Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ROBO SPACE
Sensitivity to time improves performance at remotely controlling devices
by Staff Writers
Raleigh NC (SPX) Oct 09, 2017


illustration only

A new study from North Carolina State University finds that people who are more sensitive to the passage of time are better at accounting for the latency - or time lag - inherent in remotely controlling robots or other tools.

"There are many situations, from bomb disposal to remote surgeries, in which people want to remotely control devices," says Federico Scholcover, a Ph.D. student at NC State and lead author of a paper on the work.

"However, the longer the lag time between when users issue a command and when they see the results of that command, the longer it takes them to perform a task and the more errors they make.

"We wanted to know if an individual's sensitivity to changes in time affects their ability to cope with this latency - and their resulting performance."

For this study, researchers had 22 participants perform two tasks. One task was designed to test an individual's sensitivity to changes in time. The second task was to maneuver a remotely controlled car through a prescribed course.

The second task was performed eight times, with users dealing with four different lag times ranging from 400 milliseconds to one second. Researchers assessed how long it took participants to complete the driving course, as well as how many errors they made - such as steering the car off the course.

The researchers found that individuals with greater time sensitivity were no faster than their counterparts at completing the course, but they made far fewer mistakes.

"For example, there was a speed/error tradeoff for everyone - the faster you went, the more mistakes you made," Scholcover says. "But the most sensitive participants would make an average of 3.5 errors per minute, whereas the less sensitive participants made an average of 6.1 errors per minute.

"We also found that participants who were more sensitive took slightly longer pauses - 0.2 seconds longer - between issuing commands to the remotely controlled vehicles."

"We're not entirely sure why time sensitivity improves performance, but it is possible that improved timing may help people estimate the extent of movement by the remotely controlled car," says Doug Gillan, a professor of psychology at NC State and co-author of the paper.

"Next steps include exploring this subject in more detail, such as a more fine-grained analysis of errors and testing different remotely controlled tasks," Scholcover says. "It would also be interesting to determine if one can improve one's sensitivity to changes in time, which could in turn - presumably - improve an individual's remote operation performance."

The paper, "Using Temporal Sensitivity to Predict Performance Under Latency in Teleoperation," is published in the journal Human Factors.

ROBO SPACE
Mattel scraps plan for digital assistant for kids
Washington (AFP) Oct 5, 2017
US toy giant Mattel said Thursday it was cancelling its plan to deliver an artificial intelligence-infused digital speaker for children, following complaints from privacy groups and lawmakers. The device called Aristotle was announced in January during the Consumer Electronics Show as a kid-friendly alternative to digital assistants such as Amazon's Alexa-powered speakers and Google Home, an ... read more

Related Links
North Carolina State University
All about the robots on Earth and beyond!


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

ROBO SPACE
Fast-moving space industries create new ethical challenges

Space Cooperation Between China, Russia Needs Long-Term Mechanism

NASA's New Hubble E-Book Series Dives into the Solar System and Beyond

Mapping NASA's Space Missions

ROBO SPACE
Arianespace to launch COSMO-SkyMed satellites manufactured by Thales

Arianespace signs contract for 10 Vega and Vega C launchers

Launch Vehicle and Missile Ascent Trajectories

Ariane 5 rocket puts satellites into orbit on second attempt

ROBO SPACE
Lockheed Martin unveils reusable water-powered Mars lander

SpaceX's Musk unveils plan to reach Mars by 2022

Research sheds new light on how Earth and Mars were created

The Mars 2020 Rover features new spectral abilities with its new SuperCam

ROBO SPACE
Mars probe to carry 13 types of payload on 2020 mission

China's cargo spacecraft separates from Tiangong-2 space lab

Work on China's mission to Mars 'well underway'

Chinese company eyes development of reusable launch vehicle

ROBO SPACE
GomSpace and Luxembourg to develop space activities in the Grand Duchy

SSL-Built Satellite for AsiaSat Begins Post-Launch Maneuvers According to Plan

The ESA 500: fostering start-up companies to use space technology on Earth

Thomas calls for new comprehensive Australian Space Agency at IAC address

ROBO SPACE
Electrically heated textiles now possible via UMass Amherst research

Unexpected discovery leads to new theory of liquid streaming

Atomistic simulations go the distance on metal strength

Surfactants have surprising effect on nanobubble stability

ROBO SPACE
Glenn Tests Thruster Bound for Metal World

Searching for Distant Worlds With a Flying Telescope

Scientists propose new concept of terrestrial planet formation

The return of the comet-like exoplanet

ROBO SPACE
Solving the Mystery of Pluto's Giant Blades of Ice

Global Aerospace Corporation to present Pluto lander concept to NASA

Pluto features given first official names

Hibernation Over, New Horizons Continues Kuiper Belt Cruise




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement