Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















CARBON WORLDS
The significance of seaweed
by Staff Writers
Thuwal Saudi Arabia (SPX) Sep 19, 2016


File image.

Our understanding of the global carbon cycle has been reshaped by KAUST researchers who have helped to reveal a major role for the abundance of seaweed growing around the world's coasts.

Some years ago, Carlos Duarte, now director of the Red Sea Research Center at KAUST, was among the first scientists to establish that marine vegetation plays a major role in the movement of carbon through the environment and all living organisms. The dominant players in the waters of coastal zones are macroalgae - more commonly known as seaweeds, such as kelp and sargassum.

Now Duarte and Dorte Krause-Jensen from Aarhus University in Denmark have reviewed and quantified the role of macroalgae in trapping carbon. Their estimate is a highly significant 173 trillion grams of carbon sequestered in coastal seaweed, globally, per year1.

"Marine macroalgae have largely been excluded from discussion of marine carbon sinks," says Duarte. He explains that this is due to neglecting the accumulation of macroalgae in deep-sea sediments. His latest review suggests that around 90 percent of global sequestration of carbon by macroalgae could be due to the transport of this vegetation into the deep sea.

The researchers propose two main mechanisms for this transport - seaweed drifting through under-sea canyons and deposition by sinking when the marine vegetation loses its natural buoyancy.

"These processes in many vegetated coastal habitats sequester ten times more carbon dioxide per hectare than a hectare of Amazonian forest," says Duarte. This highlights the significance of seaweed when compared to a habitat often used as a carbon sink yardstick in discussions about climate change .

"Understanding the major carbon sinks in the biosphere is of paramount importance to identify where there are management opportunities to mitigate climate change," says Duarte. He explains that understanding where carbon goes provides opportunities for potential interventions that absorb more of the carbon dioxide that human activity releases into the atmosphere.

This latest analysis adds to other recent insights into carbon sequestration gained by Duarte and his colleagues, including new understanding of the role of marine bacteria, and of hydrocarbons deposited into the ocean from the atmosphere (see related articles).

Duarte now plans to use advanced techniques to identify and quantify the significance of macroalgal carbon deposition in existing sediments. One tool will be DNA analysis, which can reveal which species contributed to the carbon in sediments.

The global importance of climate change makes such work vital for planning effective management of the planet.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
Carbon Worlds - where graphite, diamond, amorphous, fullerenes meet






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
CARBON WORLDS
Diamonds are a millennial's best friend, say De Beers
Hong Kong (AFP) Sept 14, 2016
Slower growth in China and economic turbulence in global markets has dented the diamond industry, but millennials are offering light at the end of tunnel, say De Beers. In its new 'Diamond Insight Report', which looks at the state of the sector worldwide, the firm predicted volatility would be the "new normal" over the next 10 years. The value of global diamond jewellery sales to consum ... read more


CARBON WORLDS
Space tourists eye $150mln Soyuz lunar flyby

Roscosmos to spend $7.5Mln studying issues of manned lunar missions

Lockheed Martin, NASA Ink Deal for SkyFire Infrared Lunar Discovery Satellite

As dry as the moon

CARBON WORLDS
Opportunity departs Marathon Valley to head deeper into Endeavour Crater

Mars Rover Views Spectacular Layered Rock Formations

Storm Reduces Available Solar Energy on Opportunity

NASA Approves 2018 Launch of Mars InSight Mission

CARBON WORLDS
Astronaut returns home after logging record-breaking 534 days in space

'Star Trek' 50-year mission: to show the best of humanity

Vietnam's 'Silicon Valley' sparks startup boom

Taiwan tourism industry hit by drop in Chinese visitors

CARBON WORLDS
China's second space lab Tiangong-2 to be launched

Kuang-Chi near space test flight set for 2016

Vigil for Tiangong 2

Tiangong 2 is coming soon, real soon

CARBON WORLDS
US astronauts complete spacewalk for ISS maintenance

Space Station's orbit adjusted Wednesday

Astronauts Relaxing Before Pair of Spaceships Leave

'New port of call' installed at space station

CARBON WORLDS
What Happened to Sea Launch

SpaceX scours data to try to pin down cause rocket explosion on launch pad

India To Launch 5 Satellites In September

With operational acceptance complete, Western Range is ready for launch

CARBON WORLDS
New light on the complex nature of 'hot Jupiter' atmospheres

Discovery one-ups Tatooine, finds twin stars hosting three giant exoplanets

Could Proxima Centauri b Really Be Habitable

Rocky planet found orbiting habitable zone of nearest star

CARBON WORLDS
Deriving inspiration from the dragon tree

Developing composites that self-heal at very low temperatures

UMD physicists discover 'smoke rings' made of laser light

New material to revolutionize water proofing




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement