Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
Chemical design made easier
by Staff Writers
Houston TX (SPX) Nov 30, 2015


An illustration details the single-step, single-flask process by which Rice University scientists have simplified the rapid synthesis of small-molecule catalysts. The catalysts promise to speed the process of making novel chemicals, including drugs. Image courtesy Laszlo Kurti/Rice University. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Rice University scientists using an efficient metal-free process have synthesized dozens of small-molecule catalysts, tools that promise to speed the making of novel chemicals, including drugs. The lab of synthetic chemist Laszlo Kurti made elusive chiral biaryl compounds in a single-flask process that does not require the use of transition metals.

These biaryls are called organocatalysts because they catalyze chemical reactions without metal ions. They eliminate the need for transition metals and simplify chemical processes to synthesize new molecules. Transition metals are conductive metals that include titanium, iron, nickel, silver, copper, palladium and gold and are commonly used in catalysis.

The new tools detailed in the Angewandte Chemie international edition open avenues for faster and more cost-effective chemical synthesis, Kurti said.

Biaryls are molecular compounds of two aromatic rings directly joined by a carbon-carbon bond. When functionalized, or altered, these biaryls (phenyl-phenyl, naphthyl-phenyl, thienyl-naphthyl and more) become highly selective, reliable and customizable catalysts, Kurti said.

Kurti's research uses biaryls as catalysts to develop novel single-enantiomer compounds.

Enantiomers are asymmetrical molecules found among organic compounds. Like one's hands, their structures are mirror images that cannot be superimposed on each other. Significantly, these twins can have radically different effects - one beneficial, one not - as they interact with enzymes, proteins, receptors and even other chiral catalysts. Pharmaceutical companies understandably want to make drugs that contain only the helpful enantiomer.

Currently, single-enantiomer compounds are painstakingly synthesized as building blocks for drugs, agricultural products and functional materials.

Kurti said that by decade's end, 95 percent of chiral drugs will be sold as single enantiomers. But synthesizing one particular enantiomer with precision and high efficiency is hard, especially via trial-and-error approaches that to now often require transition metal catalysts.

"For enantiomer preparations, you need catalysts," he said, but transition metals are expensive and can leave toxic residues that need to be removed before the compound can be used in clinical trials. The Rice lab's simple, cost-effective way to make chiral-functionalized biaryls not only eliminates the need for transition metals but can replace many steps in the synthesis process. Each step can take days or weeks.

"That's the basis of what we do: Develop new methods," Kurti said. "Part of my program is coming up with new catalyst structures. When we were looking at the various ways to put such compounds together, we stumbled upon this very interesting reaction."

The lab combined readily available compounds, including quinone monoacetal and naphthol, to make functionalized biaryls. "This is a major advance," he said. "Using these building blocks, we made 41 different chiral biaryl compounds in a relatively short time.

"The functionalized chiral biaryls are really versatile compounds. You can use them outright as organocatalysts or complex them with transition metals to make new transition-metal catalysts. So the possibilities are unlimited. Moreover, these compounds can be used as building blocks en route to natural products with biaryl substructures in them."

He said the biaryls "open up an entire world of new chemical space," as they lower the barrier to inventing and making new chemical compounds.

"The implications are huge," Kurti said. "This will certainly find its way into drug discovery, making agrochemicals and many other fine chemicals."

Co-authors of the paper are postdoctoral researcher Hongyin Gao and graduate student Craig Keene of Rice; Qing-Long Xu, a former postdoctoral researcher in the Kurti group who is now a professor of chemistry at China Pharmaceutical University; Muhammed Yousufuddin, a lecturer of chemistry at the University of North Texas at Dallas; and Daniel Ess, a professor of chemistry at Brigham Young University. Kurti is an associate professor of chemistry at Rice.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Rice University
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
TECH SPACE
Creating a new vision for multifunctional materials
Boston MA (SPX) Nov 26, 2015
Multifunctional materials with sensory capabilities like those of vision, touch or even smell could profoundly expand the possibilities of industrial design in many areas. Taking a cue from nature, a cross-institutional collaboration involving researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and MIT has deciphered how the biomineral making up the bo ... read more


TECH SPACE
Gaia's sensors scan a lunar transit

SwRI scientists explain why moon rocks contain fewer volatiles than Earth's

All-female Russian crew starts Moon mission test

Russian moon mission would need 4 Angara-A5V launches

TECH SPACE
Study: Mars to become a ringed planet following death of its moon

A witness to a wet early Mars

NASA completes heat shield testing for future Mars exploration vehicles

Curiosity Mars Rover Heads Toward Active Dunes

TECH SPACE
XCOR develops Lynx Simulator

Orion ingenuity improves manufacturing while reducing mass

Orion's European module ready for testing

General Dynamics demos SGSS Command and Control Infrastructure for NASA

TECH SPACE
China to launch Dark Matter Satellite in mid-December

China to better integrate satellite applications with Internet

China's satellite expo opens

New rocket readies for liftoff in 2016

TECH SPACE
ISS EarthKAM ready for student imaging request

Partners in Science: Private Companies Conduct Valuable Research on the Space Station

SAGE III Leaves Langley for Journey to ISS

New Crew to Stay Aboard ISS for 7 Months Instead of 6

TECH SPACE
NASA Orders SpaceX Crew Mission to International Space Station

NASA Selects New Technologies for Parabolic Flights and Suborbital Launches

United Launch Alliance exits launch competition, leaving SpaceX

Spaceport America opens up two new campuses

TECH SPACE
Forming planet observed for first time

UA researchers capture first photo of planet in making

Rocket Scientists to Launch Planet-Finding Telescope

5400mph winds discovered hurtling around planet outside solar system

TECH SPACE
Creating a new vision for multifunctional materials

3-D printing aids in understanding food enjoyment

Success in producing a completely rare-earth free Feni magnet

Bringing the chaos in light sources under control




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement