Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




ECLIPSES
Solar Eclipse to Sweep Across Australia, Pacific Islands
by Staff Writers
Boston MA (SPX) May 01, 2013


The annular phase will start in extreme northwest Australia in the state of Western Australia, where some veteran eclipse chasers will try to see it at sunrise.

An annular eclipse of the Sun, when a ring of everyday Sun remains around the Moon's silhouette, will sweep across the Australian outback and into the Pacific Ocean on the morning of May 10, local time.

Though about 95% of the solar disk will be covered, the remaining 5% of Sun will be so bright that the darkening of the sky would hardly be noticeable except to those watching through specially filtered glasses. Unlike the case for the recent total eclipse, the special filters must be used throughout the entire event.

Prof. Jay Pasachoff of Williams College in Massachusetts, USA, the Chair of the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Eclipses, will be viewing his 56th solar eclipse.

"Solar eclipses can be inspirational to students and others, so it is interesting to have everyone view the eclipse, but only safe methods of viewing should be used," he cautions. Pasachoff is traveling with Melissa Hulbert of Sydney Observatory and others to the vicinity of Tennant Creek for the event. The event there will occur for a few minutes shortly after 8 a.m. local time.

The rest of Australia will see a partial solar eclipse. During the partial phases or annularity, the remaining solar disk is too bright to look at safely, unless you are looking through specially filtered glasses that knock out 99.999% of the sunlight. Accidental projection of a partly eclipsed Sun should be visible on pavement or building walls in what is known as pinhole projection, with the small hole usually formed from small spaces between the leaves of trees.

Binoculars can be used safely only if they are used to project an image down on the ground or across on a wall, given the low angle of the Sun; it is hazardous to look at the Sun through binoculars unless they are properly filtered.

The annular phase will start in extreme northwest Australia in the state of Western Australia, where some veteran eclipse chasers will try to see it at sunrise.

The 300-km-wide path will include Tennant Creek, about 500 km north of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory. The path of annularity will leave the Australian continent well north of Cairns, where tens of thousands of people saw a total solar eclipse in November, and even north of Cooktown; Cliff Island and Flinders Group National Parks will be in the zone.

Annularity will last about 3 minutes at Tennant Creek and about 4-1/2 minutes at the centerline, about 50 km north of Tennant Creek. The path of annularity will leave Queensland with about 4-3/4 minutes of annularity.

While traversing the Pacific, the path of annularity will include the Hula peninsula of Papua New Guinea, where Pasachoff saw the 1984 total solar eclipse, and the northwestern Solomon Islands. The peak duration of the eclipse will be slightly east of the Tarawa (Kiribati) islands, with about 6 minutes of annularity.

Weather permitting, everyone in Australia, except for the western third of Western Australia, would be able to see a partial eclipse. The Sun's diameter will be 36% covered in Melbourne at about 8:50 a.m. local time, 38% covered in Canberra, 39% covered in Sydney at about 8:55 a.m. local time, and 52% covered in Brisbane. Partial phases will also be visible in the southern Philippines, in eastern Indonesia, in Papua New Guinea, and in the northeastern part of New Zealand's south island and all of its north island, though with only 8% coverage in Auckland.

Also within the zone of partial phases are the entire Hawaiian Islands, with 44% of the solar diameter covered in Honolulu at maximum. The northeastern limit of the partial eclipse occurs just off the western coast of Baja California.

The next total eclipse of the Sun will cross mid-northern Africa on November 3.

.


Related Links
Eclipses.Info
Solar and Lunar Eclipses at Skynightly






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ECLIPSES
The syzygy season of 2012
Melbourne, Australia (SPX) Jan 08, 2013
The end of the world - mis-predicted from the Mayan calendar for December 2012 - failed to live up to expectations, but the year was still a memorable one for celestial alignments. In this one year we had the last Transit of Venus most of us will ever see, a total solar eclipse, an annular solar eclipse, and two lunar eclipses. All this action on the line between the earth and the su ... read more


ECLIPSES
Characterizing The Lunar Radiation Environment

Russia rekindles Moon exploration program, intends setting up first human outposts there

Pre-existing mineralogy may survive lunar impacts

Lunar cycle determines hunting behaviour of nocturnal gulls

ECLIPSES
Dutch reality show seeks one-way astronauts for Mars

Accurate pointing by Curiosity

NASA Mars Orbiter Images May Show 1971 Soviet Lander

Opportunity is in position for solar conjunction at 'Cape York' on the rim of Endeavour Crater

ECLIPSES
NASA's Chief Defends Commercial Spaceflight Agreements

NASA Invites the Public to Fly Along with Voyager

Google's Brin keeps spotlight on future technologies

Mysterious water on Jupiter came from comet smash

ECLIPSES
Yuanwang III, VI depart for space-tracking missions

Shenzhou's Shadow Crew

Shenzhou 10 sent to launch site

China's Next Women Astronauts

ECLIPSES
NASA Extends Crew Flight Contract with Russian Space Agency

Cargo spaceship docks with ISS despite antenna mishap

ISS Communications Test Bed Checks Out; Experiments Begin

Spacewalkers Deploy Plasma Experiment, Install Navigational Aid

ECLIPSES
O3b Networks' first four satellites arrive for the next Arianespace Soyuz launch

On the record with... Stephane Israel, Arianespace Chairman and CEO

Vega's three-satellite payload is integrated and ready for launch

NASA Seeks Innovative Suborbital Flight Technology Proposals

ECLIPSES
Astronomer studies far-off worlds through 'characterization by proxy'

Mysterious Hot Spots Observed In A Cool Red Supergiant

Orbital Selected By NASA for TESS Astrophysics Satellite

Star-and Planet-Forming Regions May Hold Key to Life's Chirality

ECLIPSES
NASA, Air Force Seek Next Generation Space Processor Program

The Day NASA's Fermi Dodged a 1.5-ton Bullet

Snap-proof space tether

NASA, Partners Solicit Creative Materials Manufacturing Solutions




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement