers the opportunity for even an experienced surgeon to practice a particular or tricky surgery ahead of time on a patient-specific rib model.

Co-author Sharon Newman, who graduated from the UW with a bioengineering degree in June, teamed up with Berens while they both worked in the UW BioRobotics Lab under electrical engineering professor Blake Hannaford.

Newman figured out how to upload and process a CT scan through a series of free, open-source modeling and imaging programs, and ultimately use a 3-D printer to print a negative mold of a patient's ribs.

Newman had previously tested different combinations of silicone, corn starch, mineral oil and glycerin to replicate human tissue that the lab's surgical robot could manipulate. She poured them into the molds and let them cure to see which mixture most closely resembled rib cartilage.

"I would go to the craft store and Home Depot and say I want to make models - what aisle should I go to?" said Newman. "It turns out a lot of these ideas were based off of materials people use for arts and crafts like rings or other jewelry."

The team's next steps are to get the models into the hands of surgeons and surgeons-in-training, and hopefully to demonstrate that more lifelike practice models can elevate their skills and abilities.

"With one 3-D printed mold, you can make a billion of these models for next to nothing," said Berens. "What this research shows is that we can move forward with one of these models and start using it."

Co-authors include Craig Murakami, UW clinical associate professor and Virginia Mason Medical Center otolaryngologist - head and neck surgeon and facial plastic surgeon, and David A. Zopf, assistant professor of otolaryngology - head and neck surgery at the University of Michigan.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of Washington
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
TECH SPACE
ORNL integrated energy demo connects 3-D printed building, vehicle
Oak Ridge TN (SPX) Sep 25, 2015
A research demonstration unveiled at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory combines clean energy technologies into a 3D-printed building and vehicle to showcase a new approach to energy use, storage and consumption. The Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration, displayed at DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Industry Day event, is ... read more


TECH SPACE
Lunar Pox

Space startup confirms plans for robotic moon landings

Asteroids found to be the moon's main 'water supply'

Russian scientist hope to get rocket fuel, water, oxygen from Lunar ice

TECH SPACE
NASA unveils missing pieces in journey to Mars

Curiosity Rover Team Confirms Ancient Lakes on Mars

MRO imagery reveals Red Planet's stressed substrate

Geology Award Going to Mars Landing Site Expert at JPL

TECH SPACE
NASA Tournament Lab to collaborate on human habitation in space

NASA Prepares to Test Orion Service Module

NASA announces Challenge for Methods of Assessing Damage to Space Suits

Selected NASA Discovery Missions Include Three With PSI Ties

TECH SPACE
Latest Mars film bespeaks potential of China-U.S. space cooperation

Exhibition on "father of Chinese rocketry" opens in U.S.

The First Meeting of the U.S.-China Space Dialogue

China's new carrier rocket succeeds in 1st trip

TECH SPACE
Meet the International Docking Adapter

NASA extends Boeing contract for International Space Station

Russian launches cargo spaceship to the ISS

Successful re-entry of H-II Transfer Vehicle Kounotori5

TECH SPACE
Both passengers for next Ariane 5 mission arrive in French Guiana

Arianespace signs ARSAT to launch a new satellite for Argentina

Ariane 5 orbits Sky Muster and ARSAT-2

A satellite launcher for the Middle East

TECH SPACE
Mysterious ripples found racing through planet-forming disc

The Most Stable Source of Light in the World

Earth-class planets likely have protective magnetic fields, aiding life

Stellar atmosphere can be used to predict the composition of rocky exoplanets

TECH SPACE
More students earning statistics degrees - but not enough

3-D printing techniques help surgeons carve new ears

Caution: Shrinks when warm

Flipping molecular attachments amps up activity of CO2 catalyst




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement