24/7 Space News  





. Webb Slinger Heads To Washington

During the second week in May, visitors to the Nation's Capitol will be able to see the life-sized model of NASA's latest "superhero," and get a picture taken next to it. The model will be assembled on May 9, and will be on display through May 12 in front of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on the National Mall, Washington.
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) May 05, 2007
This May, there will be more than one "web slinger" coming to town. In addition to the superhero, who will make his third movie appearance, NASA has its own "Webb" slinger - the James Webb Space Telescope. The Webb space telescope will be much larger than the Hubble Space Telescope, its predecessor. A life-sized model of the "Webb" telescope is coming to the National Mall, Washington.

The James Webb telescope will be able to look back to the beginning of time. It will find the first galaxies and will peer through dusty clouds to see stars forming planetary systems, connecting the Milky Way to our own Solar System. Launch is scheduled for 2013.

"There's more than just one similarity between the web-slinging superhero and the James Webb telescope," said John Decker, Deputy Associate Director for the James Webb Space Telescope Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. "The sunshield on the spacecraft is actually shaped like a giant spider web, when you look at it from the top."

During the second week in May, visitors to the Nation's Capitol will be able to see the life-sized model of NASA's latest "superhero," and get a picture taken next to it. The model will be assembled on May 9, and will be on display through May 12 in front of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on the National Mall, Washington.

NASA and Northrop Grumman, the contractor who built the model, will set up information booths next to the model, where visitors can get information and educational materials, and speak with people who are involved in the project to build the real James Webb Space Telescope.

The full-scale telescope model was built to give the viewing public a better understanding of the size, scale and complexity of this breakthrough satellite. Specifically designed for an environment subject to gravity and weather, the model is constructed mainly of aluminum and steel, weighs 12,000 lbs., and is approximately 80 feet long, 40 feet wide and 40 feet tall.

A specially manufactured material imported from France called "Ferrari Precontraint" allows the sunshield to 'breathe.' The model requires 2 trucks for shipping, and assembly takes a crew of 12 approximately four days.

The telescope model has been "Webb-slinging" since 2005 to Seattle, Wash.; Colorado Springs, Colo.; Paris, France; Greenbelt, Md.; Rochester, N.Y.; and Orlando, Fla. Funds used to build this model were provided solely by Northrop Grumman.

The model display is part of "Public Service Recognition Week 2007," which runs from May 10 through 13. The theme of the week is "Safety, Science, Security, Technology." This annual national event is sponsored by the Council for Excellence in Government, Employees Roundtable, and it honors men and women who serve America in the Federal, state and local governments.

Email This Article

Related Links
James Webb Space Telescope
Space Telescope News and Technology at Skynightly.com




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


hello world
NASA Review Board Validates New Technologies On James Webb Space Telescope
Redondo Beach CA (SPX) May 03, 2007
All ten new technologies developed for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) are mature enough to move into the detailed engineering phase. Northrop Grumman is the prime contractor, leading an industry team in the Webb's design and development under contract to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Subcommittee Examines Key Challenges Confronting NASA Space Science Program
  • New Breed of Architects Specializes In Off-Planet Living
  • Star Trek Star Scotty Rockets Into Space In Final Journey
  • Student Engineering Team Headed For Near-Weightless Nasa Flight To Test Gyroscopic Robotic Arm

  • Mars Rover Spirit Finds Evidence Of Ancient Volcanic Explosion
  • COROT Discovers Its First Exoplanet And Catches Scientists By Surprise
  • Opportunity Gets A Boost Of Energy And Continues Imaging
  • Depth-To-Ice Map Of A Southern Mars Site Near Melea Planum

  • Ariane 5 Launches Twin GEO Birds
  • Lockheed Martin-Built Astra 1L Satellite Ready For Launch
  • Arianespace And Japan Continue To Build Long-Term Relationship
  • UP Aerospace Announces Successful Space Flight

  • Volcanic Eruptions In Kamchatka
  • NASA Satellite Captures Image Of Georgia Wildfires
  • US Earth-Observing Satellites In Jeopardy
  • Exploring Caves From 30 Feet In The Air

  • Rosetta And New Horizons Watch Jupiter In Joint Campaign
  • New Horizons Shows Off Its Color Camera In Io Image
  • Alice Views Jupiter And Io
  • A Look From LEISA

  • New VERITAS Telescope Array May Help Find Dark Matter
  • Hubble Sees Multiple Star Generations In A Globular Cluster
  • Spitzer Spies Jet-Setting Stars
  • Climate Catastrophes In The Solar System

  • US Rejected Russian Request For Joint Moon Program
  • Longest Holiday In Space Ends As Russia Touts Lunar Tour Within Five Years
  • Back To The Moon For Some Reconnaissance
  • Rochester Triumphs In NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

  • GIOVE-A Transmits First Navigation Message
  • EU To Consider Taking Over Galileo Satellite System
  • GLONASS Potential Still To Be Realised
  • Galileo Masters 2007 Issues Call For Ideas In Satellite Navigation

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement