Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




ROBO SPACE
Silver Nanowire Sensors Hold Promise for Prosthetics, Robotics
by Staff Writers
Raleigh NC (SPX) Jan 21, 2014


A sensor based on silver nanowires is mounted onto a thumb joint to monitor the skin strain associated with thumb flexing. The sensor shows good wearability and large-strain sensing capability. Image courtesy Shanshan Yao.

North Carolina State University researchers have used silver nanowires to develop wearable, multifunctional sensors that could be used in biomedical, military or athletic applications, including new prosthetics, robotic systems and flexible touch panels. The sensors can measure strain, pressure, human touch and bioelectronic signals such as electrocardiograms.

"The technology is based on either physical deformation or "fringing" electric field changes. The latter is very similar to the mechanism used in smartphone touch screens, but the sensors we've developed are stretchable and can be mounted on a variety of curvilinear surfaces such as human skin," says Shanshan Yao, a Ph.D. student at NC State and lead author of a paper on the work.

"These sensors could be used to help develop prosthetics that respond to a user's movement and provide feedback when in use," says Dr. Yong Zhu, an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NC State and senior author of the paper.

"They could also be used to create robotics that can 'feel' their environment, or the sensors could be incorporated into clothing to track motion or monitor an individual's physical health."

The researchers built on Zhu's earlier work to create highly conductive and elastic conductors made from silver nanowires. Specifically, the researchers sandwiched an insulating material between two of the stretchable conductors.

The two layers then have the ability - called "capacitance" - to store electric charges. Pushing, pulling or touching the stretchable conductors changes the capacitance. The sensors work by measuring that change in capacitance.

"Creating these sensors is simple and low cost," Yao says. "And we've already demonstrated the sensors in several prototype applications."

For example, the researchers employed these sensors to monitor thumb movement, which can be useful in controlling robotic or prosthetic devices. The researchers also demonstrated an application to monitor knee movements while a test subject is running, walking and jumping.

"The deformation involved in these movements is large, and would break a lot of other sensor devices," Zhu says. "But our sensors can be stretched to 150 percent or more of their original length without losing functionality, so they can handle it."

The researchers also developed an array of sensors that can map pressure distribution, which is important for use in robotics and prosthetics applications. The sensors exhibit a quick response time - 40 milliseconds - so strain and pressure can be monitored in real time.

The paper, "Wearable Multifunctional Sensors Using Printed Stretchable Conductors Made Of Silver Nanowires," is published online in the journal Nanoscale. The work was supported by the National Science Foundation through NC State's ASSIST Engineering Research Center.

"Wearable Multifunctional Sensors Using Printed Stretchable Conductors Made Of Silver Nanowires"; Authors: Shanshan Yao and Yong Zhu, North Carolina State University; Published: Online Jan. 14, Nanoscale; DOI: 10.1039/C3NR05496A

.


Related Links
North Carolina State University
All about the robots on Earth and beyond!






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





UAV Payloads 2014, 24 - 25 June - London, UK
ROBO SPACE
Ladies And Gentlemen, Boot Your Robots!
Pasadena CA (JPL) Jan 21, 2014
Miami Speedway in Homestead, Fla., was the place to be late last month for an unusual two-day competition: the DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials. But if you went expecting high-octane cars zooming around the track at blazing speed, you might have been disappointed. The 16 robots participating in the challenge moved more like the tortoise than the hare, as they performed such tasks as opening ... read more


ROBO SPACE
NASA Seeks Partnership Opportunities For Commercial Lunar Landers

Chang'e-3 probe sets out on new missions

China's lunar probe observes stars, explores moon

China's moon rover performs first lunar probe

ROBO SPACE
Mystery Mars rock reveals unexpected chemical composition

Mysterious stone 'rawled up' to Mars Rover Opportunity

Oppy Encounters A Surprise At Solander Point

Dutch researcher says Earth food plants able to grow on Mars

ROBO SPACE
At Your Service: Orion Service Module Complete

Lawrence Livermore 'space cops' to help control traffic in space

NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to be Renamed for Neil Armstrong

NASA Tests Orion Spacecraft Parachute Jettison over Arizona

ROBO SPACE
Extra Time for Tiangong

Official: China's space policy open to world

China launches communications satellite for Bolivia

China's moon rover continues lunar survey after photographing lander

ROBO SPACE
Cygnus Work Under Way, Normal Station Operations Continue

Spaceflight, Nanoracks Partnership Launch CubeSat Customers Towards Historic ISS Deployment

Orbital's cargo ship arrives at space station

Obama Administration Extends ISS Until at Least 2024

ROBO SPACE
Turkish Telecoms Satellite to Launch From Baikonur Feb. 15

Russia's Soyuz Rocket to Get Video Cameras

NASA Commercial Crew Partner SpaceX Tests Dragon Parachute System

NASA's Commercial Crew Partners Aim to Capitalize, Expand on 2013 Successes in 2014

ROBO SPACE
ALMA Discovers a Formation Site of a Giant Planetary System

Herschel Telescope Detects Water on Dwarf Planet

Bright star reveals new exoplanet

'Dwarf planet' in deep space has water

ROBO SPACE
Smooth sailing: Rough surfaces that can reduce drag

CCNY Team Models Sudden Thickening of Complex Fluids

CCNY Team Models Sudden Thickening of Complex Fluids

ESA to develop satellite reentry technology




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement