Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




TECH SPACE
Scientists achieve major breakthrough in thin-film magnetism
by Staff Writers
Singapore (SPX) Aug 18, 2015


File image: hard disk.

Magnetism in nanoscale layers only a few tens of atoms thick is one of the foundations of the big data revolution - for example, all the information we download from the internet is stored magnetically on hard disks in server farms dotted across the World. Recent work by a team of scientists working in Singapore, The Netherlands, USA and Ireland, published on 14 August 2015 in the prestigious journal, Science, has uncovered a new twist to the story of thin-film magnetism.

The team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) - Mr Li Changjian, a graduate student from the NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, Assistant Professor Ariando and Professor T Venky Venkatesan - led to the discovery of this new magnetic phenomenon by growing perfectly-crystalline atomic layers of a manganite, an oxide of lanthanum and manganese {LaMnO3}, on a substrate crystal of nonmagnetic strontium titanate using a method - pulsed laser deposition - developed many years ago for high-temperature superconductors and multicomponent materials by Prof Venkatesan, who now heads the NUS Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Institute (NUSNNI).

The manganite is an antiferromagnet when it is atomically thin and shows no magnetism. The new discovery is that its magnetism is switched on abruptly when the number of Manganese atomic layers changes from 5 to 6 or more. The conjecture is that this arises from an avalanche of electrons from the top surface of the film to the bottom, where the electrons are confined near the substrate.

This shift of electric charge occurs as the manganese atomic layers form atomically charged capacitors leading to the build-up of an electric field, known as 'polar catastrophe', inside the manganite. As a consequence of this charge transfer, the manganite layer switches to a strongly ferromagnetic state, as could be visualised by a magnetic microscopy technique called Scanning SQUID Microscopy.

This was conducted by Dr Xiao Renshaw Wang, who is a PhD graduate from NUSNNI, working with Professor Hans Hilgenkamp at the MESA+ Institute of the University of Twente in The Netherlands. The work validates the polar catastrophe model, and it shows how the addition of just one extra atomic layer can transform the magnetism.

The team plans to use local electric fields to controllably turn on/off the magnetism of its 5-layer films, and explore potential applications in microwave devices and magnetic recording. With magnetic memory elements approaching nano dimensions, this technique promises new approaches in magnetic recording and computing.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
National University of Singapore
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Disney Research produces 3D objects with variable elasticity using single material
Glendale CA (SPX) Aug 07, 2015
A 3D-printed teddy bear can have a stiff head, a pliable tummy and bendable arms, even though all of it is made of the same relatively stiff material, using a new method developed by Disney Research. By using the printer to alter the small-scale structure of the material, the Disney researchers showed they could vary its elasticity dramatically within the same object. They developed famili ... read more


TECH SPACE
From a million miles away, NASA camera shows moon crossing face of Earth

Russia to conduct simulated flight program to Moon, Mars over 4 years

NASA Could Return Humans to the Moon by 2021

Smithsonian embraces crowdfunding to preserve lunar spacesuit

TECH SPACE
One Decade after Launch, Mars Orbiter Still Going Strong

Mars Rovers and the Last Moonwalker to Invade Poland in September

Salt flat indicates some of the last vestiges of surface water on Mars

New Online Exploring Tools Bring NASA's Journey to Mars to New Generation

TECH SPACE
First Time Ever: ISS Crew Eats Food Grown in Outer Space

US, Russia, China to Explore Benefits of Outer Space for ASEAN

First bite of space-grown lettuce is 'awesome'

Spaceflight may increase susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease

TECH SPACE
China's space exploration potential has US chasing its own tail

China to deploy space-air-ground sensors for environment protection

Chinese earth station is for exclusively scientific and civilian purposes

Cooperation in satellite technology put Belgium, China to forefront

TECH SPACE
ISS to Open Research Facility for Materials Science Research by 2017

NASA Completes Selection of Crew Members for 2017 ISS Missions

Russian cosmonauts wrap up spacewalk

NASA renews $490M contract with Russian Space Agency

TECH SPACE
ILS concludes Proton launch failure investigation

Intelsat 34 fueled for heavy-lift mission with Ariane 5

India to launch 9 US satellites in 2015, 2016

Payload checkout is advancing for Arianespace's September Soyuz flight

TECH SPACE
Astronomers discover new planet orbiting two stars

Scientists solve planetary ring riddle

Overselling NASA

Exoplanets 20/20: Looking Back to the Future

TECH SPACE
Australia court sides with Internet firms in piracy row

How CubeSats are Revolutionizing Radio Science

Big data analytical advances to exploration of universe

New device converts DC electric field to terahertz radiation




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.