Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Pushy neighbors force stellar twins to diverge
by Blaine Friedlander for Cornell Chronicle
Ithaca NY (SPX) Apr 16, 2014


Cosmic twins the LBV3 nebula (top row) and the Pistol Nebula (bottom row) display how even large objects in the universe can be affected neighborly influences. The left images were taken with FORCAST, the Faint Object InfraRed Camera for NASA's airborne SOFIA Telescope. The right images of each nebula were taken by a near-infrared spectrometer on the Hubble Space Telescope.

Much like an environment influences people, so too do cosmic communities affect even giant dazzling stars: Peering deep into the Milky Way galaxy's center from a high-flying observatory, Cornell astronomers have discovered identical, rare stars whose diverging dusty and gaseous garb are strictly influenced by an intrusive cluster of neighbors.

Scarce, short-lived, hyperbright stars called luminous blue variables - a million times brighter than our own sun - inhabit the center of the Milky Way galaxy, 25,000 light years from Earth, which loiters in the Milky Way boonies. Astronomers have found two luminous blue variable (LBV) stars - one called the Pistol star and the other named LBV3 - to be identical. As stars, they are themselves neighbors, but their dusty, gaseous outer cloaks (outer nebulae) are substantially different.

Both are the same size and have identical gas-to-dust mass ratios and total gas masses, according to a paper published April 2 in the Astrophysical Journal.

"Think identical stars with different shells. We found that the nebula of the insanely bright Pistol star is warped, while the LBV3 is an almost-perfect spherical shell," says Ryan M. Lau, Cornell doctoral candidate in the field of astronomy. "These LBVs are rare stars, and we only know about 12 that exist, but they are surrounded by these dust- and gas-filled nebulae that look different."

Both the Pistol star and LBV3 formed under similar conditions, according to the researchers. Dust in the Pistol star's nebula is brilliant, compressed, externally heated and ionized, thanks to its proximity to neighbors in the Quintuplet Cluster.

By contrast, the LBV3 nebula is dim, symmetrical and cooler. LBV3's nebula progresses in an outward fashion naturally, thanks to its relative lack of proximity to anything.

"The initial attention draw to the Pistol star was its high luminosity, [but] the nebulae around it and its sister star [LBV3] have turned out to be quite interesting. While the Pistol star is a member of the Quintuplet Cluster - although on the outskirts of the cluster - it is about six light-years away from the cluster's center. That's about 1.5 times the distance from our solar system to the nearest star," says senior author Terry Herter, Cornell professor of astronomy and department chair.

"It's impressive that even at this distance, the rest of the Quintuplet Cluster exerts a large influence on the Pistol nebula."

In optical ground telescopes, cosmic dust obfuscates both stars. To cut through the cosmic grime, astronomers need a midrange infrared telescope.

To explore far above atmospheric waters, the astronomers examined the inner galaxy July 1, 2013, from SOFIA (the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy), a modified Boeing 747 SP that climbs to 43,000 feet. To spy these super luminous objects, the group used FORCAST, the Faint Object InfraRed Camera for the SOFIA Telescope, developed at Cornell.

The research, "Nature Versus Nurture: Luminous Blue Variable Nebulae in and Near Massive Stellar Clusters at the Galactic Center," was also co-authored by Mark Morris, University of California, Los Angeles, and Joe Adams, SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center.

NASA and the Universities Space Research Association funded the research. Lau was previously an intern at Cornell, through the National Science Foundation-funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates program, while an undergraduate at Reed College.

.


Related Links
Cornell
Stellar Chemistry, The Universe And All Within It






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Cosmic Slurp
Austin TX (SPX) Apr 15, 2014
Somewhere in the cosmos an ordinary galaxy spins, seemingly at slumber. Then all of a sudden, WHAM! A flash of light explodes from the galaxy's center. A star orbiting too close to the event horizon of the galaxy's central supermassive black hole is torn apart by the force of gravity, heating up its gas and sending out a beacon to the far reaches of the universe. In a universe with tens of ... read more


STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Russia plans to get a foothold in the Moon

Russian Federal Space Agency is elaborating Moon exploration program

Science, Discovery Channels to broadcast private race to the moon

Take the Plunge: LADEE Impact Challenge

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Mars' halcyon times may have been fleeting

Meteorite studies suggest hidden water on Mars

Getting in Place for a Better View of Endeavour Crater

Gusev Crater once held a lake after all

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Minorities on display in Chinese tourist boom

Veggie Will Expand Fresh Food Production on ISS

Reporters See NASA's Latest High Tech Exploration Tool Before Testing

Recycling astronaut urine for energy and drinking water

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
China launches experimental satellite

Tiangong's New Mission

"Space Odyssey": China's aspiration in future space exploration

China to launch first "space shuttle bus" this year

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Dragon Cargo Craft Launch Scrubbed; Station Crew Preps for Spacewalk

Backup ISS computer breaks down, requiring possible spacewalk

No politics in space: ISS example of what Russia, US can achieve working together

Sakura tree grown in space blooms in Japan

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Russia will continue rocket engines supplies to US

MEASAT-3b shipped to launch base

Egypt to launch new satellite from Kazakhstan

NASA Ames Launches Nanosatellites, Science Experiments on SpaceX Rocket

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Chance meeting creates celestial diamond ring

Faraway Moon or Faint Star? Possible Exomoon Found

The Importance of Planetary Plumes

Orbital physics is child's play with 'Super Planet Crash'

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Amazonas 4A satellite anomaly being investigated following launch

Vanguard Space Technologies Antenna Reflectors on Amazonas Satellite Launch

Middle Eastern country orders more border radar

Headwall Extends Global Reach in Asia/Pac and Israel




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.