Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




EARTH OBSERVATION
Breaking waves perturb Earth's magnetic field
by Staff Writers
Durham NH (SPX) May 12, 2015


File image.

The underlying physical process that creates striking "breaking wave" cloud patterns in our atmosphere also frequently opens the gates to high-energy solar wind plasma that perturbs Earth's magnetic field, or magnetosphere, which protects us from cosmic radiation. The discovery was made by two University of New Hampshire space physicists, who published their findings in the online journal Nature Communications Monday, May 11, 2015.

The phenomenon involves ultra low-frequency Kelvin-Helmholtz waves, which are ubiquitous throughout the universe and create the distinctive patterns--from Earth's clouds and ocean surfaces to the atmosphere of Jupiter--but were not thought to be a common mechanism for changing the dynamics of the magnetosphere.

"Our paper shows that the waves, which are created by what's known as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, happens much more frequently than previously thought," says coauthor Joachim "Jimmy" Raeder of the UNH Space Science Center within the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space. "And this is significant because whenever the edge of Earth's magnetosphere, the magnetopause, gets rattled it will create waves that propagate everywhere in the magnetosphere, which in turn can energize or de-energize the particles in the radiation belts."

Using data from NASA's Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission, Raeder and his Ph.D. student Shiva Kavosi (lead author) found that Kelvin-Helmholtz waves actually occur 20 percent of the time at the magnetopause and can change the energy levels of our planet's radiation belts.

These changing energy levels can have impacts on how the radiation belts either protect or threaten spacecraft and Earth-based technologies. But Raeder notes the finding is less about the affects of so-called "space weather" on space- and Earth-based communications and more about a better understanding of the basic physics of how the magnetosphere works.

"It's another piece of the puzzle," Raeder says. "Previously, people thought Kelvin-Helmholtz waves at the magnetopause would be rare, but we found it happens all the time."

The effect of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability waves (named for 19th century scientists Lord William Thomson Kelvin and Hermann von Helmholtz) can commonly be seen in cloud patterns, on the surface of oceans or lakes, or even a backyard pool. The distinctive waves with capped tops and cloudless troughs are created by what's known as velocity shear, which occurs when a fluid or two different fluids--wind and water, for example--interact at different speeds to create differing pressures at the back and front ends of the wave.

Notes Kavosi, "In clouds, you see it because the lower atmosphere is more stagnant and you have a higher speed wind going over it, which creates that distinctive swirl pattern. The phenomenon is really ubiquitous in nature. Often, the waves are present in the atmosphere but not visible if there are no clouds. In that case, pilots cannot see them and aircraft may experience severe and unexpected turbulence."

The five-satellite THEMIS mission launched in 2007 and has provided a unique, long-term dataset that allowed Kavosi and Raeder to do robust statistical analysis of the occurrence of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. Raeder has been a co-investigator on the THEMIS mission since its conception more than 15 years ago and continues to analyze the data in collaboration with his graduate students.

"Previous missions were either too short or the observations didn't occur in the right place," Raeder says. "THEMIS's elliptical orbits achieved over one thousand magnetopause crossings and provided unprecedented observations. We didn't have a database like this before and therefore couldn't do the analysis."

Nature Communications paper, "Ubiquity of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves at Earth's magnetopause".


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of New Hampshire
Earth Observation News - Suppiliers, Technology and Application






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EARTH OBSERVATION
MOU between ISRO Department of Land Resources to beef up EO capacity
New Delhi, India (SPX) May 05, 2015
A function for signing the MOU between Department of Land Resources and NRSC for developing the Bhuvan Geoportal - Srishti and the mobile application Drishti was organized on 29.4.2015 in presence of Shri Birender Singh, Hon'ble Minister of Rural Development, in the Krishi Bhavan New Delhi. The MOU was signed by Dr. Sandeep Dave, Joint Secretary, Department of Land Resources and Dr. V K Da ... read more


EARTH OBSERVATION
Russia Invites China to Join in Creating Lunar Station

Japan to land first unmanned spacecraft on moon in 2018

Dating the moon-forming impact event with meteorites

Japan to land probe on the moon in 2018

EARTH OBSERVATION
Traffic Around Mars Gets Busy

Rock Spire in 'Spirit of St. Louis Crater' on Mars

Rover on the Lookout for Dust Devils

UAE opens space center to oversee mission to Mars

EARTH OBSERVATION
NASA Confirms Electromagnetic Drive Produces Thrust in Vacuum

NASA pushes back against proposal to slash climate budget

Hawaii Says 'Aloha' to NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator

Blue Origin first vehicle test deemed success

EARTH OBSERVATION
Xinhua Insight: How China joins space club?

Chinese scientists mull power station in space

China completes second test on new carrier rocket's power system

China's Yutu rover reveals Moon's "complex" geological history

EARTH OBSERVATION
Progress Incident Not Threatening Orbital Station, Work of Crew

Russia loses control of unmanned spacecraft

Japanese astronaut to arrive in ISS in May

Liquid crystal bubbles experiment arrives at International Space Station

EARTH OBSERVATION
ILS And Dauria announce Proton/Angara dual launch services agreement

SpaceX to test 'eject-button' for astronauts

India to launch 6 more satellites in 2015-16

Arianespace to launch HellaSat-4/SGS-1 for Arabsat and KACST

EARTH OBSERVATION
New exoplanet too big for its star

Robotically discovering Earth's nearest neighbors

Astronomers join forces to speed discovery of habitable worlds

Titan's Atmosphere Useful In Study Of Hazy Exoplanets

EARTH OBSERVATION
Real stereotypes continue to exist in virtual worlds

See flower cells in 3-D - no electron microscopy required

Northwestern scientists develop first liquid nanolaser

Rubber from dandelions




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.