Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















Cartwheel Galaxy Makes Waves In New NASA Image

This false-color composite image shows the Cartwheel galaxy as seen by Galaxy Evolution Explorer in ultraviolet light (blue); the Hubble Space Telescope in visible light (green); the Spitzer Space Telescope in infrared (red); and the Chandra x-Ray Observatory (purple). "The dramatic plunge has left the Cartwheel galaxy with a crisp, bright ring around a zone of relative calm," said astronomer Phil Appleton of the California Institute of Technology. "Usually a galaxy is brighter toward the center, but the ultraviolet view indicates the collision actually smoothed out the interior of the galaxy, concentrating older stars and dust into the inner regions. It's like the calm after the storm of star formation." The outer ring, which is bigger than the entire Milky Way galaxy, appears blue and violet in the image. Image Credit: NASA, JPL, Caltech, R. Hurt (SSC). Text Credit: NASA, JPL, Caltech, Jane Platt (JPL).

Pasadena CA (JPL) Jan 12, 2006
A new image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer completes a multi-wavelength, neon-colored portrait of the enormous Cartwheel galaxy after a smaller galaxy plunged through it, triggering ripples of sudden, brief star formation.

The false-color composite image shows the Cartwheel galaxy as seen by Galaxy Evolution Explorer in ultraviolet light (blue); the Hubble Space Telescope in visible light (green); the Spitzer Space Telescope in infrared (red); and the Chandra X-ray Observatory (purple).

"The dramatic plunge has left the Cartwheel galaxy with a crisp, bright ring around a zone of relative calm," said astronomer Phil Appleton of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.

"Usually a galaxy is brighter toward the center, but the ultraviolet view indicates the collision actually smoothed out the interior of the galaxy, concentrating older stars and dust into the inner regions. It's like the calm after the storm of star formation." The outer ring, which is bigger than the entire Milky Way galaxy, appears blue and violet in the image.

Recently-observed features include concentric rings rippling out from the impact area in a series of star formation waves, ending in the outermost ring. "It's like dropping a stone into a pond, only in this case, the pond is the galaxy, and the wave is the compression of gas," said Appleton. "Each wave represents a burst of star formation, with the youngest stars found in the outer ring."

Previously, scientists believed the ring marked the outermost edge of the galaxy, but the latest Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations detect a faint disk, not visible in this image, that extends to twice the diameter of the ring. This means the Cartwheel is a monstrous 2.5 times the size of the Milky Way.

Most galaxies have only one or two bright X-ray sources, usually associated with gas falling onto a black hole from a companion star. The Cartwheel has a dozen. Appleton said that makes sense, because black holes thrive in areas where massive stars are forming and dying fast.

The Cartwheel galaxy is one of the brightest ultraviolet energy sources in the local universe. In some visible-light images, it appears to have spokes. Appleton has just presented his finding at the 207th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington.

His research collaborators included Armando Gil de Paz of Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain; and Barry Madore of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, Calif. The team's observations were a follow-up to studies made by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer science team's Nearby Galaxy Survey.

Related Links
Caltech
NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer
SpaceDaily
Search SpaceDaily
Subscribe To SpaceDaily Express



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Sloan Survey Identifies New Dwarf Galaxy Inside Milky Way
Washington DC (SPX) Jan 10, 2006
Astronomers using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey have discovered a previously unknown cluster of stars within the Milky Way that appears to be a separate dwarf galaxy being consumed by its much larger neighbor.







  • NASA Refines Design For Crew Exploration Vehicle
  • Microbes Survive Firey Plunge By Columbia
  • Spicing Up Space Meals
  • SpaceDev Appoints New Chief Executive Officer And Vice Chairman

  • Opportunity Snaps A Fine Example Of A 'Festoon' Pattern In Meridiani Outcrop
  • Opportunity Puts The Arm On Ted
  • Spirit Heading To 'Home Plate'
  • Mars Exploration Rovers Advance Understanding Of The Red Planet

  • Soyuz To Launch Radarsat-2
  • CAGW Criticizes Subsidies For ULA Satellite Launches
  • Europe's Arianespace Satellite Launcher Hits Cruising Speed
  • ILS to Launch ASTRA 1KR in 2006

  • New Legislation Initiated To Support Commercial Remote Sensing Industry
  • Indian Small EO Satellites To Study Atmosphere
  • Space Imaging Awarded Additional $24 Mln From Pentagon's NGA
  • NG Ships First Advanced Tech Microwave Sounder Flight Instrument To NASA

  • New Horizons Remains On Course For January 17 Launch To Pluto
  • Scientists Show Pluto To Be Colder Than It Should Be
  • Astronomers Measure The Most Distant Moon
  • New Horizons Launch Vehicle Fully Assembled For Voyage To Pluto

  • Cartwheel Galaxy Makes Waves In New NASA Image
  • Astronomers Detect Largest Cluster Of Red Supergiants
  • Integral Identifies Supernova Rate For Milky Way
  • Large Survey Of Galaxies Yields New Findings On Star Formation

  • Apollo Chronicles
  • An Explosion On The Moon
  • SMART 1 Uses New Imaging Technique In Lunar Orbit
  • Moon Storms

  • Galileo GIOVEA Using Marotta Equipment For Its Propulsion Systems
  • SiRFstarIII Featured in TomToms Innovative Portable Navigation Product
  • EGNOS Demonstration In South Africa
  • Europe Opens Up Civil Navigation System With Galileo Satellite

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement