Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















CHIP TECH
Mail armor inspires physicists
by Staff Writers
Karlsruher, Germany (SPX) Feb 10, 2017


The ring structure of the metamaterial was inspired by mail armor of medieval knights. Image courtesy KIT.

The Middle Ages certainly were far from being science-friendly: Whoever looked for new findings off the beaten track faced the threat of being burned at the stake. Hence, the contribution of this era to technical progress is deemed to be rather small. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), however, were inspired by medieval mail armor when producing a new metamaterial with novel properties. They succeeded in reversing the Hall coefficient of a material.

The Hall effect is the occurrence of a transverse electric voltage across an electric conductor passed by current flow, if this conductor is located in a magnetic field. This effect is a basic phenomenon of physics and allows to measure the strength of magnetic fields. It is the basis of magnetic speed sensors in cars or compasses in smartphones.

Apart from measuring magnetic fields, the Hall effect can also be used to characterize metals and semiconductors and in particular to determine charge carrier density of the material. The sign of the measured Hall voltage allows conclusions to be drawn as to whether charge carriers in the semiconductor element carry positive or negative charge.

Mathematicians already predicted theoretically that it is possible to reverse the Hall coefficient of a material (such as gold or silicon), i.e. to reverse its sign. This was expected to be achieved by a three-dimensional ring structure resembling medieval mail armor. How-ever, this was considered difficult, as the ring mesh of millionths of a meter in size would have to be composed of three different components.

Christian Kern, Muamer Kadic, and Martin Wegener of KIT's Institute of Applied Physics now found that a single basic material is sufficient, provided that the ring structure chosen follows a certain geometric arrangement. First, they produced polymer scaffolds with a highest-resolution 3D printer. Then, they coated these scaffolds with semiconducting zinc oxide.

The result of the experiment: The scientists can produce meta-materials with a positive coefficient, even though their components have negative coefficients. This sounds a bit like the philosopher's stone, the formula, by means of which medieval alchemists tried to convert one substance into another. But here, no conversion takes place. "The charge carriers in the metamaterial remain negatively charged electrons," Christian Kern explains. "Hall measurements only make them appear positively charged, as the structure forces them to take detours."

Kern admits that this discovery so far is of no practical use. There are sufficient solids with both negative and positive Hall coefficients. But Kern wants to continue research. The next step will be the production of anisotropic structures with a Hall voltage in the direction of the magnetic field. Normally, Hall voltage is directed vertically to current and magnetic fields. Such unconventional materials might be applied in novel sensors for the direct measurement of magnetic field eddies.


Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue source from good quality advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames, passwords and payment processes.

Our news coverage takes time and money to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites helpful then please consider becoming a regular supporter of just make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only


.


Related Links
Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
CHIP TECH
UNIST engineers oxide semiconductor just single atom thick
Ulsan, South Korea (SPX) Feb 10, 2017
A new study, affiliated with UNIST has introduced a novel method for fabrication of world's thinnest oxide semiconductor that is just one atom thick. This may open up new possibilities for thin, transparent, and flexible electronic devices, such as ultra-small sensors. This new ultra-thin oxide semiconductors was created by a team of scientists, led by Professor Zonghoon Lee of Materials S ... read more


CHIP TECH
NASA to develop oxygen recovery technologies for future deep space missions

Art and space enter a new dimension

Russia's first private space tourism craft flight test set for 2020

Next SpaceX mission will deliver slew of experiment payloads to ISS

CHIP TECH
Airbus Safran Launchers: 77th consecutive successful launch for Ariane 5

SpaceX poised to launch cargo from historic NASA pad

Airbus Safran Launchers: 77th consecutive successful launch for Ariane 5

India puts record 104 satellites into orbit

CHIP TECH
Opportunity passes 44 kilometers of surface travel after 13 years

Scientists shortlist three landing sites for Mars 2020

Scientists say Mars valley was flooded with water not long ago

ISRO saves its Mars mission spacecraft from eclipse

CHIP TECH
Chinese cargo spacecraft set for liftoff in April

China looks to Mars, Jupiter exploration

China's first cargo spacecraft to leave factory

China launches commercial rocket mission Kuaizhou-1A

CHIP TECH
Iridium Announces Target Date for Second Launch of Iridium NEXT

Italy, Russia working closely on Mars exploration, Earth monitoring satellites

NASA seeks partnerships with US companies to advance commercial space technologies

A New Space Paradigm

CHIP TECH
Most stretchable elastomer for 3-D printing

After 15 years, SABER on TIMED Still Breaks Ground from Space

ANU scientists make new high-tech liquid materials

Curtiss-Wright offers COTS Module for measuring microgravity acceleration

CHIP TECH
Exoplanetary moons formed by giant impacts could be detected by Kepler

The heart of a far-off star beats for its planet

Astronomy team finds more than 100 exoplanet candidates

Possibility of Silicon-Based Life Grows

CHIP TECH
NASA receives science report on Europa lander concept

New Horizons Refines Course for Next Flyby

It's Never 'Groundhog Day' at Jupiter

Public to Choose Jupiter Picture Sites for NASA Juno




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement