Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .

Subscribe free to our newsletters via your

Aurora borealis could make New Year's Eve appearance
by Brooks Hays
Boulder, Colo. (UPI) Dec 30, 2015

disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only

Earlier this week, NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center reported an M1 solar flare and associated coronal mass ejection. The resulting geomagnetic storm hit Earth Wednesday morning.

The center's forecast, published Tuesday, predicted a stronger G3 storm to last through Wednesday and a lesser G1 storm to persist through Thursday. The storming may result in the appearance of an aurora.

If it lasts long enough and stays strong enough, that could mean a New Year's Eve light show for viewers at the right latitudes.

"It's certainly possible," Terry Onsager, a NOAA physicist, told SFGATE. "It depends entirely on the strength of the storm. If it turns out to be stronger than that, it could be seen."

Onsager says viewers in the Pacific Northwest may be in the best position to catch a glimpse of the New Year's Eve aurora.

Auroras are created by the collision of high-energy solar particles with Earth's electromagnetic field. The electric disturbance excites gas ions in the upper atmosphere, causing them to glow various colors. The magnetosphere is thinnest at the poles, allowing the high-energy particles to penetrate into the upper atmosphere more easily. This is why auroras are seen most frequently at extreme latitudes -- aurora borealis, or Northern Lights, in the north, and aurora australis in the south.


Related Links
Solar Science News at SpaceDaily

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
Auroral mystery solved: Sudden bursts caused by swirling charged particles
Kyoto, Japan (SPX) Dec 24, 2015
Auroras are dimly present throughout the night in polar regions, but sometimes these lights explode in brightness. Now Japanese scientists have unlocked the mystery behind this spectacle, known as auroral breakup. For years, scientists have contemplated what triggers the formation of auroral substorms and the sudden bursts of brightness. Appearing in the Journal of Geophysical Research, th ... read more

Russia Postpones Plans on Extensive Moon Exploration Until 2025

Rare full moon on Christmas Day

LADEE Mission Shows Force of Meteoroid Strikes on Lunar Exosphere

XPRIZE verifies moon express launch contract, kicking off new space race

NASA suspends March launch of InSight mission to Mars

Boulders on a Martian Landslide

University researchers test prototype spacesuits at Kennedy

Marshall: Advancing the technology for NASA's Journey to Mars

Astronauts Tour Future White Room, Crew Access Tower

15 in '15: NASA's Commercial Crew Program Moves Closer to Flight

ISRO's year in review 2015

Celebrity chefs create gourmet delights for astronauts

Chinese rover analyzes moon rocks: First new 'ground truth' in 40 years

Agreement with Chinese Space Tech Lab Will Advance Exploration Goals

China launches new communication satellite

China's indigenous SatNav performing well after tests

Space Station Receives New Space Tool to Help Locate Ammonia Leaks

NASA Delivers New Video Experience On ISS

British astronaut dials wrong number on Xmas call from space

Two whacks is all it takes for spacewalk repair

45th Space Wing launches ORBCOMM; historically lands first stage booster

SpaceX rocket landing opens 'new door' to space travel

NASA orders second Boeing Crew Mission to ISS

ESA and Arianespace ink James Webb Space Telescope launch contract

Nearby star hosts closest alien planet in the 'habitable zone'

ALMA reveals planetary construction sites

Monster planet is 'dancing with the stars'

Exoplanets Water Mystery Solved

Port of call at 36,000 KM for in-orbit servicing

Nature's masonry: The first steps in how thin protein sheets form polyhedral shells

Move aside carbon: Boron nitride-reinforced materials are even stronger

Super strong, lightweight metal could build tomorrow's spacecraft

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.