Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




OZONE NEWS
Plugging an ozone hole
by Staff Writers
Boston MA (SPX) Apr 17, 2014


File image.

Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, scientists, policymakers, and the public have wondered whether we might someday see a similarly extreme depletion of ozone over the Arctic.

But a new MIT study finds some cause for optimism: Ozone levels in the Arctic haven't yet sunk to the extreme lows seen in Antarctica, in part because international efforts to limit ozone-depleting chemicals have been successful.

"While there is certainly some depletion of Arctic ozone, the extremes of Antarctica so far are very different from what we find in the Arctic, even in the coldest years," says Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at MIT, and lead author of a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Frigid temperatures can spur ozone loss because they create prime conditions for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. When sunlight hits these clouds, it sparks a reaction between chlorine from chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), human-made chemicals once used for refrigerants, foam blowing, and other applications - ultimately destroying ozone.

A success story of science and policy
After the ozone-attacking properties of CFCs were discovered in the 1980s, countries across the world agreed to phase out their use as part of the 1987 Montreal Protocol treaty. While CFCs are no longer in use, those emitted years ago remain in the atmosphere.

As a result, atmospheric concentrations have peaked and are now slowly declining, but it will be several decades before CFCs are totally eliminated from the environment - meaning there is still some risk of ozone depletion caused by CFCs.

"It's really a success story of science and policy, where the right things were done just in time to avoid broader environmental damage," says Solomon, who made some of the first measurements in Antarctica that pointed toward CFCs as the primary cause of the ozone hole.

To obtain their findings, the researchers used balloon and satellite data from the heart of the ozone layer over both polar regions. They found that Arctic ozone levels did drop significantly during an extended period of unusual cold in the spring of 2011.

While this dip did depress ozone levels, the decrease was nowhere near as drastic as the nearly complete loss of ozone in the heart of the layer seen in many years in Antarctica.

The MIT team's work also helps to show chemical reasons for the differences, demonstrating that ozone loss in Antarctica is closely associated with reduced levels of nitric acid in air that is colder than that in the Arctic.

"We'll continue to have cold years with extreme Antarctic ozone holes for a long time to come," Solomon says. "We can't be sure that there will never be extreme Arctic ozone losses in an unusually cold future year, but so far, so good - and that's good news."

.


Related Links
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
All about the Ozone Layer






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





OZONE NEWS
NASA Simulation Portrays Ozone Intrusions From Aloft
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Apr 13, 2014
Outdoor enthusiasts in Colorado's Front Range are occasionally rewarded with remarkable visibility brought about by dry, clear air and wind. But it's what people in the mountainous U.S. West can't see in conditions like this - ozone plunging down to the ground from high in the stratosphere, the second layer of the atmosphere - that has attracted the interest of NASA scientists, university scient ... read more


OZONE NEWS
Russian Federal Space Agency is elaborating Moon exploration program

Science, Discovery Channels to broadcast private race to the moon

Take the Plunge: LADEE Impact Challenge

Land a Lunar Laser Reflector Now!

OZONE NEWS
Gusev Crater once held a lake after all

Mars Exploration in a Deep Mine

Images From NASA Mars Rover Include Bright Spots

NASA's rover Curiosity discovers Australia on Mars, sort of

OZONE NEWS
Minorities on display in Chinese tourist boom

Veggie Will Expand Fresh Food Production on ISS

Reporters See NASA's Latest High Tech Exploration Tool Before Testing

Recycling astronaut urine for energy and drinking water

OZONE NEWS
China launches experimental satellite

Tiangong's New Mission

"Space Odyssey": China's aspiration in future space exploration

China to launch first "space shuttle bus" this year

OZONE NEWS
'Cherry tree from space' mystery baffles Japan

Extra-terrestrial Tweet-up links Tokyo with space

Russian cargo ship docks to space station

Progress Departs, New Cargo Ships Awaiting Launch

OZONE NEWS
NASA Ames Launches Nanosatellites, Science Experiments on SpaceX Rocket

On-board camera provides a unique perspective on Arianespace Flight VS07

The DZZ-HR satellite is fueled for Arianespace's upcoming Vega launch

EUTELSAT 3B Mission Status Update

OZONE NEWS
Chance meeting creates celestial diamond ring

Faraway Moon or Faint Star? Possible Exomoon Found

The Importance of Planetary Plumes

Orbital physics is child's play with 'Super Planet Crash'

OZONE NEWS
Vanguard Space Technologies Antenna Reflectors on Amazonas Satellite Launch

Middle Eastern country orders more border radar

Headwall Extends Global Reach in Asia/Pac and Israel

A new twist for better steel




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.