Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















SPACE MEDICINE
NASA 1-year mission investigators identify links to vision problems
by Staff Writers
Houston TX (SPX) Jun 01, 2017


The preliminary findings are a bit of both. One subject developed SANS early in the mission and had some symptoms worsen as the mission lengthened while another did not. The subject who did not experience SANS symptoms during the first six months of flight did start to show some changes near the end of his year in space, suggesting that length of time in space may impact the eye.

Coinciding with May - Healthy Vision Month, NASA's One-Year Mission investigators are peering into their new findings to help address astronaut vision issues. While the One-Year Mission has concluded for retired astronaut Scott Kelly, NASA's Human Research Program is focusing on comparing previous six-month mission findings to One-Year Mission preliminary findings.

Nutritional Biochemistry Lab lead Scott M. Smith, Ph.D., takes a broad look at biochemistry. He studies the astronaut diets along with protein, vitamin, mineral, and other chemicals in blood and urine to look for indicators of disease or other physiological changes.

His team discovered that astronauts with vision issues had biochemical differences before ever leaving Earth as compared to astronauts without vision issues, and subsequently documented that this was evidence of a genetic predisposition for some astronauts to develop vision and eye issues. He thinks his team is on the path to help resolve vision issues for astronauts. This is an important finding as NASA prepares for a human journey to Mars.

Typically, physiologists and scientists study one system at a time, but nutrition is a cross-cutting science with impacts across systems biology. Smith emphasizes the importance of studying the human body holistically, which is why his team has led the effort to create a biochemical database making it more efficient to interface with other researchers, such as the 22 other One-Year Mission investigators.

Another investigator who works with Smith at NASA's Johnson Space Center is Michael Stenger, Ph.D. He is the Cardiovascular and Vision Lab lead and principal investigator for the Fluid Shifts investigation, which is an international experiment designed to determine the relationship between headward fluid shifts and ocular structural changes. Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome, or SANS, is hypothesized to be caused by blood flow toward the head due to lack of gravity, resulting in changes to eye structure and possibly vision changes.

This headward fluid shift may be responsible for vision changes, flattening of the eyeball and swelling of some tissues in the back of the eye and engorgement of the optic nerve sheath seen in approximately one out of three International Space Station astronauts.

The One-Year Mission was a great opportunity to see if vision changes occurring during six-month missions continued and worsened when the mission is extended to a year. Stenger could also see if astronauts who did not have vision issues at the six-month mark, developed them when extended to one year in space.

The preliminary findings are a bit of both. One subject developed SANS early in the mission and had some symptoms worsen as the mission lengthened while another did not. The subject who did not experience SANS symptoms during the first six months of flight did start to show some changes near the end of his year in space, suggesting that length of time in space may impact the eye.

Both Smith and Stenger are working together to solve eye and vision problems for astronauts. They agree their investigations are just scratching the surface and there is a lot of work that still needs to be done on the ground and in space to validate theories. While Scott Kelly returned to Earth in a healthy state, NASA continues to keep its vision focused on sending humans safely and effectively on a three-year journey to Mars.

Research paper

SPACE MEDICINE
CRISPR gene editing can cause hundreds of unintended mutations
New York NY (SPX) May 31, 2017
As CRISPR-Cas9 starts to move into clinical trials, a new study published in Nature Methods has found that the gene-editing technology can introduce hundreds of unintended mutations into the genome. "We feel it's critical that the scientific community consider the potential hazards of all off-target mutations caused by CRISPR, including single nucleotide mutations and mutations in non-codi ... read more

Related Links
Johnson Space Center
Space Medicine Technology and Systems

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

SPACE MEDICINE
Astronauts return after marathon ISS mission

From 2D to 3D, Space Station Microscope Gets an Upgrade

John Glenn Cygnus departs ISS begins secondary mission

Studying Flame Behavior in Microgravity with a Solid "High-Five"

SPACE MEDICINE
SpaceX's first recycled Dragon arrives at space station

SpaceX blasts off cargo using recycled spaceship

India shows off space prowess with launch of mega-rocket

Eutelsat signs new launch contract with Arianespace

SPACE MEDICINE
Study estimates amount of water needed to carve Martian valleys

Curiosity Peels Back Layers on Ancient Martian Lake

Collateral damage from cosmic rays increases cancer risks for Mars astronauts

Student-Made Mars Rover Concepts Lift Off

SPACE MEDICINE
Spotlight: First China-designed experiment flies to space station

News Analysis: U.S.-China space freeze may thaw with new commercial pathway

China willing to cooperate in peaceful space exploration: Xi

California Woman Charged for Trying to Hand Over Sensitive Space Tech to China

SPACE MEDICINE
Thomas Pesquet returns to Earth

Propose a course idea for the CU space minor

Leading Global Air And Space Law Group Joins Reed Smith

New Horizons for Alexander Gerst

SPACE MEDICINE
High pressure key to lighter, stronger metal alloys, Stanford scientists find

Mitsubishi Electric Completes New Satellite Component Production Facility

Space junk could destroy satellites, hurt economies

BAE Systems, Helios to collaborate on liquid armor

SPACE MEDICINE
Discovery reveals planet almost as hot as the Sun

Hubble's tale of 2 exoplanets - Nature vs nurture

Astronomers discover alien world hotter than most stars

Citizen scientists uncover a cold new world near sun

SPACE MEDICINE
A whole new Jupiter with first science results from Juno

First results from Juno show cyclones and massive magnetism

Jupiters complex transient auroras

NASA's Juno probe forces 'rethink' on Jupiter




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement