Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Soldiers and Families Can Suffer Negative Effects from Modern Communication Technologies
by Staff Writers
Columbia MO (SPX) Mar 21, 2013


Israel Defense Forces soldiers send a quick text message before being ordered to turn off their phones. Credit: Israeli Defense Forces Spokesperson's Unit.

As recently as the Vietnam and Korean wars, soldiers' families commonly had to wait months to receive word from family members on the front lines. Now, cell phones and the internet allow deployed soldiers and their families to communicate instantly.

However, along with the benefits of keeping in touch, using new communication technologies can have negative consequences for both soldiers and their families, according to a study by University of Missouri researcher Brian Houston. This research could lead to guidelines for how active military personnel and their families can best use modern communications.

"Deployed soldiers and their families should be aware that newer methods of communication, especially texting, can have unintended impacts," said Houston, assistant professor of communication in the College of Arts and Science.

"The brevity and other limitations of text messages often limit the emotional content of a message. The limited emotional cues in text messages or email increases the potential for misunderstandings and hurt feelings. For example, children may interpret a deployed parent's brief, terse text message negatively, when the nature of the message may have been primarily the result of the medium or the situation."

Houston's study documented the frequency and quality of communications between soldiers and their families then examined how those results were associated with the emotions and behaviors of military children and spouses. Children who had the greatest degree of communication with a deployed parent also showed the greatest number of behavioral problems and emotional troubles.

Houston suggested this may be because when kids are having a hard time they may be most likely to reach out to a deployed parent. However, that can cause a conflict for the soldier between the roles of warrior and parent.

"Bad news from home can distract a soldier from their duties and double their stress load," said Houston. "A soldier can end up dealing with both the strain of warfare and concerns about a distant child."

On the other hand, children with a deployed parent who talked about deployment with a brother or sister tended to exhibit positive outcomes, according to the study. Houston suggested this shows the importance of children experiencing parental deployment having an opportunity to connect with other children in the same situation.

Houston suggested parents experiencing deployment may wish to identify opportunities for their children to connect with other young people whose parents serve in the military.

The problems with communications between soldiers and their families weren't limited to the time during deployment. Distinct challenges arose before, during and after deployment, according to the study. Upon returning home, soldier-parents faced difficulties in communicating their experiences from wartime with their families.

"Children can tell when a parent is troubled," said Houston. "For soldiers stressed by memories of war or readjustment to civilian life, it helps to talk to children about what is going on.

"Obviously you do not want to overwhelm children with information that is not age appropriate, but if a parent is having difficulties and no one is talking about it, then children may often feel that they are in some way to blame for the parent's situation or that the parent is angry with them."

Houston plans to use this research to develop communication best practices for military personnel and their families. Houston hopes such guidelines can help military families utilize modern communication technologies to help cope with deployment and the subsequent return to civilian life.

The study, "Family Communication Across the Military Deployment Experience: Child and Spouse Report of Communication Frequency and Quality and Associated Emotions, Behaviors, and Reactions," was published in the Journal of Loss and Trauma: International Perspectives on Stress and Coping.

Co-authors were Betty Pfefferbaum and Michael Brand of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Michelle Sherman of the Oklahoma City Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Ashley Melson Family Development and Intervention Services.

.


Related Links
University of Missouri
Read the latest in Military Space Communications Technology at SpaceWar.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
DARPA Seeks More Robust Military Wireless Networks
Washington DC (SPX) Mar 20, 2013
In areas lacking trustworthy communications infrastructure, deployed servicemembers rely on wireless devices to perform double duty: they not only provide access to the network; they are the network. Protocols for these networks require nodes to coordinate among themselves to manage resources, such as spectrum and power, and determine the best configurations to enable sharing of information. ... read more


MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
NASA's LRO Sees GRAIL's Explosive Farewell

Amazon's Bezos recovers Apollo 11 engines

Leaping Lunar Dust

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project Seeks Public Support To Retrieve Apollo Era Moon Images

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Sun in the Way Will Affect Mars Missions in April

ChemCam data abundant at Planetary Conference

Los Alamos science sleuth on the trail of a Martian mystery

Curiosity Rover Exits 'Safe Mode'

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
NASA Voyager Status Update on Voyager 1 Location

Voyager 1 has entered a new region of space

NASA denies report that Voyager left solar system

Reproduction In Zero Gravity

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Shenzhou 10 - Next Stop: Jiuquan

China's fourth space launch center to be in use in two years

China to launch new manned spacecraft

Woman expected again to join next China crew roster

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
ESA seeks innovators for orbiting laboratory

New ISS crew prepares for launch

Space crew returns to Earth from ISS

Canadian commands space station for first time

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Sea Launch and EchoStar Reach Preliminary Agreement for Launch Services

Estonia's student cubesat satellite is ready for the next Vega launch

Vega receives its upper stage as the next mission's two primary passengers land in French Guiana

Grasshopper Successfully Completes 80M Hover Slam

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Astronomers Detect Water in Atmosphere of Distant Planet

Distant planetary system is a super-sized solar system

Water signature in distant planet shows clues to its formation

The Great Exoplanet Debate

MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS
Smartphone app turns home drone into spacecraft

Scientists claim new glasses-free 3D for cellphone

NASA Awards Astrotech Contract For SMAP Spacecraft Processing

Videogame power harnessed for positive goals




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement