Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .

New safety system for unmanned aerial systems in U.S.
by Richard Tomkins
Herndon, Va. (UPI) Apr 23, 2015

disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only

An air surveillance and sense-and-avoid system for unmanned aerial systems operating in the United States has been launched been launched by Exelis.

Exelis says its Symphony RangeVue tool gives UAS operators real-time Federal Aviation Administration surveillance data, flexible background maps and weather information for enhanced safety.

The surveillance information is accessed through a Web-hosted platform and geo-fencing tools alert operators when a UAS approaches airspace boundaries or when other aircraft are in the vicinity.

The system combines a high-performance visualization engine with the network of Exelis NextGen surveillance data, including FAA's surveillance systems; automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast; en-route radar; terminal radar; airport surface detection equipment-X; and airport surface surveillance capability, the company said.

"For the first time, UAS operators and test range personnel will have the same situational awareness currently available to general aviation pilots through traffic information broadcast services," said Ed Sayadian, vice president of Civil and Aerospace Solutions for Exelis. "This capability is available without having to install avionics surveillance equipment on the UAS aircraft.

"Leveraging the FAA's own surveillance data combined with advanced sense-and-avoid alerting capabilities, Symphony RangeVue will significantly increase the safety of UAS operations."


Related Links
UAV News - Suppliers and Technology

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Navy's Triton drone flies with new radar system
Patuxent River, Md. (UPI) Apr 21, 2015
A U.S. Navy MQ-4C Triton unmanned aerial system has flown for the first time with a new search radar system that provides enhanced surveillance capabilities. The new radar is named the Multi-Function Active Sensor, with a 360-degree view of a large geographic area and providing all-weather coverage for detecting, classifying, tracking and identifying points of interest, Naval Air System ... read more

Japan to land first unmanned spacecraft on moon in 2018

Russia Planning Manned Flight Around Moon in 2025

Dating the moon-forming impact event with meteorites

Japan to land probe on the moon in 2018

UAE opens space center to oversee mission to Mars

Robotic Arm Gets Busy on Rock Outcrop

Mars might have liquid water

NASA's Curiosity Rover Making Tracks and Observations

Space law is no longer beyond this world

Ramping Up For Johnson's Chamber A Test

Space icon reflects on origins of space program

Russia vows to put Russian cosmonauts on Moon no later than 2030

Xinhua Insight: How China joins space club?

Chinese scientists mull power station in space

China completes second test on new carrier rocket's power system

China's Yutu rover reveals Moon's "complex" geological history

Political Tensions Between Russia, US Irrelevant Aboard ISS

Liquid crystal bubbles experiment arrives at International Space Station

Russia, US to go ahead with International Space Station

Sixth SpaceX Delivery of Station Research With a Side of Caffeine

Ariane 5 reaches the launch zone for next heavy-lift mission

Sentinel-2A arrives for Ariane Vega mission

Arianespace Flight VA222: THOR 7 and SICRAL 2 - launch delayed

SpaceX: We Know Why Our Rocket Crashed

First exoplanet visible light spectrum

Can we find an ancient Earth-like planet with a dying biosphere?

White Dwarf May Have Shredded Passing Planet

Spitzer, OGLE spot planet deep within our galaxy

Russian Mission Control Adjusts ISS Orbit to Avoid Space Junk

New 'space trash' laser may tidy up Earth's orbit

Technique could slash energy used to produce many plastics

A blueprint for clearing the skies of space debris

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.