Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




ICE WORLD
Top Officials Meet at ONR as Arctic Changes Quicken
by David Smalley, Office of Naval Research
Arlington, VA (SPX) Dec 18, 2012


File image.

The Navy's chief of naval research, Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, met this week with leaders from U.S. and Canadian government agencies to address research efforts in the Arctic, in response to dramatic and accelerating changes in summer sea ice coverage.

"Our Sailors and Marines need to have a full understanding of the dynamic Arctic environment, which will be critical to protecting and maintaining our national, economic and security interests," said Klunder.

"Our research will allow us to know what's happening, to predict what is likely to come for the region, and give leadership the information it needs to formulate the best policies and plans for future Arctic operations."

The Arctic Summit, held Dec. 11 at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) headquarters in Arlington, enabled senior leaders from ONR, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Defense Research and Development Canada, the Departments of Energy and Interior, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Science Foundation, the Navy Task Force Climate Change and more to share important scientific ideas on the region.

One of the goals of the summit was to assess the different Arctic research efforts-and potentially form new research partnerships.

"Vital and varied Arctic research is taking place across a number of agencies," Klunder said. "We are identifying areas of common scientific interest-and ideally come up with a comprehensive mutual understanding of everyone's current and planned efforts."

In the wake of last week's widely reported release of NOAA's Arctic Report Card-co-edited by ONR program officer and Arctic science expert Dr. Martin Jeffries-new concerns have arisen over record-low levels of sea ice and snow in the Arctic.

"We are surely on the verge of seeing a new Arctic," said Jeffries. "And, since the Arctic is not isolated from the global environmental system-indeed it is an integral and vital part of that system-we can expect to see Arctic change have global environmental and socio-economic consequences."

While yesterday's summit was not a policy meeting, experts agree that changes in the Arctic could raise substantial future strategy questions.

The U.S. Navy Arctic Roadmap, authored by the Navy's Task Force Climate Change, notes that: "Because the Arctic is primarily a maritime environment, the Navy must consider the changing Arctic in developing future policy, strategy, force structure and investment."

Changing Arctic conditions are opening the region to more human enterprise that could impact naval operations, including:

+ Oil, mineral and other natural resource extraction
+ Shipping
+ Commercial fishing + Tourism
+ Scientific research

If, as Klunder hopes, new research partnerships develop from meetings like the one held this week at ONR, it could result in a powerful planning tool for military and civilian officials alike.

"We know that the key to a successful path forward for all parties and nations concerned depends on the ability to plan ahead," said Klunder. "And for that, we are utilizing top-flight research from leading scientists around the globe.

"We'll keep working together to fully understand this changing Arctic."

.


Related Links
Office of Naval Research
Beyond the Ice Age






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ICE WORLD
Greenland ice sheet carries evidence of increased atmospheric acidity
Seattle WA (SPX) Dec 13, 2012
Research has shown a decrease in levels of the isotope nitrogen-15 in core samples from Greenland ice starting around the time of the Industrial Revolution. The decrease has been attributed to a corresponding increase in nitrates associated with the burning of fossil fuels. However, new University of Washington research suggests that the decline in nitrogen-15 is more directly related to i ... read more


ICE WORLD
GRAIL Lunar Impact Site Named for Astronaut Sally Ride

NASA probes crash into the moon

No plans of sending an Indian on moon

Rocket Burn Sets Stage for Dynamic Moon Duos' Lunar Impact

ICE WORLD
Curious About Life: Interview with Darby Dyer

Opportunity Checking Out Some Rocks At Matijevic Hill

Curiosity Rover Nearing Yellowknife Bay

Charitum Montes: a cratered winter wonderland

ICE WORLD
NASA Progressing Toward First Launch of Orion Spacecraft

New member of the exclusive space club

NASA Awards Commercial Crew Certification Contracts

China patent office becomes world's largest: WIPO

ICE WORLD
Mr Xi in Space

China plans manned space launch in 2013: state media

China to launch manned spacecraft

Tiangong 1 Parked And Waiting As Shenzhou 10 Mission Prep Continues

ICE WORLD
Medical Ops, Fan Checks for Space Crew; New Trio Checks Soyuz

Khrunichev Completes Nauka Space Station Module

New Crew of ISS to Perform Two Spacewalks

Space Station to reposition for science

ICE WORLD
Arctic town eyes future as Europe's gateway to space

ISRO planning 10 space missions in 2013

Russia works to fix satellite's off-target orbit

ULA Launch Monopoly to End

ICE WORLD
Astronomers discover and 'weigh' infant solar system

Search for Life Suggests Solar Systems More Habitable than Ours

Do missing Jupiters mean massive comet belts?

Brown Dwarfs May Grow Rocky Planets

ICE WORLD
Samsung is top 2012 phone brand, ousting Nokia

Instagram yields to user outrage over policy change

Rice uses light to remotely trigger biochemical reactions

Apple losses bid for US ban on Samsung smartphones




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement