Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















One-Of-A-Kind Meteorite Unveiled

On January 25 near dusk, a local resident, Jim Brook (below), found meteorites on the snow covered ice of Taku Arm of Tagish Lake while driving home. He returned the next day to collect several dozen meteorites in total. The meteorites represent a particularly fragile variety of carbonaceous chondrites (1, 2). The meteorites were collected without skin contact and have been kept subsequently frozen. During the spring melt, ~500 additional meteorites were recovered from a strew field ~16 km long and ~5 km wide oriented at ~150.
by Staff Writers
Edmonton, Canada (SPX) Apr 24, 2006
The depths of space are much closer to home following the University of Alberta's acquisition of a meteorite that is the only one of its kind known to exist on Earth! What makes it so rare? The meteorite is 'pristine' - that is, still frozen and uncontaminated - and so provides an invaluable preserved record of material from when the solar system formed 4.57 billion years ago.

The Tagish Lake Meteorite is carbonaceous chondrite and, as such, represents primitive material from which the solar system formed. The meteorite is rich in pre-solar grains - grains from other stars that were present near our solar system when it formed.

The meteorite contains primitive molecules that are the building blocks of the components necessary for life. The pristine state of the meteorite makes it especially important for scientific research purposes; it presents an unprecedented opportunity to look for extraterrestrial ices.

The University of Alberta, through the Department of Museums and Collections Services and the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, led a consortium of partners that, together, acquired the pristine samples for mutual research and heritage interests.

These partners include the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Royal Ontario Museum, Natural Resources Canada, and the Canadian Space Agency.

Dr. Christopher Herd, the Curator of the University of Alberta Meteorite Collection, will lead future research on the University's approximately 650 grams of this unique extraterrestrial rock.

"What's fascinating about the Tagish Lake Meteorite is that it enables us to probe the farthest reaches of our solar system by studying material that has come to us,' noted Dr. Herd, a professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alberta.

The study of the meteorite has the potential for revolutionizing our understanding of the formation of the solar system. The meteorite fell on the frozen surface of Tagish Lake, northern BC, in Canada on January 18, 2000.

Related Links
University of Alberta



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Deflecting Asteroids Difficult But Possible
Moscow, Russia (RIA) Apr 23, 2006
Col. Gen. Vladimir Popovkin, commander of the Russian Military Space Forces, told a news conference Friday that the national satellite network lacked a spacecraft capable of preventing an asteroid strike.







  • SPACEHAB Seeking New Government Business
  • Lula Decorates First Astronaut Of Brazil
  • Malaysia Conference Considers How To Practice Islam In Space
  • Aeroflex Expands Their Radhard MSI Logic Multipurpose Transceiver Family

  • Spirit Studies New Terrain At Its Winter Haven
  • Life-Marker Chip Planned For ESA Mars Lander
  • Opportunity Heads Toward Victoria
  • New Mineral History Shows That Young Mars May Have Supported Life

  • Cloud Mission Double Satellite Launch Scrubbed Again Until Tuesday
  • Atlas 5 Launches ASTRA 1KR Satellite
  • Cadet-Designed Rocket Blasts Off From California
  • Ariane 5 Receives Instrument Package

  • SAIC Acquires Geo-Spatial Technologies
  • GeoEye To Keep An Eye On Farming Crop Subsidies For Europe
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Gauge Indian Ocean Pollutants
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Gauge Indian Ocean Pollutants

  • Xena Poses A Bright Mystery
  • Tenth Planet Only Slightly Bigger Than Pluto
  • New Horizons Payload Gets High Marks on Early Tests
  • "Zero G and I Feel Fine"

  • Observations Reveal Origin Of Dust Around Nearby Star
  • More Research Links Dark Matter To Galaxy Formation
  • Infrared Space Observatory Provides First View Of Monster Stars Being Born
  • Killer GRB Unlikely In The Galactic Neighborhood

  • China Completes Radio Telescope For Moon-Probe Project
  • Pete Worden Is New NASA Ames Director
  • Lunar Rocks Suggest Meteorite Shower
  • NASA Seeking Lunar Exploration Ideas

  • Spirent To Supply Testing Equipment For Galileo
  • New Student-Designed System Tracks Firefighter And Special Forces
  • Russia And India Discuss Military Element For GLONASS
  • Germany's Gateway To The World

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement