Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















IRON AND ICE
NASA'S First Asteroid Deflection Mission Enters Next Design Phase
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jul 07, 2017


Artist concept of NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft. DART, which is moving to preliminary design phase, would be NASA's first mission to demonstrate an asteroid deflection technique for planetary defense. Credits: NASA/JHUAPL

The first-ever mission to demonstrate an asteroid deflection technique for planetary defense - the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) - is moving from concept development to preliminary design phase, following NASA's approval on June 23.

"DART would be NASA's first mission to demonstrate what's known as the kinetic impactor technique - striking the asteroid to shift its orbit - to defend against a potential future asteroid impact," said Lindley Johnson, planetary defense officer at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "This approval step advances the project toward an historic test with a non-threatening small asteroid."

While current law directs the development of the DART mission, DART is not identified as a specific budget item in the Administration's Fiscal Year 2018 budget.

The target for DART is an asteroid that will have a distant approach to Earth in October 2022, and then again in 2024. The asteroid is called Didymos - Greek for "twin" - because it's an asteroid binary system that consists of two bodies: Didymos A, about one-half mile (780 meters) in size, and a smaller asteroid orbiting it called Didymos B, about 530 feet (160 meters) in size. DART would impact only the smaller of the two bodies, Didymos B.

The Didymos system has been closely studied since 2003. The primary body is a rocky S-type object, with composition similar to that of many asteroids. The composition of its small companion, Didymos B, is unknown, but the size is typical of asteroids that could potentially create regional effects should they impact Earth.

"A binary asteroid is the perfect natural laboratory for this test," said Tom Statler, program scientist for DART at NASA Headquarters. "The fact that Didymos B is in orbit around Didymos A makes it easier to see the results of the impact, and ensures that the experiment doesn't change the orbit of the pair around the sun."

After launch, DART would fly to Didymos, and use an on-board autonomous targeting system to aim itself at Didymos B. Then the refrigerator-sized spacecraft would strike the smaller body at a speed about nine times faster than a bullet, approximately 3.7 miles per second (6 kilometers per second). Earth-based observatories would be able to see the impact and the resulting change in the orbit of Didymos B around Didymos A, allowing scientists to better determine the capabilities of kinetic impact as an asteroid mitigation strategy.

The kinetic impact technique works by changing the speed of a threatening asteroid by a small fraction of its total velocity, but by doing it well before the predicted impact so that this small nudge will add up over time to a big shift of the asteroid's path away from Earth.

"DART is a critical step in demonstrating we can protect our planet from a future asteroid impact," said Andy Cheng of The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, the DART investigation co-lead.

"Since we don't know that much about their internal structure or composition, we need to perform this experiment on a real asteroid. With DART, we can show how to protect Earth from an asteroid strike with a kinetic impactor by knocking the hazardous object into a different flight path that would not threaten the planet."

Small asteroids hit Earth almost daily, breaking up harmlessly in the upper atmosphere. Objects large enough to do damage at the surface are much rarer. Objects larger than 0.6 miles (1 kilometer) in diameter - large enough to cause global effects - have been the focus of NASA's ground-based search for potentially hazardous objects with orbits that bring them near the Earth, and about 93 percent of these sized objects have already been found.

DART would test technologies to deflect objects in the intermediate size range-large enough to do regional damage, yet small enough that there are many more that have not been observed and could someday hit Earth. NASA-funded telescopes and other assets continue to search for these objects, track their orbits, and determine if they are a threat.

To assess and formulate capabilities to address these potential threats, NASA established its Planetary Defense Coordination Office (PDCO) in 2016, which is responsible for finding, tracking and characterizing potentially hazardous asteroids and comets coming near Earth, issuing warnings about possible impacts, and assisting plans and coordination of U.S. government response to an actual impact threat.

DART is being designed and would be built and managed by The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland. The project would be overseen by the Planetary Missions Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. DART also is supported by teams from the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas; and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

Learn more about DART

IRON AND ICE
How a Speck of Light Becomes an Asteroid
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 03, 2017
On the first day of the year 1801, Italian astronomer Gioacchino Giuseppe Maria Ubaldo Nicolo Piazzi found a previously uncharted "tiny star" near the constellation of Taurus. The following night Piazzi again observed this newfound celestial object, discovering that the speck had changed its position relative to the nearby stars. Piazzi knew that real stars were so far away that they never ... read more

Related Links
Planetary Defense at NASA
Asteroid and Comet Mission News, Science and Technology

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

IRON AND ICE
NASA Statement on National Space Council

Don't look down: glass bottom skywalk thrills in China

Silicon-on-Seine: world's biggest tech incubator opens in Paris

India, Portugal Shake Hands on Space Cooperation

IRON AND ICE
After two delays, SpaceX launches broadband satellite for IntelSat

Aerojet Rocketdyne advocates solar electric propulsion as central element of deep space exploration

Ariane 5 launch proves reliability and flies new fairing

80th consecutive success for Ariane 5 with launch of Hellas Sat, Inmarsat and ISRO

IRON AND ICE
Mars Rover Opportunity continuing science campaign at Perseverance Valley

The Niagara Falls of Mars once flowed with lava

Russian Devices for ExoMars Mission to Be Ready in Fall 2017

No One Under 20 Has Experienced a Day Without NASA at Mars

IRON AND ICE
China heavy-lift carrier rocket launch fails: state media

Yuanwang-3 completes ship check mission, ready for Chang'e-5 lunar probe launch

China prepares to launch second heavy-lift carrier rocket

China to launch Long March-5 Y2 in early July

IRON AND ICE
SES Transfers Capacity from AMC-9 Satellite Following Significant Anomaly

HTS Capacity Lease Revenues to Reach More Than $6 Billion by 2025

Second launch doubles number of Iridium NEXT satellites in orbit to 20

OneWeb inaugurates production line Assembly, Integration, and Test of OneWeb satellites

IRON AND ICE
NIST 'noise thermometry' yields accurate new measurements of boltzmann constant

SES and MDA Announce First Satellite Life Extension Agreement

Space Debris Mitigation Mission Successfully Launched on June 23rd, 2017

True romance in the air at Tokyo virtual reality show

IRON AND ICE
Extreme Atmosphere Stripping May Limit Exoplanets' Habitability

Complex Organic Molecules Found On "Space Hamburger"

Why Does Microorganism Prefer Meager Rations Over Rich Ones

NASA diligently tracks microbes inside the International Space Station

IRON AND ICE
Mid-infrared images from the Subaru telescope extend Juno spacecraft discoveries

Earth-based Views of Jupiter to Enhance Juno Flyby

NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10

Topsy-Turvy Motion Creates Light-Switch Effect at Uranus




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement