Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
Making telescopes that curve and twist
by Staff Writers
Los Angeles CA (SPX) Jul 24, 2017


New computational tool automates design of telescoping structures that provide compact storage and rapid deployment. Shown here: a complex telescoping lizard expands to many times its original volume, serving as a stress test of the method. Credit (Chris Yu/Carnegie Mellon University)

A new tool for computational design allows users to turn any 3D shape into a collapsible telescoping structure. New mathematical methods developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University capture the complex and diverse properties of such structures, which are valuable for a variety of applications in 3D fabrication and robotics--particularly where mechanisms must be compact in size and easily deployable.

The research, "Computational Design of Telescoping Structures," led by Carnegie Mellon Professors Stelian Coros and Keenan Crane and PhD student Christopher Yu, will be presented at the annual SIGGRAPH conference, 30 July to 3 August in Los Angeles. The conference each year spotlights the most innovative in computer graphics research and interactive techniques worldwide.

Traditional telescopes are perfectly straight, and their ability to expand from a compact form into a much bigger structure has been widely exploited in engineering design. So far, however, there hasn't been a systematic study of the types of shapes that can be modeled by telescoping structures, nor practical tools for telescopic design.

At a recent maker faire, the researchers came across a set of retractable toy claws, fashioned after the popular X-Men character, Wolverine. Inspired by the claws' curved shape, they began to explore the idea of automating the design of telescoping structures, exploring a wide variety of shapes that could come out of a basic telescope model.

Far beyond the example of a typical straight telescope used for star gazing, other collapsible, deployable structures can benefit from a curved or twisted telescoping design: camping equipment such as tents or large outdoor structures used for music festivals; a heart stent that is tiny at the point of insertion but expands once it is surgically placed; or a robotic arm that can retract itself into a cylinder shape the size of a Coke can, enabling user portability and versatility.

"Among deployable mechanisms, telescopes are very interesting. Once you expand them, they are very flexible and you can make a lot of different shapes, all with the same telescope," notes Crane, coauthor and Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon. "We wanted to know what are all the possible shapes you can make from a telescoping structure."

The team's mathematical model of telescoping structures starts with three common-sense requirements: each shell must be manufacturable from rigid material (like metal), the telescope must be able to extend and contract without bumping into itself, and there should be no empty wasted space between nested pieces.

These basic requirements led to a key geometric insight: the complicated mechanical description of a telescope can be replaced by simple geometric curves that exhibit a constant amount of bend but arbitrary "twist," significantly generalizing the straight telescopes found in typical engineering designs. The team successfully prototyped applications in 3D fabrication and robotics, using their novel system to design both a flexible, controllable robot arm, and a tent-like structure that grows to several times its original volume.

TECH SPACE
A plastic planet
Santa Barbara CW (SPX) Jul 21, 2017
More than 8 billion metric tons. That's the amount of plastic humans have created since the large-scale production of synthetic materials began in the early 1950s. It's enough to cover the entire country of Argentina, and most of the material now resides in landfills or in the natural environment. Such are the findings of a new study led by UC Santa Barbara industrial ecologist Roland Geye ... read more

Related Links
Association for Computing Machinery
Space Technology News - Applications and Research


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

TECH SPACE
ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli starts third mission on Space Station

Voyager spacecraft still in communication 40 years out into the void

NextSTEP Partners Develop Ground Prototypes to Expand our Knowledge of Deep Space Habitats

A look inside the Space Station's experimental BEAM module

TECH SPACE
Iran in 'successful' test of satellite-launch rocket

NASA taps BWXT for reactor design for future Mars missions

Dragon to be packed with new experiments for International Space Station

ISRO Develops Ship-Based Antenna System to Track Satellite Launches

TECH SPACE
Eclipse Balloons to Study Effect of Mars-Like Environment on Life

Opportunity enters Automode during solar conjunction pause

Five Years Ago and 154 Million Miles Away: Touchdown!

For Moratorium on Sending Commands to Mars, Blame the Sun

TECH SPACE
China develops sea launches to boost space commerce

Chinese satellite Zhongxing-9A enters preset orbit

Chinese Space Program: From Setback, to Manned Flights, to the Moon

Chinese Rocket Fizzles Out, Puts Other Launches on Hold

TECH SPACE
Iridium Announces Third Iridium NEXT Launch Date

UK space companies to develop international partnerships

ASTROSCALE Raises a Total of $25 Million in Series C Led by Private Companies

LISA Pathfinder: bake, rattle and roll

TECH SPACE
Engineering on a blue streak

Spacepath Communications and Datum Systems announce strategic partnership

JV with Russia to build up to 50 satellite solid-state power amplifiers

NASA enhances online scientific tool used by hundreds Worldwide

TECH SPACE
Unexpected life found at bottom of High Arctic lakes

NASA hiring a planetary protection officer to guard against alien invaders

Researchers detect exoplanet with glowing water atmosphere

Hubble detects exoplanet with glowing water atmosphere

TECH SPACE
Twilight observations reveal huge storm on Neptune

Jovian storm looms large in the Jupiter's High North

New Horizons Video Soars over Pluto's Majestic Mountains and Icy Plains

Juno spots Jupiter's Great Red Spot




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement