Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




SOLAR SCIENCE
Solar tsunami used to measure Sun's magnetic field
by Staff Writers
Los Angeles CA (SPX) Jul 17, 2013


File image.

A solar tsunami observed by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Japanese Hinode spacecraft has been used to provide the first accurate estimates of the Sun's magnetic field. Solar tsunamis are produced by enormous explosions in the Sun's atmosphere called coronal mass ejections (CMEs).

As the CME travels out into space, the tsunami travels across the Sun at speeds of up to 1000 kilometres per second.

Similar to tsunamis on Earth, the shape of solar tsunamis is changed by the environment through which they move. Just as sound travels faster in water than in air, solar tsunamis have a higher speed in regions of stronger magnetic field.

This unique feature allowed the team, led by researchers from UCL's Mullard Space Science Laboratory, to measure the Sun's magnetic field. The results are outlined in a paper soon to be published in the journal Solar Physics.

Dr David Long, UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory, and lead author of the research, said: "We've demonstrated that the Sun's atmosphere has a magnetic field about ten times weaker than a normal fridge magnet."

Using data obtained using the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), a UK-led instrument on the Japanese Hinode spacecraft, the team measured the density of the solar atmosphere through which the tsunami was travelling.

The combination of imaging and spectral observations provides a rare opportunity to examine the magnetic field which permeates the Sun's atmosphere.

Dr Long noted: "These are rare observations of a spectacular event that reveal some really interesting details about our nearest star."

Visible as loops and other structures in the Sun's atmosphere, the Sun's magnetic field is difficult to measure directly and usually has to be estimated using intensive computer simulations. The Hinode spacecraft has three highly sensitive telescopes, which use visible, X-ray and ultraviolet light to examine both slow and rapid changes in the magnetic field.

The instruments on Hinode act like a microscope to track how the magnetic field around sunspots is generated, shapes itself, and then fades away. These results show just how sensitive these instruments can be, measuring magnetic fields that were previously thought too weak to detect.

The explosions that produce solar tsunamis can send CMEs hurtling towards the Earth. Although protected by its own magnetic field, the Earth is vulnerable to these solar storms as they can adversely affect satellites and technological infrastructure.

Dr Long said: "As our dependency on technology increases, understanding how these eruptions occur and travel will greatly assist in protecting against solar activity."

.


Related Links
Solar Dynamics Observatory
UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory
Solar Science News at SpaceDaily






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





SOLAR SCIENCE
Scientists track solar 'tsunami' to measure sun's magnetic field
London (UPI) Jul 11, 2013
British astrophysicists report they've used a solar "tsunami" observed by U.S. and Japanese spacecraft to measure the sun's magnetic field. Solar tsunamis such as the one observed by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Japanese Hinode spacecraft are produced by enormous explosions in the sun's atmosphere called coronal mass ejections that spew masses of particles into space while ... read more


SOLAR SCIENCE
Soviet Moon rover moved farther than thought

Scientist says Earth may once have been orbited by two moons

Dust hazard for Moon missions: scientists

NASA Seeks Information on Commercial Robotic Lunar Lander Capabilities

SOLAR SCIENCE
New Mars mission: in the Vikings' steps

Overhead View of Mars Rover 10 Years After Launch

Third Drive of Curiosity's Long Trek Covers 135 Feet

DNA-sequencing chip could be sent to Mars to search for signs of life

SOLAR SCIENCE
The Zero Gravity Coffee Cup

Outside View: Future science fiction

New Flight Projects Building Boasts First NASA Goddard 'Green' Roof

Technology Could Curtail Astronaut Conflict

SOLAR SCIENCE
Medical quarantine over for Shenzhou-10 astronauts

China's astronauts ready for longer missions

Chinese probe reaches record height in space travel

China's space tracking ship Yuanwang-5 berths at Jakarta for replenishment

SOLAR SCIENCE
Space Station ARISS Software Upgraded by Student For Students

Astronaut's helmet leak forces abrupt end to spacewalk

NASA puzzled as astronaut's helmet leak halts spacewalk

Luca, the orbital repair man

SOLAR SCIENCE
Alphasat stacks up

ESA Signs Off On Baseline Configuration Of Ariane 6

Alphasat and INSAT 3D fueled for Ariane 5 heavy lift dual launch

Special group to be set up for inspecting production of Proton-M carrier rockets

SOLAR SCIENCE
UM Researchers Land NASA Grant to Search Space for Exoplanets

Disks Don't Need Planets to Make Patterns

Hubble Finds a Cobalt Blue Planet

Gaps in dust around stars may not indicate planets as many believe

SOLAR SCIENCE
Homemade 3D guns in US stir more buzz than bang

ASC Signal Doubles Mission Capabilities Across Its Satellite Antenna Line

Raytheon touts company developments

Surface porosity and wettability are key factors in boiling heat transfer




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement