Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




ENERGY TECH
Will Saudi Arabia Allow the U.S. Oil Boom? Interview with Chris Faulkner
by James Stafford of Oilprice.com
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 12, 2013


File image.

Technology, technology, and more technology-this is what has driven the American oil and gas boom starting in the Bakken and now being played out in the Gulf of Mexico revival, and new advances are coming online constantly. It's enough to rival the Saudis, if the Kingdom allows it to happen. Along with this boom come both promise and fear and a fast-paced regulatory environment that still needs to find the proper balance.

Chris Faulkner: The Bakken Shale has been the biggest driver in America's reversal of decades of decline in oil production. It has transformed North Dakota into an economic powerhouse with the nation's lowest unemployment rate and fastest-growing GDP-and an oil production level surpassing that of some OPEC nations. An added increment of almost 800,000 barrels per day of oil output, built in less than a decade, has helped the US reduce its dependency on oil imports from often hostile countries by 22% since peaking in the mid-2000s.

US oil production is at its highest level since 1992, and in another 5 years, it is projected to reach its highest level since 1972. More importantly, the US oil production surge will help tamp down the possibility of chronically recurring oil supply shortages and help keep a lid on oil price spikes for the foreseeable future. Additionally, the Bakken surge is helping to narrow the spread between WTI and Brent, providing even more economic incentive to develop the costly unconventional resource plays.

James Stafford: The US government recently more than doubled its estimates for Bakken and Three Forks to 7.4 billion barrels of undiscovered and technically recoverable oil and 6.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. How is the industry responding to this? How are investors responding?

Chris Faulkner: Some operators had already been developing the Three Forks formation ahead of the USGS revised estimate for the Greater Bakken play. That drilling in fact provided much of the knowledge about the Three Forks that led to the USGS upgrade. We're already seeing stepped-up drilling in the Three Forks, and some of that will entail dual horizontal laterals, a real milestone that could yield spectacular IP rates. Accordingly, Wall Street analysts are upgrading their guidance on companies such as Continental Resources that are leading the Bakken charge.

James Stafford: What's the next Bakken?

Chris Faulkner: That's a tough one. In a sense, we've already seen it with the Three Forks reappraisal. But it would be exceedingly difficult to replicate the Bakken, with its vast areal extent and thick pays. Progress is being made with a modest level of drilling in the Tuscaloosa Marine Shale of southern Louisiana and Smackover Brown Dense Shale in southern Arkansas/northern Louisiana, but results have been somewhat spotty to date. Perhaps the best prospective candidate is the Cline Shale in the Texas Permian Basin. This shale covers a vast area, has very thick pay zones, and there is established infrastructure. Some estimates have put its technically recoverable resources at 30 billion barrels of oil. But it's very early days in that play. Devon Energy is moving aggressively there, and we should get some hints of its true potential before too long.

James Stafford: How excited should investors be about the Monterrey Shale?

Chris Faulkner: Some restraint is in order. While preliminary estimates put potential Monterey Shale technically recoverable resources at more than 15 billion barrels, it's hardly a slam dunk. There has been a flurry of leasing and some drilling to date, but as of yet no operator has "cracked the code" for the Monterey. Even apart from the substantial technical challenges and complicated geology and petrophysics, a bigger hurdle would be the widespread and entrenched anti-oil development attitudes industry faces in California, which already has the most stringent regulatory regime in the nation. Furthermore, that anti-oil stance will just gain momentum with the anti-frac campaign that the environmental pressure groups are pushing now.

James Stafford: The US government's next auction of Gulf of Mexico acreage is expecting a bigger turnout than previous auctions. How is the bidding environment shaping up ahead of this sale?

Chris Faulkner: Excellent. Even with the near tripling of minimum bid requirements in deepwater areas, I expect brisk bidding. Operators are fine-tuning their exploration strategies in the deepwater areas, and some recent significant discoveries, such as ConocoPhillips's huge Shenandoah find, will only stoke that enthusiasm. I think we're also seeing the beginnings of a revival in shallow Gulf waters, judging from the high number of bids there in the last sale. Expectations of a gas price rebound were underpinned by the latest approval of another LNG export terminal-both positive for shallow-water drilling.

James Stafford: How important are Brazil's pre-salt finds to a revival in the US Gulf of Mexico?

Chris Faulkner: The Gulf revival is proceeding quite nicely as it is with the string of big discoveries in the Inbound Lower Tertiary. However, the knowledge and best practices being accumulated in the pre-salt play off Brazil probably benefits the pre-salt plays emerging off West Africa more so than in the US Gulf, where success has been concentrated more in the subsalt. In fact, the advances gained in probing the Gulf subsalt-particular in seismic technology-laid much of the groundwork for decoding Brazil's pre-salt. I think you'll see the Gulf operators focus more on the Lower Tertiary as the flavor of the day.

James Stafford: How are drilling advancements contributing to a re-evaluation of old data and the collection of new data?

Chris Faulkner: There's no doubt that MWD and LWD [Measurements-while-Drilling/Logging-while-Drilling] have helped operators gain a better perspective on old well logs. As accumulation of drilling data in real time makes even more technical advances, progress will continue. This may be the biggest contributing factor for the dramatic reductions in spud-to-release times that we've seen in the major unconventional plays.

James Stafford: What are the most recent major advancements in seismic imaging and data processing that are changing the way companies decide where to explore and where to drill next?

Chris Faulkner: 3D seismic is firmly established as a valuable exploration tool, especially for delineating reservoirs that have already been identified, and there are intriguing new possibilities for 4D seismic (essentially 3D seismic phases over time), especially for enhanced oil recovery and carbon sequestration applications. But in terms of pure exploration, the linchpin technology has been reverse time migration, which really got the ball rolling for subsalt and pre-salt plays in the Gulf and off Brazil and West Africa. Then explorers started using pre-stack depth migration to ultimately arrive at a fully defined 3D salt geometry, which has fueled much of the success in the Gulf.

James Stafford: What can we expect both from drilling technology and supercomputer data collection and processing over the next 5-10 years?

Chris Faulkner: We'll probably see a growing convergence of microseismic data gathering and processing in real time and real-time drilling data gathering to enhance mapping of natural fractures in tight reservoirs that may help drillers better steer the well so as to optimize subsequent placement of frac stages.

James Stafford: Can the US really compete with Saudi Arabia in terms of production?

Chris Faulkner: Sure, just as long as the Saudis will allow it. Don't forget the Kingdom is still the world's swing supplier, a role it's held since the late 1970s. It's important to remember that the Saudis not only have the largest proved reserves of oil, it's also the largest repository-by far-of low-cost oil reserves. Much of Canada's oil sands and US tight oil requires $75 per barrel or more to be economically viable. Saudi Arabia also needs $75 per barrel, but that's to support its current domestic budget. The Kingdom's lifting costs are somewhere around $5 at last report. So Saudi Arabia could easily flood the market, as it did in the early '80s, if it lost too much market share, dropping oil prices to $50 or less, and US drilling and production would collapse. Ideally, growing demand from China and other Asian markets will help sustain Saudi production levels and oil prices even as the Americas become self-sufficient in oil.

James Stafford: Can we expect to see a gradual end to fossil fuel subsidies in the near or medium-term?

Chris Faulkner: Depends on what you mean by subsidy. Anti-oil factions erroneously claim that the standard tax incentives that the US oil and gas industry shares with most other American businesses are subsidies. But while these incentives are the target of some heated rhetoric, there are enough red-state Democrats in Congress to prevent them from being stripped away, especially for the independent oil companies that rely most heavily on them. A more likely development in the US would be incremental attempts to impose a "back door" carbon tax by proxy-essentially the Obama administration resorting to regulatory overreach to add to the costs of fossil fuel development, production, and consumption. This kind of disincentive essentially creates a subsidy-in-reverse.

James Stafford: Who benefits most from these subsidies and how?

Chris Faulkner: Again, if you mean standard industry tax breaks such as expensing of intangible drilling costs, expanded amortization for G and G costs, repealing the percentage depletion allowance benefit, pure-play E and P independents rely on them more heavily than integrated firms such as the majors or hybrid midstream/upstream firms. I've seen estimates that eliminating these incentives could slash as much as 15-20% of US drilling. But if you mean true subsidies such as those in Iran or Venezuela aimed at keeping gasoline and other fuel costs to consumers below their real costs, then the primary beneficiaries are the autocrats and dictators who might get ousted without them.

James Stafford: Is natural gas a feasible bridge to the US' renewable energy future, and will the Obama administration's plan to fund clean energy projects with oil and gas revenues work?

Chris Faulkner: Absolutely yes and absolutely no, respectively. The fact that US greenhouse emissions have fallen in recent years owing mainly to power plants switching from coal to low-cost natural gas illustrates the first point quite clearly. The fact that US LNG export projects are moving ahead underscores the point that there are abundant gas resources to support that bridge.

As to the second point, one word: Solyndra. How do you think Americans will react to their energy bills spiking so that more of their tax dollars can be flung down that rat hole? How reticent do you think the Republicans will be about pointing that out?

James Stafford: How important is Keystone XL to the US' energy future?

Chris Faulkner: Keystone XL is important for several reasons. First, blocking the project will alienate our most important energy trading partner, Canada. Some folks talk about US energy self-sufficiency, but for oil that is a much taller hurdle; however, North American oil self-sufficiency could be achieved in less than a decade. Who knows how Canada will react to such a snub and an apparent violation of NAFTA? Retaliatory measures in energy trade are not out of the realm of possibility. The irony is that Canadian oil sands syncrude, bitumen, and heavy oil will continue to move south irrespective of Keystone XL's fate, so any purported environmental benefits from stopping the project are a wash. And Gulf Coast refiners are eager to replace declining supplies of heavy crude from Mexico and Venezuela (not to mention the reliability of the latter's supplies) with low-gravity feedstock from a friendly North American supplier whose supply will only increase.

Perhaps the most important impact of blocking Keystone XL is symbolic. If the administration caves to the environmental pressure lobby, it sends an unmistakable message to both sides; the result will be a perception of significantly heightened investment risk in the US oil sector and an emboldened opposition that will use the momentum of this "victory" (certainly a pyrrhic one for America) to step up opposition to oil and gas development everywhere in North America. Don't forget: A hostile administration beset by a sluggish economy imposed the windfall profits tax that resulted in the migration of hundreds of billions of dollars of US oil and gas company E and P capex overseas; this was the single biggest factor in the US oil production decline of the past several decades. A regulatory stranglehold can have the same effect.

James Stafford: What can we expect in the next 1-2 years in terms of advanced fracking technology that could help remove some of the opposition to the process?

Chris Faulkner: The use of benign frac fluid constituents taken from food sources is certainly a significant advance and at least shows industry is trying to address the public's concerns. Breitling Oil and Gas' EnviroFrac program was founded in February 2010 to evaluate the types of additives typically used in the process of hydraulic fracturing to determine their environmental friendliness. After evaluations are completed, EnviroFrac calls for the elimination of any additive not critical to the successful completion of the well and determines if greener alternatives are available for all essential additives. EnviroFrac is a decisive move toward an even greener fluid system. By reviewing all of the ingredients used in each frac, the program identifies chemicals that can be removed and tests alternatives for remaining additives. To date, the company has eliminated 25% of the additives used in frac fluids in most of its shale plays.

But the truth of the matter is that the science and data have always been on industry's side in this debate. So technology is less of a consideration in removing opposition than are efforts to educate the public about the science and data.

.


Related Links
More about Chris and Breitlings operations
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ENERGY TECH
Shale resources add 47% to global gas reserves: US EIA
New York (AFP) June 11, 2013
Shale-based resources increase the world's total potential oil reserves by 11 percent and natural gas by 47 percent, according to a US report released Monday. In an initial assessment of shale oil resources and an update of shale gas reserves, the US Energy Information Agency said shale deposits could add 345 billion barrels of oil to global reserves, increasing the total to 3,357 billion ba ... read more


ENERGY TECH
LADEE Arrives at Wallops for Moon Mission

NASA's GRAIL Mission Solves Mystery of Moon's Surface Gravity

Moon dust samples missing for 40 years found in Calif. warehouse

Unusual minerals in moon craters may have been delivered from space

ENERGY TECH
Mars Rover Opportunity Trekking Toward More Layers

SciTechTalk: Mars rover readies for 'road trip' on the Red Planet

First woman in space ready for 'one-way flight to Mars'

Aging Mars rover makes new water discoveries

ENERGY TECH
The Body Electric: Researchers Move Closer to Low-Cost, Implantable Electronics

TED conference sets stage for a week of bright ideas

NASA's Orion Spacecraft Proves Sound Under Pressure

Expert slams Congress over ban on U.S.-China space cooperation

ENERGY TECH
China to send second woman into space: officials

Tiangong-1 ready for docking and entry

Shenzhou-10 mission to teach students in orbit

China to host international seminar on manned spaceflight

ENERGY TECH
Star Canadian spaceman Chris Hadfield retiring

Experiments, Spacewalk Preps and Maintenance for Crew

International trio takes shortcut to space station

Science and Maintenance for Station Crew, New Crew Members Prep for Launch

ENERGY TECH
Mitsubishi Heavy and Arianespace conclude MOU on commercial launches

Sea Launch IS-27 FROB Report Complete

Europe launches record cargo for space station

New chief urges Ariane 5 modification for big satellites

ENERGY TECH
Kepler Stars and Planets are Bigger than Previously Thought

Astronomers gear up to discover Earth-like planets

Stars Don't Obliterate Their Planets (Very Often)

'Dust trap' around distant star may solve planet formation mystery

ENERGY TECH
Sony eyes long game despite console launch triumph

Two New Russian Radars to Start Work Next Year

Sony wins opening skirmish in new-gen console war

Study: Moving business software to cloud promises big energy savings




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement