Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
Upgrade to offer power boost to world's brightest X-ray laser
by Brooks Hays
Menlo Park, Calif. (UPI) Apr 5, 2016


disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only

The X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is getting a second laser beam, this one 10,000 times brighter than the first. At a million pulses per second, the new beam will also be able to fire 8,000 times faster.

The upgrade project is called LCLS-II, and is expected to offer a tremendous power boost to the SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source.

"LCLS-II will take X-ray science to the next level, opening the door to a whole new range of studies of the ultrafast and ultrasmall," Mike Dunne, the project's director, said in a news release. "This will tremendously advance our ability to develop transformative technologies of the future, including novel electronics, life-saving drugs and innovative energy solutions."

The new power will enable scientists to study atomic processes across a greater energy scale. Scientists use the Linac Coherent Light Source to excite particles in myriad ways and capture their reactions across very small timescales.

These moving atomic particle pictures reveal unique processes like the formation and fragmentation of chemical bonds or molecular restructuring during a phase change.

LCLS's laser beam is generated by propelling electrons through a tunnel lined with magnets, known as an undulator. The electrons, traveling at close to the speed of light, zigzag their way down the tunnel, giving off X-rays as they bounce.

The new laser beam tunnel will feature niobium metal cavities, which when cooled don't sacrifice any energy as they bounce the electrons down the undulator. The result is a brighter, faster beam.

"The upgrade will benefit X-ray experiments in many different ways, and I'm very excited to use the new capabilities for my own research," said Peter Weber, a professor of physics at Brown University. "With LCLS-II, we'll be able to bring the motions of atoms much more into focus, which will help us better understand the dynamics of crucial chemical reactions."

Stanford University operates the SLAC for the Department of Energy's Office of Science.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
TECH SPACE
Light helps the transistor laser switch faster
Champaign IL (SPX) Mar 18, 2016
Light and electrons interact in a complex dance within fiber optic devices. A new study by University of Illinois engineers found that in the transistor laser, a device for next-generation high-speed computing, the light and electrons spur one another on to faster switching speeds than any devices available. Milton Feng, the Nick Holonyak Jr. Emeritus Chair in electrical and computer engin ... read more


TECH SPACE
Moon Mission: A Blueprint for the Red Planet

The Lunar Race That Isn't

Earth's moon wandered off axis billions of years ago

Ancient Polar Ice Reveals Tilting of Earth's Moon

TECH SPACE
Opportunity moves to new locations to the southwest

NASA: Manned mission to Mars still 'long way' off

Mars Express keeps watch on frosty Martian valleys

HiRISE: 45,000 Mars Orbits and Counting

TECH SPACE
New DNA/RNA Tool to Diagnose, Treat Diseases

ASU to develop the next generation science education courseware for NASA

Space-Related Budget Requests for FY17

NASA Selects American Small Business, Research Institution Projects for Continued Development

TECH SPACE
China's 1st space lab Tiangong-1 ends data service

China's aim to explore Mars

China to establish first commercial rocket launch company

China's ambition after space station

TECH SPACE
Cargo ship reaches space station on resupply run

Unmanned Cygnus cargo ship launches to ISS on resupply run: NASA

Cygnus Set to Deliver Its Largest Load of Station Science, Cargo

Three new members join crew of International Space Station

TECH SPACE
Roscosmos Says Reports on Sea Launch Project Sale Might Be True

India to launch 22 satellites by single rocket in May

NASA's 'Spaceport of the Future' Reaches Another Milestone

MHI signs H-IIA launch deal for UAE Mars mission

TECH SPACE
Map of rocky exoplanet reveals a lava world

Instrument Team Selected to Build Next-Gen Planet Hunter

Oddball planet raises questions about origins of 'hot Jupiters'

Investigating the Mystery of Migrating 'Hot Jupiters'

TECH SPACE
How to make metal alloys that stand up to hydrogen

More efficient system for the synthesis of organic compounds

Study finds metal foam handles heat better than steel

Physicists 'undiscovered' technetium carbide




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement