Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



AEROSPACE
Made-in-China passenger jet set to take wing
By Albee ZHANG
Shanghai (AFP) May 3, 2017


China is expected this week to conduct the maiden test flight of a home-grown passenger jet built to meet soaring domestic travel demand and challenge the dominance of Boeing and Airbus.

The C919, built by state-owned aerospace manufacturer Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC), was set to take wing over Shanghai on Friday, the company said on Wednesday, according to the official Xinhua news agency.

"If weather conditions are not suitable, the maiden flight will be rescheduled," COMAC said, adding that engineers had completed some 118 tests.

The narrow-body jet represents nearly a decade of effort in a state-mandated drive to reduce dependence on European consortium Airbus and US aerospace giant Boeing.

"The first flight itself is not a huge deal. (But) of course, it's going to be a hugely symbolic moment in the evolution of China's aviation industry," said Greg Waldron, Asia managing editor at industry publication Flightglobal.

The C919 is the country's first big passenger plane and the latest sign of growing Chinese ambition and technical skill, coming one week after China launched its first domestically made aircraft carrier and docked a cargo spacecraft with an orbiting space lab.

The C919 can seat 168 passengers and has a range of 5,555 kilometres (3,444 miles).

- Long way to go -

China is a huge battleground for Boeing and Airbus, with its travellers taking to the skies in ever-growing numbers.

The Chinese travel market is expected to surpass the United States by 2024, according to the International Air Transport Association.

Airbus has estimated Chinese airlines will need nearly 6,000 new planes over the next two decades, while Boeing foresees 6,800 aircraft. Both put the combined price tags for those planes at around $1 trillion.

But aviation analysts said Shanghai-based COMAC has a long journey ahead before it can challenge the lock on the market by Boeing and Airbus.

"This is an important milestone for China with this new aircraft. But for it to move to the next stage, which is to sell this product, is not going to be so easy," said Shukor Yusof, an analyst with Malaysia-based aviation consultancy Endau Analytics.

But COMAC may be able to rely on purchases by fast-growing Chinese airlines.

It had already received 570 orders by the end of last year, almost all from domestic airlines.

Waldron agreed it would take time but said that over the next century China would become a world aviation player.

"You are going to have three big companies. You will have Boeing, you will have Airbus, and you will have COMAC," he said.

China has dreamed of building its own civil aircraft since the 1970s, when it began work on the narrow-body Y-10, which was eventually deemed unviable and never entered service.

COMAC's first regional jet, the 90-seat ARJ 21, entered service in 2016, several years late.

- Long-haul ambition -

The ARJ 21 is currently restricted to flying domestic routes as it still lacks the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification that would allow it to fly US skies.

China also has been in talks with the FAA to obtain certification for the C919, without result.

The C919's first test flight had been due to take place in 2016 but was delayed.

Besides the C919, China is also working with Russia to develop a long-haul wide-bodied jet called the C929.

Although the C919 is made in China, foreign firms are playing key roles by supplying systems as well as the engines, which are made by CFM International, a joint venture between General Electric of the US and France's Safran.

During a visit to COMAC in 2014, President Xi Jinping expressed concern that not having a homegrown plane left China at the mercy of foreign industrial groups.

China last August launched a new multi-billion dollar jet-engine conglomerate with nearly 100,000 employees, with the hope of powering its own planes with self-made engines.

After the C919's first flight, it will need to pass tests to obtain Chinese airworthiness certification before it can be sold.

AEROSPACE
Department of Defense awards contract for 240 F-35 Lightning II planes
Washington (UPI) May 1, 2017
Lockheed Martin has received a $1.377 billion contract for low-rate initial production of 130 Lot 12 F-35 Lightning II fighter planes. The contract includes parts, maintenance, and other services for the program, the Department of Defense announced. In addition the Lot 12 F-35 production for the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corp and other non-Department of Defense and foreign customers, the ... read more

Related Links
Aerospace News at SpaceMart.com


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

AEROSPACE
NASA Receives Proposals for Future Solar System Mission

'Road to Nowhere': Retired Cosmonaut Reveals How It Feels to Walk in Space

Orion Motor Ready for Crewed Mission

Students Taste Sweet Smell of Success in Culinary Challenge

AEROSPACE
Reaction Engines begins construction of UK rocket engine test facility

GSLV Successfully Launches South Asia Satellite

ISRO Successfully Launches GSAT-9 'SAARC' South Asian Communication Satellite

Arianespace orbits telecom satellites for Brazil and South Korea

AEROSPACE
Japan aims to uncover how moons of Mars formed

NASA Rover Curiosity Samples Active Linear Dune on Mars

Seasonal Flows in Valles Marineris

Is Anything Tough Enough to Survive on Mars

AEROSPACE
China to conduct several manned space flights around 2020

Reach for the Stars: China Plans to Ramp Up Space Flight Activity

China's cargo spacecraft completes in-orbit refueling

China courts international coalition set up to promote space cooperation

AEROSPACE
Allied Minds' portfolio company BridgeSat raises $6 million in Series A financing

Blue Sky Network Targets Key Markets For Iridium SATCOM Solutions

How Outsourcing Your Satellite Related Services Saves You Time and Money

ViaSat-2 Satellite to Launch on June 1

AEROSPACE
Why space dust emits radio waves upon crashing into a spacecraft

NASA Seeks 'FabLab' Concepts for In-Space Manufacturing

NASA Awards $100,000 in First Printing Stage of 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge

Shape-changing fog screen invented

AEROSPACE
SOFIA Confirms Nearby Planetary System Is Similar to Our Own

Research Center A Hub For Origins of Life Studies

Nearby Star Confirmed as Good Model of Our Early Solar System

Next Breakthroughs in Exoplanet Discovery

AEROSPACE
Not So Great Anymore: Jupiter's Red Spot Shrinks to Smallest Size Ever

The PI's Perspective: No Sleeping Back on Earth!

ALMA investigates 'DeeDee,' a distant, dim member of our solar system

Nap Time for New Horizons




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement