Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Economist warns of 'radical' climate change, millions at risk
by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) April 2, 2013


Top NASA climate change expert retiring
Washington (AFP) April 2, 2013 - Pioneering NASA climatologist James Hansen, one of the first scientists to raise the alarm about global warming, is retiring after 46 years, a colleague confirmed to AFP on Tuesday.

Hansen, 72, who headed the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, announced his departure in an email to the New York Times on Monday.

The Times reported Hansen was stepping down to allow himself to campaign more aggressively for legislation to cut greenhouse gases.

Hansen first rose to prominence in 1988 when his testimony at a highly publicized US Congressional hearing thrust the issue of man-made climate change onto the political agenda.

His work has often been attacked by climate change skeptics while his activism has also brought him into conflict with the federal government, most notably when the administration of George W. Bush sought to muzzle him in 2005.

Gavin Schmidt, deputy chief of the Goddard Institute, was quoted as saying that Hansen "has been at the forefront of almost every conceptual advance in climate in science over 40 years."

"The stuff that Jim wrote 20 years ago has set the tone for the whole field [and the] predictions he made have generally worked out very favorably," Schmidt said.

Republicans favor action on climate change
Fairfax, Va. (UPI) Apr 2, 2013 - A majority of Republicans in the United States think America should take steps to address climate change, a poll indicates.

In the poll conducted by the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University, 62 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning Independents said they feel action is necessary to deal with climate change.

The survey conducted in January polled more than 700 people who self-identified as Republicans and Republican-leaning Independents about energy and climate change, a university release reported Tuesday.

"Over the past few years, our surveys have shown that a growing number of Republicans want to see Congress do more to address climate change," Mason Professor Edward Maibach said. "In this survey, we asked a broader set of questions to see if we could better understand how Republicans, and Independents who have a tendency to vote Republican, think about America's energy and climate change situation."

Respondents, by a 2 to 1 margin, said America should take action to reduce its fossil fuel use and that the benefits of clean energy outweigh the costs of increased government regulation or higher energy prices.

Only a third of respondents said they agreed with the Republican Party's present position on climate issues.

"The findings from this survey suggest there is considerable support among conservatives for accelerating the transition away from fossil fuels and toward clean renewable forms of energy, and for taking steps to address climate change," Maibach said.

"Perhaps the most surprising finding, however, is how few of our survey respondents agreed with the Republican Party's current position on climate change."

The poll was conducted between Jan. 12 and Jan. 27, with an average margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

The author of an influential 2006 study on climate change warned Tuesday that the world could be headed toward warming even more catastrophic than expected but he voiced hope for political action.

Nicholas Stern, the British former chief economist for the World Bank, said that both emissions of greenhouse gas and the effects of climate change were taking place faster than he forecast seven years ago.

Without changes to emission trends, the planet has roughly a 50 percent chance that temperatures will soar to five degrees Celsius (nine degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial averages in a century, he said.

"We haven't been above five degrees Centigrade on this planet for about 30 million years. So you can see that this is radical change way outside human experience," Stern said in an address at the International Monetary Fund.

"When we were at three degrees Centigrade three million years ago, the sea levels were about 20 some meters (65 feet) above now. On sea level rise of just two meters, probably a couple of hundred million people would have to move," he said.

Stern said that other effects would come more quickly including the expansion of deserts and the melting of Himalayan snows that supply rivers on which up to two billion people depend.

Even if nations fulfill pledges made in 2010 at a UN-led conference in Cancun, Mexico, the world would be on track to warming of four degrees (7.2 Fahrenheit), he said.

Stern's 2006 study, considered a landmark in raising public attention on climate change, predicted that warming would shave at least five percent of gross domestic product per year.

Despite the slow progress in international negotiations, Stern saw signs for hope as a number of countries move to put a price on greenhouse gases.

"My own view is that 2013 is the best possible year to try to work and redouble our efforts to create the political will that hitherto has been much too weak," Stern said.

Stern said that French President Francois Hollande was keen for nations to meet their goal of sealing an accord in 2015 in Paris.

Stern also voiced hope that German Chancellor Angela Merkel, long a prominent voice on climate change, would become more active after this year's elections.

US President Barack Obama has vowed action on climate change after an earlier bid was thwarted by lawmakers of the rival Republican Party, many of whom reject the science behind climate change.

Emissions have risen sharply in recent years from emerging economies, particularly China.

.


Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
Earth's Interior Cycles a Contributor to Long-Term Sea-Level and Climate Change
New York NY (SPX) Mar 24, 2013
Ancient rises in sea levels and global warming are partially attributable to cyclical activity below the earth's surface, researchers from New York University and Ottawa's Carleton University have concluded in an analysis of geological studies. However, the article's authors, NYU's Michael Rampino and Carleton University's Andreas Prokoph, note that changes spurred by the earth's interior ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
Lunar cycle determines hunting behaviour of nocturnal gulls

Ultraviolet spectrograph observes mercury and hydrogen in GRAIL impact plumes

NASA's LRO Sees GRAIL's Explosive Farewell

Amazon's Bezos recovers Apollo 11 engines

CLIMATE SCIENCE
SwRI study finds liquid water flowing above and below frozen Alaskan sand dunes, hints of a wetter Mars

Opportunity Moves Into Place for Quiet Period of Operations

Measuring Mars: The MAVEN Magnetometer

Opportunity Heads to Matijevic Hill

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Miners shoot for the stars in tech race

Space Innovation Center Will Help Govt Agencies Launch Future Space Missions

The Future of Exploration Starts With 3-D Printing

Lockheed Martin to Continue Providing Life Sciences Support To NASA

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Shenzhou 10 sent to launch site

China's Next Women Astronauts

Shenzhou 10 - Next Stop: Jiuquan

China's fourth space launch center to be in use in two years

CLIMATE SCIENCE
New crew takes express ride to space station

Soyuz Docks At Space Station Four Orbits After Launch

Three astronauts blast off on express ride to ISS

Russia may recycle space station modules

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Future Looks Bright for Private US Space Ventures

Europe's next ATV resupply spacecraft enters final preparatio?ns for its Ariane 5 launch

ILS Proton Launches Satmex 8 Satellite for Satmex

When quality counts: Arianespace reaffirms its North American market presence

CLIMATE SCIENCE
The Great Exoplanet Debate

Astronomers Detect Water in Atmosphere of Distant Planet

Distant planetary system is a super-sized solar system

Water signature in distant planet shows clues to its formation

CLIMATE SCIENCE
CO2 could produce valuable chemical cheaply

Catalyst in a teacup: New approach to chemical reduction

Lasers could yield particle research tool

Paint-on plastic electronics: Aligning polymers for high performance




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement