Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















TECH SPACE
Researchers bring eyewear-free 3-D capabilities to small screen
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Nov 02, 2016


File image.

Convertible video displays that offer both 2D and 3D imaging without the need of any eyewear offer greater convenience to users who would otherwise have to keep track of yet another accessory. Such autostereoscopic displays have already hit the TV market, but the underlying technology reveals its limitations at close viewing distances. Viewers typically must view these displays from a distance of around one meter (about three feet), eliminating any practical applicability to the smaller screens of mobile devices.

Researchers at Seoul National University, South Korea, however, have developed a new method of making these convertible displays that not only achieved near-viewing capabilities, but also simplified and shrank the architecture of the technology. In a paper published this week in the journal Optics Express, from The Optical Society (OSA), the researchers describe their novel design.

For eyewear-free displays, the only action is behind the screen where the images' pixels and optics are layered together to produce the stereoscopic effect. The two primary ways of producing these optically illusive effects are by using either an array of micro-lenses, called lenticular lenses, or an array of micro-filters, called parallax barriers, in front of the image to make its appearance depend on the angle at which it is being seen.

The simplest example of this effect is found on a movie poster whose image appears to change as you walk by. Two (or more) images are interlaced and printed behind a plastic layer with grooves matching the interlaced pattern. The grooves act as distinct, interlaced arrays of lenses or filters, revealing one image as you approach the poster and another as you depart, viewing the same poster from a different angle.

In the case of 2D/3D convertible screens, these layers are active, meaning they can be (electronically) switched on or off. The gap distance between the image layer and the barrier layer is a key determinant of the viewing distance. Closer stacking of these layers together allows for a closer viewing distance.

In their paper, Sin-Doo Lee, a professor of electrical engineering at Seoul National University, and his colleagues describe a monolithic structure that effectively combines the active parallax barrier, a polarizing sheet and an image layer into a single panel.

Instead of two separate image and barrier panels, they use a polarizing interlayer with the image layer in direct contact with one side of the interlayer, while the active parallax barrier of a liquid crystal layer is formed on the other side as an array of periodically patterned indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrodes.

The use of this interlayer allows the minimum separation of the image and barrier layers, thus providing the short viewing distance required for the smaller screens of mobile devices.

"The polarizing interlayer approach here will allow high resolution together with design flexibility of the displays, and will be applicable for fabricating other types of displays such as viewing-angle switchable devices," Lee said. "Our technology will definitely benefit display companies in manufacturing low cost and light weight 2D/3D convertible displays for mobile applications. Under mobile environments, the weight is one of the important factors."

This concept not only applies to LC-based 2D/3D displays, but also to OLED-based 2D/3D displays, offering application to a broad range of present and future device designs.

Se-Um Kim, Jiyoon Kim, Jeng-Hun Suh, Jun-Hee Na, and Sin-Doo Lee, "Concept of active parallax barrier on polarizing interlayer for near-viewing autostereoscopic displays," Opt. Express 24, 25010-25018 (2016). DOI: 10.1364/OE.24.025010.


Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
The Optical Society
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
TECH SPACE
You can now print your own 3D model of the universe
London (UPI) Oct 28, 2016
The most comprehensive models of the universe are simulated by supercomputers - not the kind of digital files the travel quickly across the Internet. A new model of the cosmic microwave background, the oldest light in the universe, is a bit more nimble. Researchers at Imperial College London designed and printed a CMB map using a 3D printer. The files are available for anyone to ... read more


TECH SPACE
NavCube could support an X-ray communication test in space

Japan rocket with manga art launches satellite into space

NASA, Navy practice Orion module recovery

Weightless tourism just 4 years away

TECH SPACE
JCSAT-15 arrives in Kourou for Dec Ariane 5 launch

China launches first heavy-lift rocket

Aerojet Rocketdyne completes CST launch abort engine hot fire tests

NASA Uses Tunnel Approach to Study How Heat Affects SLS Rocket

TECH SPACE
'Millions' needed to continue Europe's Mars mission: ESA chief

Six people to spend two weeks in Mars simulation habitat in Poland

Opportunity makes small U-turn to reach summit of Spirit Mound

Schiaparelli crash site in colour

TECH SPACE
Long March-5 reflects China's "greatest advancement" yet in rockets

New heavy-lift carrier rocket boosts China's space dream

Long March-7 being assembled, to transport Tianzhou-1

Kuaizhou-1 scheduled to launch in December

TECH SPACE
Sun-observing MinXSS CubeSat to yield insights into solar flare energetics

Optus achieves full certification of 4 teleports

ISRO's World record bid: Launching 83 satellites on single rocket

Shared vision and goals for the future of Europe in space

TECH SPACE
Vector and ATLAS partner to introduce new satellite ground architecture offering

3-D-printed permanent magnets outperform conventional versions, conserve rare materials

Nickel-78 is a doubly magic isotope supercomputer confirms

Researchers bring eyewear-free 3-D capabilities to small screen

TECH SPACE
What happens to a pathogenic fungus grown in space?

How Planets Like Jupiter Form

Giant Rings Around Exoplanet Turn in the Wrong Direction

Preferentially Earth-sized Planets with Lots of Water

TECH SPACE
Mystery solved behind birth of Saturn's rings

Last Bits of 2015 Pluto Flyby Data Received on Earth

Uranus may have two undiscovered moons

Possible Clouds on Pluto, Next Target is Reddish




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement