Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




WATER WORLD
Great Barrier Reef dredge dumping plan could be shelved
by Staff Writers
Sydney (AFP) Sept 02, 2014


An India-backed mining consortium could shelve controversial plans to dump dredging waste in the Great Barrier Reef, with alternative sites on land being considered amid growing environmental concerns, Australia said Tuesday.

Environment Minister Greg Hunt said there was an "emerging option" that could see the consortium -- India's Adani Group and Australia's North Queensland Bulk Ports and GVK Hancock -- submit a proposal suggesting onshore dumping locations.

"There is an emerging option which I've said we'd welcome and consider on its merits," Hunt told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

"I can't put a time frame. It may be a month, it may be less, it may not occur. But we have encouraged and invited (another option)."

The minister's comments followed a report in The Australian Financial Review that the government-approved marine dumping plan would be abandoned to neutralise controversy over the possible damage it could cause to the World Heritage site.

Conservationists have said the dumping of three million cubic metres of material dredged from the seabed as part of a major coal port expansion at Abbot Point -- on the Great Barrier Reef coast in Queensland -- could hasten the natural wonder's demise.

The dredging, which was approved in January, will allow freighters to dock at Abbot Point, increasing the coal port's capacity by 70 percent to make it one of the world's largest.

The Greens party, which has criticised the reef dumping proposal, said its approval should be revoked.

"Onshore disposal would be a far better option environmentally and for the tourism and fishing industries, however the problems of increased shipping and export of coal to exacerbate climate change remain," Greens' environment spokesman Larissa Waters said.

Activist group Greenpeace "cautiously welcomed" the "good news", but warned there were still concerns.

"If the reports are true, the cheapest, most destructive option for expanding Abbot Point may have been taken off the table -- but the threat from coal industry expansion plans is still urgent," spokesman Adam Walters said.

The Australian Conservation Foundation's climate change campaigner Abigail Jabines said the dredging itself was a danger to the reef.

"Even if the spoil is not dumped at sea, the dredging itself has environmental impacts, with dredge plumes damaging sea grass meadows, which are an important habitat for turtles and dugongs," she said.

The number of dugongs -- a long-living but slow-breeding mammal -- are declining in reef water although species such as humpback whales and loggerhead turtles are growing, a Great Barrier Marine Park Authority report said last month.

The same report warned the reef was "under pressure" from climate change, poor water quality from land-based run-off and the impacts from coastal development with the outlook for the natural wonder rated "poor".

UNESCO in June deferred listing the reef as in danger and gave Australia until February 1, 2015 to submit a report on what it was doing to protect the biodiverse site.

.


Related Links
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Marine protected areas inadequate for protecting fish and ocean ecology
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 01, 2014
A new study reports that an expansion of marine protected areas is needed to protect fish species that perform key ecological functions. According to investigators from the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations, previous efforts at protecting fish have focused on saving the largest numbers of species, often at the expense of those species that provide key and difficult-to-replace ... read more


WATER WORLD
China Aims for the Moon, Plans to Bring Back Lunar Soil

Electric Sparks May Alter Evolution of Lunar Soil

China to test recoverable moon orbiter

China to send orbiter to moon and back

WATER WORLD
Scientist uncovers red planet's climate history in unique meteorite

A Salty, Martian Meteorite Offers Clues to Habitability

Opportunity Mars Rover Suffers a Series of Resets

Mars Rover Team Chooses Not to Drill 'Bonanza King'

WATER WORLD
US to Stop Using Soyuz Spacecraft, Invest in Domestic Private Space Industry

25 Years After Neptune: Reflections on Voyager

Long-term spaceflights challenged as harm to astronauts' health revealed

Voyager Map Details Neptune's Strange Moon Triton

WATER WORLD
Same-beam VLBI Tech monitors Chang'E-3 movement on moon

China Sends Remote-Sensing Satellite into Orbit

More Tasks for China's Moon Mission

China's Circumlunar Spacecraft Unmasked

WATER WORLD
NASA Awaits Boeing's Completion of Soyuz Replacement

Belka and Strelka, the canine cosmonauts

Russian Cosmonauts Conclude EVA Ahead of Schedule

Orbital cargo ship makes planned re-entry to Earth

WATER WORLD
Sea Launch Takes Proactive Steps to Address Manifest Gap

SpaceX rocket explodes during test flight

Russian Cosmonauts Carry Out Science-Oriented Spacewalk Outside ISS

Optus 10 delivered to French Guiana for Ariane 5 Sept launch

WATER WORLD
Orion Rocks! Pebble-Size Particles May Jump-Start Planet Formation

Rotation of Planets Influences Habitability

Planet-like object may have spent its youth as hot as a star

Young binary star system may form planets with weird and wild orbits

WATER WORLD
The power of salt

Researchers map quantum vortices inside superfluid helium nanodroplets

NASA Probes Studying Earth's Radiation Belts to Celebrate Two Year Anniversary

US Space Debris Tracking Site To Be Build In Western Australia




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.