Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















SPACE TRAVEL
International Partners Provide Science Satellites for first SLS mission
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) May 30, 2016


EQUULEUS (EQUilibriUm Lunar-Earth point 6U Spacecraft) will measure the distribution of plasma that surrounds the Earth to help scientists understand the radiation environment in the region of space around Earth. It will also demonstrate low-energy trajectory control techniques, such as multiple lunar flybys, within the Earth-Moon region. Image courtesy JAXA/University of Tokyo. For a larger version of this image please go here.

NASA's new Space Launch System (SLS) will launch America into a new era of exploration to destinations beyond Earth's orbit. On its first flight, NASA will demonstrate the rocket's heavy-lift capability and send an uncrewed Orion spacecraft into deep space. The agency will also take advantage of additional available mass and space to provide the rare opportunity to send more than a dozen small satellites, called CubeSats, to conduct experiments beyond low-Earth orbit. In addition to the 10 CubeSats announced earlier this year, the agency will be sending three from international partners.

"The first SLS launch presents a great opportunity to collaborate with our international partners by providing rides for CubeSats that can pursue independent science and technology missions while supporting our mutual goals for human exploration in deep space," said Steve Creech, acting manager of the Spacecraft and Payload Integration and Evolution Office, which handles integration of the secondary payloads at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, where SLS is managed.

These small satellites are designed to be efficient and versatile-at no heavier than 30 pounds (14 kilograms), they are each about the size of a boot box, and do not require any extra power from the rocket to function. The science and technology experiments enabled by these small satellites may enhance our understanding of the deep space environment, expand our knowledge of the moon, and demonstrate technology that could open up possibilities for future missions.

For the first SLS flight, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the University of Tokyo will jointly create and provide two CubeSats, EQUULEUS (EQUilibriUm Lunar-Earth point 6U Spacecraft) and OMOTENASHI (Outstanding MOon exploration TEchnologies demonstrated by NAno Semi-Hard Impactor). EQUULEUS will help scientists understand the radiation environment in the region of space around Earth by imaging Earth's plasmasphere and measuring the distribution of plasma that surrounds the planet.

This opportunity may provide important insight for protecting both humans and electronics from radiation damage during long space journeys. It will also demonstrate low-energy trajectory control techniques, such as multiple lunar flybys, within the Earth-Moon region.

JAXA also will use the OMOTENASHI to demonstrate the technology for low-cost and very small spacecraft to explore the lunar surface. This technology could open up new possibilities for future missions to inexpensively investigate the surface of the moon. The CubeSat will also take measurements of the radiation environment near the moon as well as on the lunar surface.

"It is an exciting opportunity to go to the region of space near the moon with the Orion spacecraft on the historic first flight of SLS. In the near future, industry, academia, and even individuals will be able to, and should, easily participate in space exploration. To realize such a world, small and low cost spacecraft will be indispensable," said Dr. Hashimoto, Professor of JAXA who leads the JAXA two CubeSats development.

"JAXA proposed two exploration CubeSats, using Japanese advanced technologies for small spacecraft and collaborating with the University of Tokyo. Considering the mass and size limitations, it is a big challenge, but it will be a valuable first step to the new era."

The Italian company Argotec is building the ArgoMoon CubeSat under the Italian Space Agency (ASI) internal review and approval process. ArgoMoon will demonstrate the ability to perform operations in close proximity of the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), which will send Orion onto its lunar trajectory. It should also record images of the ICPS for historical documentation and to provide valuable mission data on the deployment of other Cubesats. Additionally, this CubeSat should test optical communication capabilities between the CubeSat and Earth.

"ASI is excited to share in this endeavor through the involvement of an Italian CubeSat and to test such technology in a deep space environment, which is a first for this class of satellite," said Arturo De Lillis, Argomoon program manager.

The ArgoMoon CubeSat proposal was put forth by the European Space Agency (ESA) in coordination with its member state, Italy.

"This could be the first European cubesat to leave Earth orbit and we are looking forward to it capturing historic images of the first Orion mission," says David Parker, ESA Director of Human Spaceflight and Robotic Exploration.

All the CubeSats will ride to space inside the Orion Stage Adapter, which sits between the ICPS and Orion. The CubeSats will be deployed following Orion separation from the upper stage and once Orion is a safe distance away.

SLS will have the payload capacity needed to carry crew and cargo for deep space exploration missions, including the journey to Mars. These small satellites are essentially piggybacking on the SLS flight and gaining an affordable opportunity to reach deep space destinations.

Currently, most launch opportunities for CubeSats are limited to low-Earth orbit, the destination of the majority of today's rockets. Although they may come in small packages, the science and technology investigations enabled by these Cubesats will help play a role in paving the way for future human exploration in deep space, including the journey to Mars.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Space Launch System
Space Tourism, Space Transport and Space Exploration News






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
SPACE TRAVEL
Russia Helps Guatemalan Man Become His Country's First Cosmonaut
Moscow (Sputnik) May 26, 2016
Vinicio Montoya de Leon, a 49-year old native of Guatemala, is set to become the first Central American astronaut in history by late 2018 - early 2019. The chain of events that led an ordinary Guatemalan dentist to become a successful candidate for a space flight is nothing short of remarkable. "My life used to be pretty erratic, but after getting into a traffic accident I reexamined my prioriti ... read more


SPACE TRAVEL
A new, water-logged history of the Moon

Russian Firm Develops Project of Reusable Spacecraft for Lunar Missions

SwRI scientists discover fresh lunar craters

NASA research gives new insights into how the Moon got inked

SPACE TRAVEL
Red and Golden Planets at Opposition

Mars makes closest approach to Earth in 11 years

SwRI scientists discover evidence of ice age at Martian north pole

Opportunity investigating soil exposed by rover wheel

SPACE TRAVEL
International Partners Provide Science Satellites for first SLS mission

India Presses Ahead With Space Ambitions

Fun LoL to Teach Machines How to Learn More Efficiently

'Metabolomics: You Are What You Eat' video

SPACE TRAVEL
Chine's satellite industry eyes global satellite market

Bolivia takes over operations of Chinese-built satellite

NASA Chief: Congress Should Revise US-China Space Cooperation Law

China launches new satellite for civilian hi-res mapping

SPACE TRAVEL
BEAM Leak Checks Before Crew Enters Next Week

HERA Mission 10 Crew to "Splashdown" on Wednesday

One Carbon Metabolism on the Space Station

Zuckerberg streams live chat with men in space

SPACE TRAVEL
United Launch Alliance gets $138 million Atlas V contract

EchoStar XVIII and BRIsat are installed on Arianespace's Ariane 5

SpaceX makes fourth successful rocket landing

Arianespace to supply payload dispenser systems for OneWeb constellation

SPACE TRAVEL
Astronomers find giant planet around very young star

Planet 1,200 Light-Years Away Is Good Prospect for a Habitable World

Kepler-223 System Offers Clues to Planetary Migration

Star Has Four Mini-Neptunes Orbiting in Lock Step

SPACE TRAVEL
Compound switches between liquid and solid states when exposed to light or heat

Multifunction Phase Array Radar (MPAR)

Schafer Corp launches new venture in Commercial Space Situational Awareness

Believe the hype? How virtual reality could change your life




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement