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iRobot Awarded US Army Contract For Robotic Systems
by Staff Writers
Bedford MA (SPX) Sep 10, 2008

iRobot PackBot robot.

iRobot has announced it has been awarded a $200 million ceiling priced Indefinite-Delivery/Indefinite-Quantity (IDIQ) contract from the U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation (PEO STRI), on behalf of the Robotic Systems Joint Project Office in Warren, MI.

Under the terms of the contract, the Army could order up to the full $200 million value in military robots, spare parts, training and repair services over the next five years.

This award replaces a previous IDIQ contract that expired in May 2008 and does not limit orders to any particular robots within iRobot's government and industrial line.

Previous IDIQ contracts awarded to the company were specifically for purchases of its iRobot PackBot robots. This contract, however, allows the Army to request additional products and services from iRobot as needed.

"The continued investment from the U.S. Army further validates our robots' critical position in theater, allowing troops to complete missions successfully while keeping them at safe distances," said Joe Dyer, president of iRobot Government and Industrial Robots.

"As the Army continues to utilize ground tactical robots with greater frequency, new applications for these robots are being identified. We are pleased that this contract will allow iRobot to expand our product offering as the Army sees fit, as each of our robots possesses specific capabilities that allow troops to complete a wide range of missions."


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