Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















EXO LIFE
We'll Leave the Lights on for You
by Staff Writers
Santa Barbara CA (SPX) May 18, 2016


Philip Lubin. Image courtesy Sonia Fernandez. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Looking up at the night sky - expansive and seemingly endless, stars and constellations blinking and glimmering like jewels just out of reach - it's impossible not to wonder: Are we alone?

For many of us, the notion of intelligent life on other planets is as captivating as ideas come. Maybe in some other star system, maybe a billion light-years away, there's a civilization like ours asking the exact same question. Imagine if we sent up a visible signal that could eventually be seen across the entire universe. Imagine if another civilization did the same.

The technology now exists to enable exactly that scenario, according to UC Santa Barbara physics professor Philip Lubin, whose new work applies his research and advances in directed-energy systems to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). His recent paper "The Search for Directed Intelligence" appears in the journal REACH - Reviews in Human Space Exploration.

"If even one other civilization existed in our galaxy and had a similar or more advanced level of directed-energy technology, we could detect 'them' anywhere in our galaxy with a very modest detection approach," said Lubin, who leads the UCSB Experimental Cosmology Group. "If we scale it up as we're doing with direct energy systems, how far could we detect a civilization equivalent to ours? The answer becomes that the entire universe is now open to us.

"Similar to the use of directed energy for relativistic interstellar probes and planetary defense that we have been developing, take that same technology and ask yourself, 'What are consequences of that technology in terms of us being detectable by another 'us' in some other part of the universe?'" Lubin added.

"Could we see each other? Can we behave as a lighthouse, or a beacon, and project our presence to some other civilization somewhere else in the universe? The profound consequences are, of course, 'Where are they?' Perhaps they are shy like us and do not want to be seen, or they don't transmit in a way we can detect, or perhaps 'they' do not exist."

The same directed energy technology is at the core of Lubin's recent efforts to develop minuscule, laser-powered interstellar spacecraft. That work, funded since 2015 by NASA (and just selected by the space agency for "Phase II" support) is the technology behind billionaire Yuri Milner's news-making, $100-million Breakthrough Starshot initiative announced April 12.

Lubin is a scientific advisor on Starshot, which is using his NASA research as a roadmap as it seeks to send tiny spacecraft to nearby star systems.

In describing directed energy, Lubin likened the process to using the force of water from a garden hose to push a ball forward. Using a laser light, spacecraft can be pushed and steered in much the same way. Applied to SETI, he said, the directed energy system could be deployed to send a targeted signal to other planetary systems.

"In our paper, we propose a search strategy that will observe nearly 100 billion planets, allowing us to test our hypothesis that other similarly or more advanced civilizations with this same broadcast capability exist," Lubin said.

"As a species we are evolving rapidly in photonics, the production and manipulation of light," he explained. "Our recent paper explores the hypothesis: We now have the ability to produce light extremely efficiently, and perhaps other species might also have that ability. And if so, then what would be the implications of that? This paper explores the 'if so, then what?'"

Traditionally and still, Lubin said, the "mainstay of the SETI community" has been to conduct searches via radio waves. Think Jodie Foster in "Contact," receiving an extraterrestrial signal by way of a massive and powerful radio telescope. With Lubin's UCSB-developed photonics approach, however, making "contact" could be much simpler: Take the right pictures and see if any distant systems are beaconing us.

"All discussions of SETI have to have a significant level of, maybe not humor, but at least hubris as to what makes reason and what doesn't," Lubin said. "Maybe we are alone in terms of our technological capability. Maybe all that's out there is bacteria or viruses. We have no idea because we've never found life outside of our Earth.

"But suppose there is a civilization like ours and suppose - unlike us, who are skittish about broadcasting our presence - they think it's important to be a beacon, an interstellar or extragalactic lighthouse of sorts," he added.

"There is a photonics revolution going on on Earth that enables this specific kind of transmission of information via visible or near-infrared light of high intensity. And you don't need a large telescope to begin these searches. You could detect a presence like our current civilization anywhere in our galaxy, where there are 100 billion possible planets, with something in your backyard.

"Put in context, and we would love to have people really think about this: You can literally go out with your camera from Costco, take pictures of the sky, and if you knew what you were doing you could mount a SETI search in your backyard. The lighthouse is that bright."

Research paper: "The Search for Directed Intelligence," Philip Lubin, 2016, REACH - Reviews in Human Space Exploration

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University Of California, Santa Barbara
Life Beyond Earth
Lands Beyond Beyond - extra solar planets - news and science






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
EXO LIFE
Natural Causes, Not Aliens, Explain Mystery Star's Behavior
Nashville TN (SPX) May 11, 2016
Sorry, E.T. lovers, but the results of a new study make it far less likely that KIC 8462852, popularly known as Tabby's star, is the home of industrious aliens who are gradually enclosing it in a vast shell called a Dyson sphere. Public interest in the star, which sits about 1,480 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus, began last fall when Yale astronomer Tabetha ("Tabby") Boyajian ... read more


EXO LIFE
NASA research gives new insights into how the Moon got inked

First rocket made ready for launch at Vostochny spaceport

Supernova iron found on the moon

Russia to shift all Lunar launches to Vostochny Cosmodrome

EXO LIFE
AAC Microtec to develop miniaturized motion controller for space rovers and robots

Mars Rover Scientist Hopes to Find More Evidence of Liquid Water on the Red Planet

The rise and fall of Martian lakes

Opportunity microscopic imaging camera back to normal operations

EXO LIFE
Interns Make Archived NASA Planetary Science Data More Accessible

Out of this world: 'Moon and Mars veggies' grow in Dutch greenhouse

NASA Invests in Next Stage of Visionary Technology Development

NASA makes dozens of patents available in public domain

EXO LIFE
China, U.S. hold first dialogue on outer space safety

Long March-7 rocket delivered to launch site

China's space technology extraordinary, impressive says Euro Space Center director

China can meet Chile's satellite needs: ambassador

EXO LIFE
ISS completes 100,000th orbit of Earth: mission control

Canadian astronaut to join ISS in 2018

NASA, Space Station partners announce future mission crew members

New landing date for ESA astronaut Tim Peake

EXO LIFE
Russia Spent $1.3Bln on Vostochny Cosmodrome So Far

Pre-launch processing is underway with Indonesia's BRIsat for the next Arianespace heavy-lift flight

New Antares Rocket Rolls Out at NASA Wallops

First work platforms powered tested in VAB for Space Launch System

EXO LIFE
Star Has Four Mini-Neptunes Orbiting in Lock Step

Exoplanets' Orbits Point to Planetary Migration

Synchronized planets reveal clues to planet formation

Kepler space telescope finds another 1284 exo planets

EXO LIFE
Lockheed, Indra conduct test of new radar system

Scientists take a major leap toward a 'perfect' quantum metamaterial

UW team first to measure microscale granular crystal dynamics

Self-healing, flexible electronic material restores functions after many breaks




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement