Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Temperatures to rise 0.3-4.8 C this century: UN panel
by Staff Writers
Stockholm (AFP) Sept 27, 2013


A UN panel said Friday it was more certain than ever that humans were causing global warming and predicted temperatures would rise by 0.3 to 4.8 degrees Celsius (0.5-8.6 degrees Fahrenheit) this century.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) also projected sea levels would rise by between 26 and 82 centimetres (10.4 and 32.8 inches) by 2100, according to a summary of the first volume in a long-awaited review.

The Nobel-winning group said it was "extremely likely" -- a term meaning it was 95-percent convinced -- that humans caused more than half of the warming observed over the past 60 years.

In its last report in 2007, the panel had rated its conviction at 90 percent.

The new document is the first volume in a trilogy that will seek to summarise the status of global warming and its impacts.

The IPCC has delivered four previous assessment reports in its 25-year history.

Each edition has pounded out an ever-louder drumbeat to warn that temperatures are rising and the risk to the climate system -- in drought, floods, storms and rising seas -- is accentuating.

The panel's projections for 2100 are based on computer models of trends in heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions, especially from coal, oil and gas, which provide the backbone of energy supply today.

The most optimistic of four scenarios for warming sees an average temperature rise of 1.0 C (1.8 F) by 2100 over 2000 levels, ranging from 0.3 to 1.7 C (0.5-3.1 F). This is the only scenario that can safely meet a UN target of 2 C (3.6 F) which also factors in warming from the start of the Industrial Revolution to 2000.

By comparison, the highest IPCC scenario has an average additional warming this century of 3.7 C (6.7 F), ranging from 2.6 C (4.7 F) to a 4.8 C (8.6 F) -- a figure that many experts consider catastrophic.

"Global surface temperature change for the 21st century is projected to be likely to exceed 1.5 C relative to 1850-1900 in all but the lowest scenario considered," said Thomas Stocker, co-chairman of the IPCC working group that authored the report.

He warned: "Limiting climate change will require substantial and sustained reductions of greenhouse-gas emissions."

'Unbiased assessments' of climate change

Stocker said there would be an impact on the risk for heatwaves, floods and drought.

"Heatwaves are very likely to occur more frequently and last longer. As the Earth warms, we expect to see currently wet regions receiving more rainfall, and dry regions receiving less, although there will be exceptions," he said.

The work released in Stockholm comprises a 2,000-page report authored by 257 scientists, plus a 36-page Summary for Policymakers.

Two more volumes will be released next year, touching on the impacts from climate change and options for dealing with the problem, followed by a synthesis of all three.

In the past, the massive overviews delivered a jolt to the troubled negotiations for a UN pact on curbing greenhouse gas emissions, and initiated grassroots campaigns on climate change in many countries.

In a video statement at a close-of-meeting press conference, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon praised the IPCC -- targeted by climate sceptics as biased or flawed -- for delivering "regular, unbiased assessments of the mounting impacts of a warming planet."

"This new report will be essential for governments as they work to finalize an ambitious, legal agreement on climate change in 2015," he said.

Ban recalled his plan to convene a climate summit in September 2014 "to generate the political commitment to keep global temperature rise below the agreed two-degree Celsius threshold."

Political interest in dealing with climate change fell back after a nearly disastrous UN summit in Copenhagen in 2009, and willingness for concessions has fallen back in developed countries still struggling with the 2008 financial crisis.

.


Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
UN panel in final push for new climate report
Stockholm (AFP) Sept 26, 2013
Scientists and governments pored over the summary Thursday of an eagerly awaited UN report expected to emphasise the escalating threat from climate change. To be released in Stockholm on Friday, it will be the Nobel-winning panel's first overview since 2007 of the scientific evidence for climate change. A draft of the summary seen by AFP declares with the greatest emphasis to date that c ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
Mission to moon will boost research and awareness

Mighty Eagle Improves Autonomous Landing Software With Successful Flight

Watch Out for the Harvest Moon

Chang'e-3 lunar probe sent to launch site

CLIMATE SCIENCE
First scoop of Mars soil contains 2 percent water: study

NASA Rover Inspects Pebbly Rocks at Martian Waypoint

Martian Life: Good or Bad?

Communications Tests Go the Distance for MAVEN

CLIMATE SCIENCE
"GRAVITY" is Almost Here

International Partnership Releases Space Exploration Benefits Paper

Iran to send second monkey into space

Voyager's departure from the heliosphere

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Chinese VP stresses peaceful use of space

China's space station to open for foreign peers

Last Days for Tiangong

China civilian technology satellites put into use

CLIMATE SCIENCE
New space crew joins ISS on Olympic torch mission

Station Crew Readies for Cygnus' Sunday Arrival

American, two Russians take shortcut to space

Tech glitch delays space station berthing to Saturday

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Arianespace and Astrium sign deal to begin production of 18 new Ariane 5 vehicles

Problems with Proton booster fixed

Decontamination continues at Baikonur after Proton abortive launc

Russia launches three communication satellites

CLIMATE SCIENCE
How Engineers Revamped Spitzer to Probe Exoplanets

ESA selects SSTL to design Exoplanet satellite mission

Coldest Brown Dwarfs Blur Lines between Stars and Planets

NASA-funded Program Helps Amateur Astronomers Detect Alien Worlds

CLIMATE SCIENCE
NGC Completes Safety of Flight Testing on Common Infrared Countermeasure System

Green photon beams more agile than optical tweezers

Space oddity: the mystery of 2013 QW1

Domain walls as new information storage medium




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement