Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




WATER WORLD
New challenges for ocean acidification research
by Staff Writers
Kiel, Germany (SPX) Jan 02, 2015


File image.

To continue its striking development, ocean acidification research needs to bridge between its diverging branches towards an integrated assessment. This is the conclusion drawn by Prof. Ulf Riebesell from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Dr. Jean-Pierre Gattuso from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie.

In a commentary in the journal "Nature Climate Change", the two internationally renowned experts reflect on the lessons learned from ocean acidification research and highlight future challenges.

Over the past decade, ocean acidification has received growing recognition not only in the scientific area. Decision-makers, stakeholders, and the general public are becoming increasingly aware of "the other carbon dioxide problem". It is time to reflect on the successes and deficiencies of ocean acidification research and to take a look forward at the challenges the fastest growing field of marine science is facing.

In the January issue of the journal "Nature Climate Change" Ulf Riebesell, professor for Biological Oceanography at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, and Jean-Pierre Gattuso from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) urge the international scientific community to undertake a concerted interdisciplinary effort.

According to the two experts, future ocean acidification research will have to deal with three major challenges: It needs to expand from single to multiple drivers, from single species to communities and ecosystems, and from evaluating acclimation to understanding adaptation. "The growing knowledge in each of the diverging research branches needs to be assimilated into an integrated assessment", Prof. Riebesell points out.

For the scientific community, it is obvious that ocean acidification does not occur in isolation. Rising temperatures, loss of oxygen, eutrophication, pollution and other drivers happen simultaneously and interact to influence the development of marine organisms and communities.

"The effects can be additive, synergistic or antagonistic and it is generally not possible to extrapolate from single- to multiple-driver responses", Prof. Riebesell explains. "But with an increasing number of parameters, experiments become increasingly challenging in terms of time, space and costs. Also, it becomes ever more difficult to compare and verify results of similar studies."

There is now an impressive body of scientific literature on how individual species react to ocean acidification as a single driver. Many calcifying organisms such as corals, mussels or snails will find it more and more difficult to build their shells and skeletons. The extra energy needed for calcification will be lacking for other biological processes, such as growth or reproduction. "But an open question is to what extent results from short-term, single-driver laboratory experiments can be extrapolated to the real world", Dr. Gattuso states.

As shown in laboratory experiments, evolutionary adaptation to ocean acidification is possible. The larger the population size of a species and the shorter its generation time is, the higher the chances are that it can adapt to new environmental conditions through selection or mutation. "But can adaptation keep up with the fast changes we are experiencing today? Are the organisms able to maintain their functions within the changing ecosystem," Dr. Gattuso wonders.

To make further significant progress in the future, ocean acidification research has to integrate the knowledge gained in its three diverging branches - addressing multiple stress factors, competitive and trophic interactions, and adaptation through evolution.

"This requires an interdisciplinary effort, for example through long-term experiments that examine the effects of multiple drivers over many generations at the community level. "Experiments have to be tightly integrated with field studies and model simulations", Prof. Riebesell recommends.

"A key factor in this process will be that funding opportunities are opened up for large-scale integrative projects, long-term monitoring and international collaborations." Now that a basic understanding of ocean acidification impacts is developing, it is critical to pay special attention to aspects relevant for society. "This will then pave the way to develop management options and provide science-based policy advice."

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Australia's coastal network keeps watch on extreme ocean events
Canberra, Australia (SPX) Dec 26, 2014
A network of nine reference sites off the Australian coast is providing the latest physical, chemical, and biological information to help scientists better understand Australia's coastal seas, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tim Lynch from CSIRO, Australia and colleagues. Sustained oceanic observations allow scientists to track changes in oceanography ... read more


WATER WORLD
'Shooting the Moon' with Satellite Laser Ranging

Moon Express testing compact lunar lander at Kennedy

UK Plans to Drill Into Moon, Explore Feasibility of Manned Base

Carnegie Mellon Unveils Lunar Rover "Andy"

WATER WORLD
Russian scientists 'map' water vapor in Martian atmosphere

Flying over Becquerel

New idea for transporting spacecraft could ease trip to Mars

NASA, Planetary Scientists Find Meteoritic Evidence of Mars Water Reservoir

WATER WORLD
FFD signs Space Act Agreement with NASA for Space Suit Development

NASA Commercial Crew Partners Complete 23 Milestones in 2014

NASA Selects Commercial Space Partners for Collaborative Partnerships

Does the peer review process stifle scientific innovation?

WATER WORLD
China's Long March puts satellite in orbit on 200th launch

Countdown to China's new space programs begins

China develops new rocket for manned moon mission: media

Service module of China's returned lunar orbiter reaches L2 point

WATER WORLD
Bright lights: big cities at night

NASA, SpaceX Update Launch of Fifth SpaceX Resupply Mission to ISS

Fifth SpaceX Mission Lets the CATS Out on the International Space Station

Politics no problem, say US and Russian spacefarers

WATER WORLD
Soyuz Installed at Baikonur, Expected to Launch Wednesday

Russian Space Agency Pushes Back Earth Imaging Satellite Launch to Friday

Thirty-five years of Ariane: how Ariane was born

Strela Rocket With Kondor-E Satellite Blasts Off From Baikonur

WATER WORLD
Kepler Proves It Can Still Find Planets

NASA's Kepler Reborn, Makes First Exoplanet Find of New Mission

Super-Earth spotted by ground-based telescope, a first

Astronomers spot Pluto-size objects swarming about young sun

WATER WORLD
Lead islands in a sea of graphene magnetize the material of the future

Penn Researchers Show Commonalities in How Different Glassy Materials Fail

Theory details how 'hot' monomers affect thin-film formation

Back to future with Roman architectural concrete




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.