Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
From nanocrystals to earthquakes, solid materials share similar failure characteristics
by Staff Writers
Chicago IL (SPX) Nov 23, 2015


When solid materials such as nanocrystals, bulk metallic glasses, rocks, or granular materials are slowly deformed by compression or shear, they slip intermittently with slip-avalanches similar to earthquakes. Image courtesy University of Illinois. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Apparently, size doesn't always matter. An extensive study by an interdisciplinary research group suggests that the deformation properties of nanocrystals are not much different from those of the Earth's crust.

"When solid materials such as nanocrystals, bulk metallic glasses, rocks, or granular materials are slowly deformed by compression or shear, they slip intermittently with slip-avalanches similar to earthquakes," explained Karin Dahmen, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

"Typically these systems are studied separately. But we found that the scaling behavior of their slip statistics agree across a surprisingly wide range of different length scales and material structures."

"Identifying agreement in aspects of the slip statistics is important, because it enables us to transfer results from one scale to another, from one material to another, from one stress to another, or from one strain rate to another," stated Shivesh Pathak, a physics undergraduate at Illinois, and a co-author of the paper, "Universal Quake Statistics: From Compressed Nanocrystals to Earthquakes," appearing in Scientific Reports.

"The study shows how to identify and explain commonalities in the deformation mechanisms of different materials on different scales.

"The results provide new tools and methods to use the slip statistics to predict future materials deformation," added Michael LeBlanc, a physics graduate student and co-author of the paper. "They also clarify which system parameters significantly affect the deformation behavior on long length scales. We expect the results to be useful for applications in materials testing, failure prediction, and hazard prevention."

Researchers representing a broad a range of disciplines--including physics, geosciences, mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, and materials science--from the United States, Germany, and the Netherlands contributed to the study, comparing five different experimental systems, on several different scales, with model predictions.

As a solid is sheared, each weak spot is stuck until the local shear stress exceeds a random failure threshold. It then slips by a random amount until it re-sticks. The released stress is redistributed to all other weak spots. Thus, a slipping weak spot can trigger other spots to fail in a slip avalanche.

Using tools from the theory of phase transitions, such as the renormalization group, one can show that the slip statistics of the model do not depend on the details of the system.

"Although these systems span 13 decades in length scale, they all show the same scaling behavior for their slip size distributions and other statistical properties," stated Pathak. "Their size distributions follow the same simple (power law) function, multiplied with the same exponential cutoff."

The cutoff, which is the largest slip or earthquake size, grows with applied force for materials spanning length scales from nanometers to kilometers. The dependence of the size of the largest slip or quake on stress reflects "tuned critical" behavior, rather than so-called self-organized criticality, which would imply stress-independence.

"The agreement of the scaling properties of the slip statistics across scales does not imply the predictability of individual slips or earthquakes," LeBlanc said. "Rather, it implies that we can predict the scaling behavior of average properties of the slip statistics and the probability of slips of a certain size, including their dependence on stress and strain-rate."

Study co-authors include Jonathan Uhl, Xin Liu, Ryan Swindeman, Nir Friedman, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Danijel Schorlemmer and Georg Dresen, German Research Centre for Geosciences; Danijel Schorlemmer and Thorsten Becker, University of Southern California; Robert Behringer, Duke University; Dmitry Denisov and Peter Schall, University of Amsterdam; Xiaojun Gu, Wendelin J. Wright, Xiaojun Gu and Wendelin J. Wright, Bucknell University; Todd Hufnagel, Johns Hopkins University; Andrew Jennings and Julia R. Greer, California Institute of Technology; and P.K. Liaw, The University of Tennessee; Georgios Tsekenis, Harvard, and Braden Brinkman, Seattle, were part of Dahmen's research group during the original study.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of Illinois College of Engineering
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
TECH SPACE
Primordial goo used to improve implants
Canberra, Australia (SPX) Nov 23, 2015
Australia's national science research organisation, CSIRO, has developed an innovative new coating that could be used to improve medical devices and implants, thanks to a "goo" thought to be have been home to the building blocks of life. The molecules from this primordial goo - known as prebiotic compounds - can be traced back billions of years and have been studied intensively since their ... read more


TECH SPACE
Gaia's sensors scan a lunar transit

SwRI scientists explain why moon rocks contain fewer volatiles than Earth's

All-female Russian crew starts Moon mission test

Russian moon mission would need 4 Angara-A5V launches

TECH SPACE
A witness to a wet early Mars

NASA completes heat shield testing for future Mars exploration vehicles

Curiosity Mars Rover Heads Toward Active Dunes

Upgrade Helps NASA Study Mineral Veins on Mars

TECH SPACE
XCOR develops Lynx Simulator

Orion ingenuity improves manufacturing while reducing mass

Orion's European module ready for testing

General Dynamics demos SGSS Command and Control Infrastructure for NASA

TECH SPACE
China to launch Dark Matter Satellite in mid-December

China to better integrate satellite applications with Internet

China's satellite expo opens

New rocket readies for liftoff in 2016

TECH SPACE
Space-grown flowers will be new year blooms on International Space Station

Cygnus Launch Poised to Bolster Station Science, Supplies

Progress cargo spacecraft to be launched Dec 21

Space station power short circuits, system repairs needed

TECH SPACE
NASA Selects New Technologies for Parabolic Flights and Suborbital Launches

United Launch Alliance exits launch competition, leaving SpaceX

Spaceport America opens up two new campuses

Recycled power plant equipment bolsters ULA in its energy efficiency

TECH SPACE
Forming planet observed for first time

UA researchers capture first photo of planet in making

Rocket Scientists to Launch Planet-Finding Telescope

5400mph winds discovered hurtling around planet outside solar system

TECH SPACE
Primordial goo used to improve implants

From nanocrystals to earthquakes, solid materials share similar failure characteristics

UW team refrigerates liquids with a laser for the first time

Network analysis shows systemic risk in mineral markets




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement