Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .

The future of holographic video
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Feb 17, 2015

This is a waveguide device for a holographic video monitor under construction at BYU. Image courtesy D.Smalley/BYU.

Holographic video displays, featuring three-dimensional images, are about to "go large" and become a lot more affordable at the same time, thanks to the work of a team of Brigham Young University (BYU) researchers and their collaborators at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

It's all about manipulating light. Three of the primary methods include: reflection, refraction and diffraction. In this case, diffraction is the key, and essentially enables lines - almost any type - to bend and filter light.

In the journal Review of Scientific Instruments, from AIP Publishing, the team reports using surface acoustic waves as a dynamic pattern of lines to control light's angle and color composition.

How does it work? The magic happens on the surface of a special crystal called lithium niobate (LiNbO3), which boasts excellent optical properties. Beneath the surface of the LiNbO3, microscopic channels, or "waveguides," are created to confine light passing through. A metal electrode is then deposited onto each waveguide, which can produce surface acoustic waves.

The resulting frequency division of color enables a new type of color display. This means that "for a wavelength display, we don't need to rely on color filter wheels or dedicated red and blue pixels," explained Daniel E. Smalley, assistant professor of electrical engineering at BYU, who first reported an advance in this realm in Nature in 2013, while he was a graduate student working at MIT with his advisor V. Michael Bove.

Instead of a color wheel, any color combination is possible with their approach simply by altering the frequency of the signal sent to the "white waveguide pixel." In other words, Smalley said, "we can color the output of our display by 'coloring' the frequencies of the drive signal."

"As a bonus, this interaction also rotates the polarization of the signal light so that we can use a polarizer to eliminate any noise in the system," he added.

In terms of applications, the team's technology adapts and combines techniques from telecom and integrated optics in a way that makes it much less expensive than previous approaches.

"We can use this technology to make simple and inexpensive color waveguide displays - including inexpensive holographic video displays," Smalley pointed out. "This can drop the cost of a holographic video display from tens of thousands of dollars to less than a thousand."

Holograms are meant to be large. Now that there's a simple and inexpensive color display technology, Smalley and colleagues are working on ways to use it to create large holographic video displays - on the scale of room-sized displays.


Related Links
American Institute of Physics
Satellite-based Internet technologies

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Researchers unveil contact lenses with zoom capabilities
San Jose, Calif. (UPI) Feb 13, 2015
A group of researchers at the American Association of the Advancement of Science conference on Friday unveiled a working contact lens prototype with a built-in zoom feature. The contact lens is really two lenses in one - one lens for seeing the world as it is, another to magnify one's surroundings by a factor of three. A single wink (the blink of one eye), will trigger the switch back ... read more

Application of laser microprobe technology to Apollo samples refines lunar impact history

NASA releases video of the far side of the Moon

US Issuing Licenses for Mineral Mining on Moon

LRO finds lunar hydrogen more abundant on Moon's pole-facing slopes

Scientists fail to explain strange plumes spotted on Martian surface

NASA's Curiosity Analyzing Sample of Martian Mountain

Mars Rover Nearing Marathon Achievement

NASA's Curiosity Analyzing Sample of Martian Mountain

London workshop teaches nuts and bolts behind tech

Critical NASA Science Returns to Earth aboard SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft

45th Space Wing, SpaceX sign first-ever landing pad agreement at the Cape

Russian research team explores vision complications for astronauts

More Astronauts for China

China launches the FY-2 08 meteorological satellite successfully

China's Long March puts satellite in orbit on 200th launch

Countdown to China's new space programs begins

Europe destroys last space truck to ISS

NASA, Space Station Partners Announce Future Mission Crew Members

Camera to record doomed ATV's disintegration - from inside

ATV to bid farewell to Space Station for last time

Soyuz Installed at Baikonur, Expected to Launch Wednesday

SpaceX launches deep-space weather observatory

SpaceX cargo craft returns to Earth

High seas force SpaceX to ditch bid to recycle rocket

Scientists predict earth-like planets around most stars

"Vulcan Planets" - Inside-Out Formation of Super-Earths

Dawn ahead!

Habitable Evaporated Cores

3-D printing with custom molecules creates low-cost mechanical sensor

See here now: Telescopic contact lenses and wink-control glasses

Getting in shape

Google, Mattel bring virtual reality to iconic toy

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.