Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
A quantum spin liquid
by Staff Writers
Chestnut Hill, MA (SPX) Oct 26, 2017


Scientists from Boson College and Harvard turned to copper to create a first-of-its-kind iridate - Cu2IrO3 - where the natural magnetic order is disrupted, a state known as geometric frustration.

Researchers from Boston College and Harvard have created an elusive honeycomb-structured material capable of frustrating the magnetic properties within it in order to produce a chemical entity known as "spin liquid," long theorized as a gateway to the free-flowing properties of quantum computing, according to a new report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The first-of-its-kind copper iridate metal oxide - Cu2IrO3 - is one where the natural magnetic order is disrupted, a state known as geometric frustration, said Boston College Assistant Professor of Physics Fazel Tafti, a lead author of the study, titled Cu2IrO3: a new magnetically frustrated honeycomb iridate.

The copper iridate is an insulator - its electrons are immobilized in the solid - but they can still transport a magnetic moment known as "spin". The transport of free spins in the material allows for a flow of quantum information.

The Kitaev model, proposed in 2006 by Cal Tech Professor of Physics Alexei Kitaev, states that a hexagonal honeycomb structure offered a promising route to geometric frustration and therefore, to quantum spin liquid.

Only two honeycomb lattice have been successfully developed in an attempt to fulfill Kitaev's model: a lithium iridate (Li2IrO3) and a sodium iridate (Na2IrO3). Yet both fell short of achieving an ideal spin liquid due to magnetic ordering, said Tafti, who co-authored the paper with Boston College post-doctoral researchers Mykola Abramchuk and Jason W. Krizan, BC Adjunct Professor of Chemistry and Director of Advanced Chemistry Laboratories Kenneth R. Metz, and Harvard's David C. Bell and Cigdem Ozsoy-Keskinbora.

Tafti and his team turned to copper due to its ideal atomic size, which is between lithium and sodium. Their studies in x-ray crystallography found subtle flaws in the honeycombs formed in the lithium and sodium iridates. The team swapped copper for sodium in what Tafti termed a relatively simple "exchange" reaction. The effort produced the first oxide of copper and iridium, Tafti said.

"Copper is ideally suited to the honeycomb structure," said Tafti. "There is almost no distortion in the honeycomb structure."

A decade after the original prediction of quantum spin liquid on a honeycomb lattice by Kitaev, the young team of scientists from Boston College succeeded in making a material that almost exactly corresponds to the Kitaev model, Tafti said.

Tafti's lab will pursue the "exchange" chemistry path to make new forms of honeycomb materials with more exotic magnetic properties, he said.

Researchers from Boston College and Harvard have created an elusive honeycomb-structured material capable of frustrating the magnetic properties within it in order to produce a chemical entity known as "spin liquid," long theorized as a gateway to the free-flowing properties of quantum computing, according to a new report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The first-of-its-kind copper iridate metal oxide - Cu2IrO3 - is one where the natural magnetic order is disrupted, a state known as geometric frustration, said Boston College Assistant Professor of Physics Fazel Tafti, a lead author of the study, titled Cu2IrO3: a new magnetically frustrated honeycomb iridate.

The copper iridate is an insulator - its electrons are immobilized in the solid - but they can still transport a magnetic moment known as "spin". The transport of free spins in the material allows for a flow of quantum information.

The Kitaev model, proposed in 2006 by Cal Tech Professor of Physics Alexei Kitaev, states that a hexagonal honeycomb structure offered a promising route to geometric frustration and therefore, to quantum spin liquid.

Only two honeycomb lattice have been successfully developed in an attempt to fulfill Kitaev's model: a lithium iridate (Li2IrO3) and a sodium iridate (Na2IrO3). Yet both fell short of achieving an ideal spin liquid due to magnetic ordering, said Tafti, who co-authored the paper with Boston College post-doctoral researchers Mykola Abramchuk and Jason W. Krizan, BC Adjunct Professor of Chemistry and Director of Advanced Chemistry Laboratories Kenneth R. Metz, and Harvard's David C. Bell and Cigdem Ozsoy-Keskinbora.

Tafti and his team turned to copper due to its ideal atomic size, which is between lithium and sodium. Their studies in x-ray crystallography found subtle flaws in the honeycombs formed in the lithium and sodium iridates. The team swapped copper for sodium in what Tafti termed a relatively simple "exchange" reaction. The effort produced the first oxide of copper and iridium, Tafti said.

"Copper is ideally suited to the honeycomb structure," said Tafti. "There is almost no distortion in the honeycomb structure."

A decade after the original prediction of quantum spin liquid on a honeycomb lattice by Kitaev, the young team of scientists from Boston College succeeded in making a material that almost exactly corresponds to the Kitaev model, Tafti said.

Tafti's lab will pursue the "exchange" chemistry path to make new forms of honeycomb materials with more exotic magnetic properties, he said.

Research paper

TECH SPACE
Understanding how electrons turn to glass
Sendai, Japan (SPX) Oct 26, 2017
Researchers at Tohoku University have gained new insight into the electronic processes that guide the transformation of liquids into a solid crystalline or glassy state. The ability of some liquids to transition into glass has been exploited since ancient times. But many fundamental aspects of this transition phase are far from understood. Better understanding could spur the development of ... read more

Related Links
Boston College
Space Technology News - Applications and Research


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

TECH SPACE
Plants and psychological well-being in space

Spacewalkers fix robotic arm in time to grab next cargo ship

NASA develops and tests new housing for in-orbit science payloads

Russia's space agency says glitch in manned Soyuz landing

TECH SPACE
NASA awards launch contracts for Landsat 9 and Sentinel-6A

It's a success! Blue Origin conducts first hot-fire test of BE-4 engine

ESA role in Europe's first all-electric telecom satellite

Lockheed Martin Launches Second Cycle of 'Girls' Rocketry Challenge' in Japan

TECH SPACE
Solar eruptions could electrify Martian moons

MAVEN finds Mars has a twisted tail

Mine craft for Mars

Opportunity spends the week imaging Perseverance Valley

TECH SPACE
Space will see Communist loyalty: Chinese astronaut

China launches three satellites

Mars probe to carry 13 types of payload on 2020 mission

UN official commends China's role in space cooperation

TECH SPACE
Myanmar to launch own satellite system-2 in 2019: vice president

Eutelsat's Airbus-built full electric EUTELSAT 172B satellite reaches geostationary orbit

Turkey, Russia to Enhance Cooperation in the Field of Space Technologies

SpaceX launches 10 satellites for Iridium mobile network

TECH SPACE
Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

Selective memory makes data caches 50 percent more efficient

Laser beams for superconductivity

Electrode materials from the microwave oven

TECH SPACE
New NASA study improves search for habitable worlds

From Comets Come Planets

A star that devoured its own planets

Astronomers find potential solution into how planets form

TECH SPACE
Haumea, the most peculiar of Pluto companions, has a ring around it

Ring around a dwarf planet detected

Helicopter test for Jupiter icy moons radar

Solving the Mystery of Pluto's Giant Blades of Ice




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement