Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




MICROSAT BLITZ
Iran launches first satellite since 2012
by Staff Writers
Tehran (AFP) Feb 2, 2015


Iran launched an observation satellite Monday -- its first since 2012 -- with President Hassan Rouhani declaring it safely entered orbit and that he had personally ordered the mission.

The Fajr (Dawn) satellite was successfully placed 450 kilometres (280 miles) above Earth, said Al-Alam television, an Arabic-language station owned by the Islamic republic.

It is the fourth such satellite launch by Iran, after three others between 2009 and 2012.

The satellite was locally made, said the official IRNA news agency, as was its launcher, according to Rouhani who noted Iran's aim is to have no reliance on foreign space technology.

"Our scientists have entered a new phase for conquering space. We will continue on this path," Rouhani said in a short statement on state television.

Al-Alam said the Fajr satellite, weighing 52 kilos (114 pounds), would be able to take accurate pictures from space. It took eight minutes to reach orbit and is now linked with its ground-based controllers, state media said.

The launch came as Iran started 10 days of celebrations for the 36th anniversary of the Islamic revolution, culminating on February 11, "Victory Day," when the US-backed shah's reign officially ended in 1979.

Defence Minister General Hossein Dehgan echoed Rouhani's comments, stating that the 21-metre and 26 tonne launcher, named Safir-Fajr, shows "the ability of Iran to build satellite launchers".

In February 2010, Iran launched a satellite containing a rat, turtles and insects.

Separate missions under Iran's space programme have seen two capsules launched. One, in January 2013, included a monkey that was recovered alive.

Iran's space activities, however, have sent alarm bells ringing in the international community amid concern over Tehran's development of technology that could have military purposes.

Some Western countries suspect Iran of secretly trying to build an atomic bomb and fear the technology used to launch space rockets could be diverted into developing long-range ballistic missiles, potentially capable of carrying atomic warheads.

Tehran has long denied having military goals for its space programme or its nuclear drive, and is currently engaged in talks with the United States and other leading powers to end the standoff over its disputed atomic activities.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Microsat News and Nanosat News at SpaceMart.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





MICROSAT BLITZ
Small CubeSat Provides Big Space Experience
Pasadena CA (JPL) Dec 26, 2014
Any way you slice it, space exploration - done right - requires an inordinate range of technical expertise. From designing the spacecraft, the mission proposal and the circuit boards to testing the flight software and putting together budgets, sending something, anything, into the cosmos depends on good people who know their job. "Although significantly smaller in size, CubeSats contain ... read more


MICROSAT BLITZ
Service Module of Chinese Probe Enters Lunar Orbit

Service module of China's lunar orbiter enters 127-minute orbit

Chinese spacecraft to return to moon's orbit

Russian Company Proposes to Build Lunar Base

MICROSAT BLITZ
Gully patterns document Martian climate cycles

The two faces of Mars

Helicopter Could be 'Scout' for Mars Rovers

Hilltop Panorama Marks Mars Rover's 11th Anniversary

MICROSAT BLITZ
Heady days for tech sector 15 years after bubble burst

NASA, Boeing, SpaceX Outline Objectives to ISS Flights

Boeing will be first to carry US astronauts to space

Japanese businessman set to resume space tourist training

MICROSAT BLITZ
More Astronauts for China

China launches the FY-2 08 meteorological satellite successfully

China's Long March puts satellite in orbit on 200th launch

Countdown to China's new space programs begins

MICROSAT BLITZ
NASA's CATS Installed on ISS by Robotic Handoff

Roscosmos, NASA Still Planning on Sending Men Into Space

Russian Cargo Spacecraft to Supply ISS With Black Caviar

Astronauts' year-long mission will test limits

MICROSAT BLITZ
Russia launches British comms satellite into space

Soyuz Installed at Baikonur, Expected to Launch Wednesday

SpaceX releases animation of heavy-lift Falcon rocket

NASA TV Coverage Reset for Launch of Newest Earth-Observing Mission

MICROSAT BLITZ
Dawn ahead!

Smaller Gas Giants Could Support Life

Will NASA's TESS Spacecraft Revolutionize Exoplanet Hunting?

Kepler astronomers discover ancient star with 5 Earth-size planets

MICROSAT BLITZ
How ionic: Scaffolding is in charge of calcium carbonate crystals

Graphene edges can be tailor-made

Scientists 'bend' acoustic and elastic waves with new metamaterials

The laser pulse that gets shorter all by itself




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.